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Foldscope beta testers share the wonders of the microcosmos

Foldscopes-TanzaniaChristmas came early for citizen-scientists who received the first batch of Foldscope build-your-own paper microscope kits from Stanford’s Prakash Lab over the last several months. These beta testers have begun sharing a variety of fascinating images, videos, tips and ideas on the Foldscope Explore website.

From this site, you can watch Foldscope videos of fluid pulsing through the brain of a live ant or the suction mechanism of a fly foot. One citizen scientist analyzes the structural differences between his brown and gray hair follicles. Another provides a tutorial on FBI bird-feather forensics. (Germophobes might want to skip the close-ups of a face mite or the fungus that grows in half-eaten yogurt cartons.)

Half the fun of receiving a Foldscope kit is the unboxing and building process, which has been captured in YouTube videos by Foldscope fans Christopher and Eric.


lens-mounterEach kit includes parts for building two microscopes, multiple lenses, magnets that attach a Foldscope to a smartphone camera lens, slide mounts, and a battery-powered light module. This allows users to view magnified images with the naked eye or projected on a wall. Photos or videos of Foldscope images can easily be captured and shared via smartphones.

For those of you who haven’t received your Foldscopes yet, rest assured that those who signed up on the beta test site will receive them soon. It’s taking longer than anticipated to build and ship 50,000 microscopes. (The gadget on the right was custom-designed to insert the tiny spherical ball lenses into the magnetic smartphone-mounting platform.)

For Foldscope updates, sharing and inspirations, bookmark Foldscope Explore.

Previously: Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscopeStanford microscope inventor invited to first White House Maker Faire, The pied piper of cool science tools and Free DIY microscope kits to citizen scientists with inspiring project ideas
Photo of Foldscope co-inventor Jim Cybulski and Tanzanian children building foldscopes by Manu Prakash; photo of lens mounting gadget by Kris Newby

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