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Procedure helps young girl suffering from seizure disorder

Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford is the only hospital in Northern California using the innovative ROSA™ technology to help children suffering from prolific seizure disorders.

"Gracin Hahne was 3.5 months old when she had her first seizure." So begins a recent Healthier, Happier Lives Blog story about a young girl with a condition called tuberous sclerosis complex, or TSC.

As the piece explains, TSC caused Gracin to have major seizures and speech difficulties — and her family made their way to Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford for treatment:

[Her parents] learned that Packard Children’s was the only hospital in Northern California using the innovative ROSA™ technology to help children suffering from prolific seizure disorders.

Guided by the surgeon, ROSA™ is a computerized surgical assistant that allows the most precise, minimally invasive movement and placement of tiny electrodes in the brain during surgery. ROSA™ could help doctors detect seizures deep in Gracin’s brain without having to open her skull or even shave her head, as other traditional methods require.

...

'For tuberous sclerosis, this is the ultimate treatment,' says Gerald Grant, MD.

Gracin had two procedures – the first in January 2017 – and the now-4-year-old is seizure free. Her mom says she loves singing, reading books and chatting with her 1-year-old brother, Lucas, and "we’re celebrating each of these moments."

Photo courtesy of the Hahne family

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