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Q&A about enterovirus-D68 with Stanford/Packard infectious disease expert

SONY DSCToday's New York Times features a story on the accelerating spread of enterovirus-D68, a virus that is causing severe respiratory illness in children across the country. As the Times reports, some emergency departments in the Midwest have been so swamped with cases that they've had to divert ambulances to other hospitals. Although California is still only lightly affected, the state's first four cases were confirmed by the California Department of Public Health late last week, with more expected to surface.

To help parents who may be wondering how to prevent, spot and care for EV-D68 infection, Yvonne Maldonado, MD, service chief of pediatric infectious disease at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, answered some common questions about the virus:

Enteroviruses are not unusual. Why is there so much focus from health officials on this one, EV-D68?

The good news is that this virus comes from a very common family of viruses that cause most fever-producing illnesses in childhood. But it’s been more severe than other enteroviruses. Some hospitals in other parts of the country have had hundreds of children coming to their emergency departments with really bad respiratory symptoms. The fact that it’s been so highly symptomatic and that there has been a large volume of cases is why it has gotten so much attention.

Have any patients at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford been affected with EV-D68?

As of today (Sept. 26), we have not yet had a documented case at our hospital. However, there have been a total of 226 confirmed cases in 38 states across the country. Some children who have this virus are probably not being tested, so the real number of cases nationwide is likely to be higher.

If your child has respiratory symptoms and you suspect EV-D68, what should you do?

The virus causes symptoms such as coughing, sneezing and runny nose. In some cases but not all, kids also have a fever. If your child has respiratory symptoms with or without a fever, especially if he or she also has a history of asthma, monitor your child at home. If you feel that he or she has been sick for a long period, is getting worse or is experiencing worsening of asthma or difficulty breathing, go see your pediatrician.

Which groups are most at risk?

Children with a history of asthma have been reported to have especially bad respiratory symptoms with this virus. It can affect kids of all ages, from infants to teens. So far, only one case has been reported in an adult, which makes sense because adults are more likely to have immunity to enteroviruses. We do worry more about young infants than older children, just because they probably haven’t seen the virus before and can get sicker with these viral infections.

How can the illness be prevented?

This virus is spread by contact with secretions such as saliva. If your children are sick, they should stay home from school to avoid spreading the illness to others. To avoid getting sick, stay at least three feet from people with symptoms such as coughing and runny nose, wash your hands frequently, and make sure your kids wash their hands often, too.

What is the treatment for EV-D68?

There is no treatment that is specific to the virus. At home, parents can manage children’s fevers with over-the-counter medications, make sure they drink lots of fluids to avoid dehydration, and help them get plenty of rest. For children who are very ill, doctors will check for secondary illnesses such as bacterial pneumonia, which would be treated with antibiotics, and may hospitalize children who need oxygen or IV hydration to help them recover.

Previously: Tips from a child on managing asthma
Photo by Michelle Brandt

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