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Fruit-filled Manga comics may increase kids’ consumption of healthy food

Fruit-filled Manga comics may increase kids' consumption of healthy food

kidsfruitMore than a decade into adulthood, I’m still drawn in to the worlds created by sugar-cereal commercials. Hypnotized by the swirling pattern of Cinnamon Toast Crunch and captivated by the magic of Lucky Charms, I can see how actual kids’ eating behavior could be influenced by cartoon messaging.

So I was interested to read about a pilot study in New York City public school children that examined how reading comics featuring healthy food could have an effect on snack choice.

Science 2.0 reports:

It comprised 57 youth, approximately 11 years of age, nearly 90% of whom were either Black/African American or Hispanic and 54% were female. The school districts in the study had greater percentages of students eligible for free lunch (79 and 96%, respectively) compared to the citywide average of 66%.

After reading either a Manga comic, titled “Fight for Your Right to Fruit,” or a non-health-related newsletter, children were given the choice between a healthy snack (oranges, grapes, apples, strawberries) or an energy-dense snack (cookies, potato chips, nacho chips, and cheese-filled crackers). 61% of children in the comic group chose a healthy snack after reading, opposed to just 35% of the control group.

Regarding the choice of Manga, a Japanese comic form featuring detailed artwork and storytelling, the study notes:

The Transportation-Imagery Model (TIM) explains how Manga comics may contribute to changes in health-related beliefs and behaviors. According to the TIM, persuasion of a story’s messages occurs because an individual is “transported” or immersed into the narrative world.15 The TIM also suggests that images are most impactful when they are embedded in a story, rather than provided in isolation.15 Thus, visual images relevant to the story’s messages, such as those incorporated in Manga comics, may further influence attitudes and beliefs.

The authors write, “Results suggest Manga comics may be a useful format to promote healthy snack selection in urban minority youth.” (Side note: Writing about this pilot study made me want to eat mangoes.)

The research was published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Previously: Depictions of obesity in children’s moviesNo bribery necessary: Children eat more vegetables when they understand how food affects their bodies, Talking to kids about junk food ads, Health experts to Nickelodeon: Please stop promoting unhealthy food to our kids and Researchers find cartoons really do make food taste better (or so kids think)
Photo by North Charleston

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