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Grand Roundup: Top posts of August

It’s time to look back at this month’s five-most read stories on Scope. They were:

Eating for good blood: Tips for boosting iron levels and hemoglobin: This entry from the Stanford Blood Center discusses hemoglobin levels and offers ways to boost levels prior to blood donation.

Stanford Medicine’s white coat and stethoscope ceremony, in pictures: The school’s white coat and stethoscope ceremony was held earlier this month, and photographer Norbert von der Groeben was there to capture some special moments.

Blacks, Hispanics and low-income kids with stomach aches treated differently in ERs: A recently published study found that certain children who came to the ER with stomach aches were less likely to receive imaging that could help their physicians diagnose serious conditions like appendicitis. These patients were also less likely to be admitted to the hospital for further care.

Exploring the benefits of pursuing anthropology and medicine: This piece captures the thoughts of two medical anthropologists who are pursuing PhD/MD degrees.

“What might they be interested in learning from me?” Tips on medical advocacy: As part of our Inspire series, a patient with Marfan syndrome talks about medical advocacy. "I want to be a source of support and let patients know that they’re not alone and that there are better days ahead," he writes.

Our most-shared story of the month: Exploring the benefits of pursuing anthropology and medicine

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle provided a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

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