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A look at stem cells and “chemobrain”

As many as 75 percent of cancer patients experience memory and attention problems during or after their treatment, and up to 3.9 million are afflicted by long-term cognitive dysfunction. This foggy mental state, often referred to as "chemobrain," can also affect cancer survivors' fine motor skills, information processing speed, concentration and ability to calculate.

In this recently posted California Institute for Regenerative Medicine video, Stanford physician-scientist Michelle Monje, MD, PhD, explains the role that damage to stem cells in the brain plays in the condition, outlines some of the interventions that can mitigate patients' symptoms, and highlights efforts to develop effective regenerative therapies.

Previously: Stanford brain tumor research featured on “Bay Area Proud", Emmy nod for film about Stanford brain tumor research – and the little boy who made it possible and Stanford study shows effects of chemotherapy and breast cancer on brain function

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