Skip to content
woman jumping

Stanford’s Childx conference starts today. Jump in!

Today marks the start of Stanford's third Childx conference, a TED-style event addressing challenges and solutions in child health. Hundreds of pediatricians, educators, scientists and policy experts are coming together for this year’s sessions on the theme “Learn, Collaborate, Innovate.”

Today marks the start of Stanford's third Childx conference, a TED-style event addressing challenges and solutions in child health. Hundreds of pediatricians, educators, scientists and policy experts are coming together for this year’s sessions on the theme “Learn, Collaborate, Innovate.”

The two-day program is full of exciting panels and keynote sessions, highlighting experts from across Stanford and invited guests from around the country, including:

  • Stephen Quake, PhD, a Stanford bioengineer who invented a widely used clinical test to find chromosomal defects in a fetus by analyzing fetal DNA in the mother’s blood
  • Jeffrey Kahn, PhD, MPH, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, who will speak on the ethics of making heritable gene edits in human fetuses
  • Carol Dweck, PhD, a Stanford professor of psychology who has conducted extensive research on how mindset affects children’s academic achievement
  • Raj Chetty, PhD, a Stanford economist and education policy expert whose talk will explain how big data can help us improve economic opportunities for children
  • Bronwyn Harris, MD, a Bay Area biotech entrepreneur working to improve at-home monitoring of pediatric chronic diseases such as asthma
  • Ruth Parker, MD, an Emory University professor of medicine and expert in health literacy

We'll have coverage of the event here on Scope tomorrow and Monday. In the meantime, you can join the conversation online by following the @StanfordMed Twitter feed or using the #StanfordChildx hashtag.

Photo by Larry Johnson

Popular posts

Category:
Genetics
Sex biology redefined: Genes don’t indicate binary sexes

The scenario many of us learned in school is that two X chromosomes make someone female, and an X and a Y chromosome make someone male. These are simplistic ways of thinking about what is scientifically very complex.
Category:
Nutrition
Intermittent fasting: Fad or science-based diet?

Are the health-benefit claims from intermittent fasting backed up by scientific evidence? John Trepanowski, postdoctoral research fellow at the Stanford Prevention Research Center,weighs in.