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Science for popular audiences is not just “adding to the noise”

4787885058_d174638233_zIf you're reading this blog, chances are you're a fan of popular science - i.e. scientific research made accessible to people who aren't professional academics. Many academics, myself included, are also in favor of taking cutting-edge knowledge and sharing it broadly with the public.

But some scientists hesitate to share their work on forums like blogs and other social media. According to a recent SciLogs post, they worry that their knowledge might be wrong or incomplete, be misinterpreted, or just add more static to the internet's noise. But, as the post lays out, those who think about such things are precisely those who should be publishing for broader audiences. Those who publish misinformation are not stopping to question the quality of the knowledge they broadcast; doubt and the recognition of ignorance are the hallmarks of true scientists. Adding even a small amount of high-quality research to the "science media ecosystem" helps.

Moreover, much of the public seems to have little trust in media, much trust in scientists, and is more receptive to information that acknowledges uncertainty. So bring on the science blogs!

Previously: Can science journals have beautiful prose?, The disturbing trend of science by press release, Science rapper "busts a move" to explain Nobel discovery, Science writer Deborah Blum on blogging: "There were so many smaller stories I wanted to tell" and Veteran blogger offers tips for starting a science blog
Photo by Robin Bray-Hurren

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