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Grand Roundup: Top posts from February

It’s time to look back at this month’s five most-read stories on Scope. They were:

  1. Belief brings relief — and sadness — after decades of doubt: In the latest installment in our Inspire series, a patient with mast cell activation syndrome shares her long journey to a diagnosis.
  2. Into the Magic Shop: Stanford neurosurgeon Jim Doty’s captivating memoir: In a new book, Into the Magic Shop, Stanford professor, neurosurgeon, entrepreneur and philanthropist Jim Doty, MD, details his life’s journey.
  3. When Breath Becomes Air: A conversation with Lucy Kalanithi: The memoir When Breath Becomes Air was written by Stanford neurosurgeon Paul Kalanithi, MD, who died of lung cancer at the age of 37. In a recent 1:2:1 podcast, Paul’s wife, Stanford physician Lucy Kalanithi, MD, talks about the words that Paul left behind and what life has been like since he died last spring.
  4. Non-scientist video gamers’ RNA insights captured in peer-reviewed publication: Stanford biochemist Rhiju Das, PhD, helped create a video game that allows players to design chemical sequences of RNA that fold stably into desired shapes. Earlier this month, the players co-authored a paper that describes what they've learned about designing the various shapes.
  5. How cancer stem cells dodge the immune system: This post discusses a Stanford study showing one of the ways cancer stem cells evade the body's immune system.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past: Eating for good blood: Tips for boosting iron levels and hemoglobin

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