Published by
Stanford Medicine

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of February 9

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Top 10 reasons I’m glad to be in medical school: In the latest installment of our SMS Unplugged series, first-year medical student Hamsika Chandrasekar highlights ten things she likes about being in medical school. Among them: discount coffee, sleeping in scrubs, and (on a more serious note) “finding meaning every day of my life.”

A rare cancer survivor’s journey to thriving and advocating: Here, an Inspire contributor shares her experience being diagnosed with a rare type of tumor and discusses why she became involved in patient advocacy. “I couldn’t live with the fact that no one knew much about this insidious disease and that research dedicated to pancreatic cancer lagged so far behind other major cancers,” she writes.

New Stanford-developed sweat test may aid in development of cystic fibrosis treatments: This blog entry discusses a development that could someday lead to more targeted treatment for cystic fibrosis, a recessive genetic disorder that affects the lungs and digestive system.

A physician shares his story of being diagnosed with amyloidosis: In a recent video, Kevin Anderson, MD, shares his story of working with Ron Witteles, MD, co-director of the Stanford Amyloid Center, to receive a heart transplant and get his health back on track after receiving a diagnosis of amyloidosis.

Stanford-developed device shown to reduce the size of existing scars in clinical trial: A device invented by School of Medicine researchers has demonstrated in a small clinical trial that it can help decrease the size of existing scars when used after scar-revision surgery.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Comment


Please read our comments policy before posting

Stanford Medicine Resources: