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Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of June 3

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of June 3

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Can yoga help women suffering from fibromyalgia?: A study published in the Journal of Pain Research shows that practicing yoga boosts levels of the stress hormone cortisol and could help ease some symptoms of fibromyalgia such as pain, fatigue, muscle stiffness and depression.

Ask Stanford Med: Chief of Emergency Medicine taking questions on wilderness medicine: Stanford Professor Paul Auerbach, MD, is taking questions on safety outdoors via the @SUMedicine Twitter feed.  The Q&A is part of Scope’s ongoing Ask Stanford Med series.

Do opium and opioids increase mortality risk?: Overdose from prescription opioids (e.g., Oxycodone or Hydrocodone) has become one of the most common causes of accidental death in the United States. Two new articles in BMJ suggest that overdose is not the only risk about which patients, prescribers and policy makers should be concerned.

Stanford neuroscientist discusses the coming dementia epidemic: In a talk at the Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford neuroscientist Frank Longo, MD, PhD, discusses the coming dementia epidemic and why there is reason to be optimistic.

Can yoga help women suffering from rheumatoid arthritis? Research from UC Los Angeles suggests women suffering from rheumatoid arthritis may find some welcome relief in yoga. Findings show practicing a style of yoga known as Iyengar may help boost mood and ease joint pain, fatigue and other symptoms.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of May 13

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Can yoga help women suffering from fibromyalgia?: A study published in the Journal of Pain Research shows that practicing yoga boosts levels of the stress hormone cortisol and could help ease some symptoms of fibromyalgia such as pain, fatigue, muscle stiffness and depression.

Stanford medical residents launch iPhone app to help physicians keep current on research: To help their colleagues keep current on medical advancements, Stanford medical residents Dave Iberri, MD, and Manuel Lam, MD, introduced a new medical app that features physician-written summaries of landmark clinical trials.

The Beast cut in on my song: Living with coronary microvascular dysfunction: As part of Scope’s partnership with Inspire, Catasauqua, Penn. resident Annette Pompa writes about her experience living with coronary microvascular dysfunction.

Honoring a pioneer in heart-transplant medicine: Sharon Hunt, MD, recently received a lifetime achievement award from the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. A pioneer in the field of post-transplant cardiology, she has cared for more than 1,500 heart transplant patients during her career.

Stanford professors propose re-imagining medical education with “lecture-less” classes: In a perspective piece in the New England Journal of MedicineCharles Prober, MD, senior associate dean for medical education at the School of Medicine, teamed with Chip Heath, PhD, a professor of organizational behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, to propose a new model for optimizing medical education.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of May 6

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Can yoga help women suffering from fibromyalgia?: A study published in the Journal of Pain Research shows that practicing yoga boosts levels of the stress hormone cortisol and could help ease some symptoms of fibromyalgia such as pain, fatigue, muscle stiffness and depression.

Stanford professors propose re-imagining medical education with “lecture-less” classes: In a perspective piece in the New England Journal of MedicineCharles Prober, MD, senior associate dean for medical education at the School of Medicine, teamed with Chip Heath, PhD, a professor of organizational behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, to propose a new model for optimizing medical education.

Malaria protection in wearable form: Two Cornell University affiliates have created a sophisticated suit built to keep away mosquitoes and the malaria they may carry.

Stanford President John Hennessy announces launch of $1 billion Campaign for Stanford Medicine: Stanford University President John Hennessy, PhD, announced the launch of the $1 billion Campaign for Stanford Medicine. The campaign will help build a new Stanford Hospital, as well as fund investments in medical research and teaching.

A closer look at ‘runner’s high’: In recent research published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, David Raichlen, from the University of Arizona, explored similarities between the feeling known as runner’s high and the addictive nature of drugs.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Apr. 29

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Twins update: Formerly conjoined twins strong and healthy: This update on Angelina and Angelica Sabuco, formerly conjoined twins who were separated in November at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, reports they are making a smooth recovery.

Can yoga help women suffering from fibromyalgia?: A study published in the Journal of Pain Research shows that practicing yoga boosts levels of the stress hormone cortisol and could help ease some symptoms of fibromyalgia such as pain, fatigue, muscle stiffness and depression.

Ask Stanford Med: Cardiologist Jennifer Tremmel taking questions on women’s heart health: Stanford interventional cardiologist Jennifer Tremmel, MD, took questions this week via the @SUMedicine Twitter feed and Scope about the growing body of research on women and cardiovascular disease, and how women differ from men, as part of Scope’s ongoing Ask Stanford Med series.

Stanford professors propose re-imagining medical education with “lecture-less” classes: In a perspective piece in the New England Journal of MedicineCharles Prober, MD, senior associate dean for medical education at the School of Medicine, teamed with Chip Heath, PhD, a professor of organizational behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, to look toward optimizing medical education.

Ask Stanford Med: Answers to your questions on health-care innovation: Stanford Graduate School of Business professor and founding director of the new Program in Healthcare Innovation, Stefanos Zenios, PhD, responds to questions about health-care innovation and entrepreneurship.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Apr. 22

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Time-lapse video captures childhood from birth to 12 years: Filmmaker Frans Hoffmeester recorded his daughter, Lotte, every week for 12 years and distilled that footage in a touching little two-minute video.

A shocking look at “blood farming”: Wired Science previously hosted an excerpt from The Red Market, a book by investigative journalist Scott Carney that looks at the underground trade in biological matter.

Can yoga help women suffering from fibromyalgia?: A study published in the Journal of Pain Research shows that practicing yoga boosts levels of the stress hormone cortisol and could help ease some symptoms of fibromyalgia such as pain, fatigue, muscle stiffness and depression.

Ask Stanford Med: Answers to your questions on health-care innovation: Stanford Graduate School of Business professor and founding director of the new Program in Healthcare Innovation, Stefanos Zenios, PhD, responds to questions about health-care innovation and entrepreneurship.

Cord blood donation program turns medical waste into a lifesaving resource: A new program at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital will give all its new moms the option to donate their baby’s cord blood to an international stem cell registry that can be searched by hematologists and oncologists whose patients need stem cell transplants.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Apr. 15

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Clinical trials: My next good chance: In this post from Inspire, cancer patient and blogger Linnea Duff discusses the value of clinical trials in treating patients.

Can yoga help women suffering from fibromyalgia?: A study published in the Journal of Pain Research shows that practicing yoga boosts levels of the stress hormone cortisol and could help ease some symptoms of fibromyalgia such as pain, fatigue, muscle stiffness and depression.

Stanford bioengineers create an ultra-low-cost oral cancer screening toolManu Prakash, PhD and his Stanford bioengineering team have developed an oral cancer screening tool that costs just a few dollars and can be used in rural regions of developing nations to help with early detection of the disease.

Registration for Stanford Medicine X now open: Registration for the Stanford Medicine X conference, which runs from Sept. 28-30 on the Stanford campus, is now open.  The first-ever Medicine X conference will cover a wide range of topics at the intersection of medicine and emerging technologies.

A shocking look at “blood farming”: Wired Science previously hosted an excerpt from The Red Market, a book by investigative journalist Scott Carney that looks at the underground trade in biological matter.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Apr. 8

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Micro Empire shows life in a drop of water: This video hows all of the life teeming in a drop of water. Its creator, Clemens Worth, shot the video using a digital camera and a monocular microscope.

Ask Stanford Med: Stefanos Zenios taking questions on health-care innovation and entrepreneurship: Stefanos Zenios, PhD, faculty organizer of the upcoming 2012 Healthcare Innovation Summit, is taking questions on health-care innovation and entrepreneurship.

A study of people’s ability to love: To celebrate Valentine’s Day, quarterly DVD magazine Wholphin released a short film documenting an experiment by Stanford neuroscientists to determine whether it’s possible for one person to love more than another.

Can yoga help women suffering from fibromyalgia?: A study published in the Journal of Pain Research shows that practicing yoga boosts levels of the stress hormone cortisol and could help ease some symptoms of fibromyalgia such as pain, fatigue, muscle stiffness and depression.

Mammoth effort: Scientists turn to Ice Age species to develop artificial blood for humans: In examining the woolly mammoth’s genetic make-up, scientists discovered mutations in its DNA that make it different from that of its Asian elephant cousins, which could serve as a blueprint for creating artificial blood products for modern medical procedures that involve reducing patients’ body temperature.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Mar. 11

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Can yoga help women suffering from fibromyalgia?: A study published in the Journal of Pain Research shows that practicing yoga boosts levels of the stress hormone cortisol and could help ease some symptoms of fibromyalgia such as pain, fatigue, muscle stiffness and depression.

Thousands of previously unknown drug side effects and interactions identified by Stanford study: Stanford bioengineer and geneticist Russ Altman, MD, PhD, and graduate student Nicholas Tatonetti have devised a way to sift through the mountains of data collected by the Food and Drug Administration after a drug is approved to identify never-before-suspected side-effects and drug interactions.

Ask Stanford Med: Rafael Pelayo answers questions on sleep research and offers tips for ‘springing forward’: As part of our ongoing Ask Stanford Med series, Stanford’s Rafael Pelayo, MD, responds to questions on sleep research and offers techniques for making sure disruptions like daylight saving time don’t cut into your sleep.

A study of people’s ability to love: To celebrate Valentine’s Day, quarterly DVD magazine Wholphin released a short film documenting an experiment by Stanford neuroscientists to determine if it’s possible for one person to love more than another person can.

‘Omics’ profiling coming soon to a doctor’s office near you?: Stanford geneticist Michael Snyder, PhD, is conducting an ongoing, dynamic look at the thousands upon thousands of biological processes that make us all tick. Over time, the analysis generates billions of bits of data that together paint a picture of our health status.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Mar. 4

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Can yoga help women suffering from fibromyalgia?: A study published in the Journal of Pain Research shows that practicing yoga boosts levels of the stress hormone cortisol and could help ease some symptoms of fibromyalgia such as pain, fatigue, muscle stiffness and depression.

New gadget for measuring white blood cells invented at Stanford: Stanford inventors have developed a new sensor that uses a clever combination of antibodies, magnets and laser light to count white blood cells in tiny samples of blood and other body fluids. The device is so small and inexpensive that it could be used nearly anywhere.

Ask Stanford Med: Neuroscientist responds to questions on pain and love’s analgesic effects: Stanford neuroscientist Sean Mackey, MD, PhD, responded to questions about pain research and the analgesic effects of love as part of our ongoing Ask Stanford Med series.

A study of people’s ability to love: To celebrate Valentine’s Day, quarterly DVD magazine Wholphin released a short film documenting an experiment by Stanford neuroscientists to determine if it’s possible for one person to love more than another person can.

The challenges of dieting and the promises of bariatric surgery: During a recent interview, John Morton, MD, MPH, one of the nation’s top weight-loss surgeons, reflected on the challenges of obesity in America and how bariatric surgery may be part of the solution for some.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Feb. 26

The five most-read stories on Scope this week were:

Can yoga help women suffering from fibromyalgia?: A study published in the Journal of Pain Research shows that practicing yoga boosts levels of the stress hormone cortisol and could help ease some symptoms of fibromyalgia such as pain, fatigue, muscle stiffness and depression.

Shrugging off bugs: there’s more to beating infections than just fighting themDavid Schneider, PhD, has used two kinds of bugs (fruit flies and bacteria) to great effect, teasing out intriguing insights into the effects of sleep and caloric  intake on response to infection.

Raising awareness about rare diseases: February 29 was Rare Disease Day, an international event intended to raise awareness of diseases that affect fewer than 1 in 2,000 people.  At Stanford and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, research is progressing on several rare disease that affect children.

Ask Stanford Med: Sleep specialist taking questions on how to ‘spring forward’ without feeling fatigued: This past week, Stanford’s Rafael Pelayo, MD, took questions from Scope readers on sleep research and ways for making sure the approaching daylight savings time change doesn’t cut into sleep time.

A study of people’s ability to love: To celebrate Valentine’s Day, quarterly DVD magazine Wholphin released a short film documenting an experiment by Stanford neuroscientists to determine if it’s possible for one person to love more than another person can.

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