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Peanut products and babies: Now okay?

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Updated 2-25-15: Allergy expert Sharon Chinthrajah, MD, discussed the study and its implications on KQED's Forum today:

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2-24-15: Any parent of young children is likely familiar with the warnings: It's not okay to give your baby peanut butter, or any other peanut product, before he or she turns one. Don't do it! These instructions are so imprinted on my brain that I practically did a double-take when I came across headlines about new research suggesting that infants should, indeed, be fed peanut products - in order to prevent the development of peanut allergies.

This isn't the first time that the benefits of giving allergenic foods to babies have been outlined, but the language surrounding this study has been particularly strong. As the writer of a New York Times blog entry explained, the authors of the study and accompanying editorial "called the results 'so compelling' and the rise of peanut allergies 'so alarming' that guidelines for how to feed infants at risk of peanut allergies should be revised soon." He went on to outline the study findings:

In the study, conducted in London, infants 4 to 11 months old who were deemed at high risk of developing a peanut allergy were randomly assigned either to be regularly fed food that contained peanuts or to be denied such food. These feeding patterns continued until the children were 5 years old. Those who consumed the foods that had peanuts in them were far less likely to be allergic to peanuts when they turned 5.

After hearing the news, I reached out to the folks at the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy Research at Stanford to get their take on the findings. Sharon Chinthrajah, MD, a clinical assistant professor of medicine, explained that this work is the first randomized controlled study to look at how to prevent peanut allergies. She told me:

We've all been waiting for the results of this landmark study to confirm the shift in the paradigm of when to introduce foods into the diet. Early introduction of peanut in the right infants can prevent peanut allergy. Dr. [Gideon Lack, the leader of the study] and colleagues were able to show an 80 percent reduction in peanut allergy in children who started eating peanut early and incorporated it into their regular diet.

Chinthrajah believes the guidelines on babies and peanut products should be revised, "because peanut allergies affect 2 percent of our population in the U.S. and most people do not outgrow this allergy." But, as other experts have done, she cautions that not everyone should introduce peanuts and other foods into their diet early. "Those who are 'high-risk' - who have other allergic conditions such as eczema or other food allergies - should consult with their allergist to see if it would be safe to introduce peanut into their child's diet," she advised.

Previously: Taking a bite out of food allergies: Stanford doctors exploring new way to help sufferers, Simultaneous treatment for several food allergies passes safety hurdle, Stanford team shows, Researchers show how DNA-based test could keep peanut allergy at bay, A mom’s perspective on a food allergy trial and Searching for a cure for pediatric food allergies
Photo by Anna

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