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Low-tech yet essential: Why parents are vital members of care teams for premature babies

3297657033_081d4f3630_zThanks to recent advances in medicine, technology and research, most premature babies born in the United States face better odds of surviving than ever before. Yet, the number of premature births in the U.S. remains relatively high, with a rate that's on par with that of Somalia, Thailand and Turkey.

For the parents of a premature baby, an early birth can transform what was supposed to be a happy event into a stressful one, says Henry Lee, MD, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford. In a recent U.S. News & World Report article penned by Lee, he discusses why it’s important for parents, and beneficial for the baby, when parents are active members of the child's medical team:

Giving birth to a preemie, especially when it's unexpected, leaves many parents feeling unprepared and helpless. But we make it clear very early. “You, the parent, are a critical part of our medical team.” That’s right. Even in the heart of Silicon Valley where we're located, two of our biggest assets are decidedly low-tech workers: the baby’s mom and dad.

Including parents in the care of preemies is a standard that was unheard of in the early days of neonatology, but is now used in leading NICUs for one critical reason: It works.

Here’s an example of how parents contribute. Studies have shown that skin-to-skin care, also known as kangaroo care, can have beneficial effects on preterm neonates, including improved temperature and heart rate stability. In many NICUs, you will see babies – clad only in a diaper and covered by a blanket – placed prone position on the chest of either the mother or the father. This intimate method of care provides a preterm baby a natural environment for rest, growth and healing.

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No matter when a baby is born, term or preterm, families know their children best. A parent’s contribution is critical to treating these most vulnerable of newborns.

Previously: How Stanford researchers are working to understand the complexities of preterm birthNew research center aims to understand premature birth and A look at the world’s smallest preterm babies
Photo by Sarah Hopkins

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