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Grand Roundup: Top posts of February

The five most-read stories this month on Scope were:

Sticky situation: How sugar affects our health: In this post, a clinical dietician with Stanford Health Care answers questions on the health risks of consuming too much sugar and offers tips on how to cut back.

Math and the brain: Memorization is overrated, says education expert: The research of Jo Boaler, PhD, a Stanford professor of mathematics education, shows that students are better at math when they’ve developed “number sense,” or the ability to use numbers flexibly and understand their logic.

For this doctor couple, the Super Bowl was about way more than football: Neurosurgeon Paul Kalanithi, MD, and his wife, Lucy, won a trip to the Super Bowl by raising money for lung-cancer research and winning the Lung Cancer Survivors Super Bowl Challenge, sponsored by the Chris Draft Family Foundation. Kalanithi was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2013.

Letting go of my secret about Charcot-Marie-Tooth, “the biggest disease no one has heard of”: As part of our Inspire series, a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth shares her story of living with - and opening up about - the disease.

Medical student-turned-entrepreneur harnesses Google Glass to improve doctor-patient relationship: Third-year medical student Pelu Tran is the co-founder of a company that helps doctors with patient record-keeping via Google Glass. Tran was recently named to Forbes’ “30-Under-30: Healthcare."

Our most-shared story of the month: Sticky situation: How sugar affects our health

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Popular posts

Category:
Genetics
Sex biology redefined: Genes don’t indicate binary sexes

The scenario many of us learned in school is that two X chromosomes make someone female, and an X and a Y chromosome make someone male. These are simplistic ways of thinking about what is scientifically very complex.