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Using Google Glass to help individuals with autism better understand social cues

The 2014 Big Data in Biomedicine conference was held here last month, and keynote speakers, panelists, moderators and attendees are now available on the Stanford Medicine YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to benefit human health, we'll be featuring a selection of the videos this month on Scope.

At the Big Data in Biomedicine 2014 conference, Dennis Wall, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics in systems medicine at Stanford, discussed how he and colleagues are leveraging home videos and a seven-point parent questionnaire to diagnose autism. In a pair of Behind the Scenes at Big Data videos, Wall discusses the research and its potential to speed up the standard diagnosis process, as well as another project aimed at using Google Glass to help autistic individuals better read others' emotions. Watch the above clip to learn how the wearable technology could be used for a new type of behavioral therapy.

Previously: Rising to the challenge of harnessing big data to benefit patients and Home videos could help diagnose autism, says new Stanford study

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