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Grand Roundup: Top posts from March

It’s time to look back at this month’s five most-read stories on Scope. They were:

  1. Vitamin D levels connected to metastasis-associated protein, Stanford study finds: Researchers here have found evidence that vitamin D suppresses the expression of a gene known to accelerate the growth of breast cancer.
  2. Finding the right doctor and learning to live with a progressive genetic disorder — as a family: In this piece, part of our Inspire patient series, the wife of a patient with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2, discusses their long journey finding a clinician.
  3. A bioengineer’s dry eyes prompted effort to improve contact lenses: This piece reports on a step taken by graduate student Saad Bhamla and collaborators to make contact lenses more comfortable.
  4. Ready, set, match: It's Match Day: March 18 was Match Day, the medical school rite of passage where soon-to-be doctors learn where they will spend their residencies. More on what transpired can be found in this piece.
  5. An inside look at athletic training: Aren’t athletic trainers just for elite athletes: pro football players and top sprinters and the like? No, the writer of this post, which features a Q&A with Stanford athletic trainer Sarah Lyons, recently learned.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past: Sex biology redefined: Genes don't indicate binary sexes

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