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group photo at Match Day 2018

Inside the envelopes: Stanford Medicine’s Match Day

On Match Day, 70 graduating Stanford medical students matched with residencies at a celebratory — and suspenseful — event.

Match Day is riveting, even if your closest involvement with medicine is an occasional visit to the doctor. It's nerve-wracking: After months of thinking about where they'll kick off their MD careers, graduating medical students gather in a large room with a countdown clock and a table full of envelopes containing critically important important information. And, if that isn't enough, the students open these envelopes, and learn which hospital they've "matched" to, surrounded by family, friends, mentors and peers.

I get nervous just reading about it.

To help with the anxiety, Dean Lloyd Minor, MD, offered reassuring words to the 70 Stanford medical students who were waiting to "match" with a residency last Friday.

“When you open your envelopes today, I’m confident wherever you match, you will have the opportunity to grow and make contributions," Minor told them. "Take every advantage of every opportunity to become the very best that you can be.”

My colleague is a pro at capturing the spirit of the day. This year, she followed graduating medical student Victoria Boggiano — who admitted she was "petrified" by the experience — and chronicled the event. The article takes you there:

The room quieted as the students, many dressed in skirts and heels, or suits and ties, walked over to their advisers to pick up their envelopes.

The countdown clock showed just a few seconds remaining.

...Boggiano bounced up and down on her toes, her two closest friends nearby. 'Five, four, three, two….' Confetti flew through the air as 'Celebration,' by Kool & The Gang, blared on speakers.

...

Boggiano opened her envelope, clapped her hand over her mouth and started to cry. Then she held up the letter for everyone to see and hugged her friends. She’s headed to the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, her first choice.

There's more: Join in the fun by reading the full piece. And congratulations to everyone who matched!

Photo by Margarita Gallardo

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