Skip to content
Snowboarder surrounded by flying snow

Olympic snowboarder offers inspiration for those with congenital heart disease

Stanford pediatric cardiologist Seth Hollander comments on Shaun White's success, and explains the condition called tetralogy of Fallot.

For a baby born with the fairly common, but quite serious, congenital heart disease called tetralogy of Fallot, parents usually aim for survival first, and then for good health and the ability to live a full life. Hopes of raising a Olympic-level athlete generally don't make the cut.

But perhaps now, following the gold medal performances of U.S. snowboarder Shaun White, they will. White was born with the condition known as ToF. His success has inspired specialists like pediatric cardiologist Seth Hollander, MD, who was featured in a recent broadcast interview that was highlighted in a Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford blog post.

The interview is well worth a watch.

In the piece, Hollander said White's performance has generated discussion, and optimism, among medical teams and families affected by conditions like ToF: 'With the right treatment, many patients can go on to live ordinary — or, in Shaun White's case, extraordinary — lives."

Image by Mattias Olsson

Popular posts

Category:
Genetics
Sex biology redefined: Genes don’t indicate binary sexes

The scenario many of us learned in school is that two X chromosomes make someone female, and an X and a Y chromosome make someone male. These are simplistic ways of thinking about what is scientifically very complex.
Category:
Nutrition
Intermittent fasting: Fad or science-based diet?

Are the health-benefit claims from intermittent fasting backed up by scientific evidence? John Trepanowski, postdoctoral research fellow at the Stanford Prevention Research Center,weighs in.