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Intestinal tissue can be cultured in the form of little hollow "gutballs." To make them more useful, scientists figured out how to turn them inside out.

Intestinal tissue can be cultured in the form of little hollow "gutballs." To make them more useful, scientists figured out how to turn them inside out.

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You've already knew our modern high-fat, high-sugar, high-starch, minimal-fiber diet was going to be the death of us all, because you've been told a thousand times. Now, a new study in mice gives us yet another reason to watch our intake.

You've already knew our modern high-fat, high-sugar, high-starch, minimal-fiber diet was going to be the death of us all, because you've been told a thousand times. Now, a new study in mice gives us yet another reason to watch our intake.

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Stanford scientists have dug up a defect at the heart of rheumatoid arthritis: a faulty "anchor" that should be tethering a key molecule to the spot inside immune cells where it has to be in order to do its job.  It seems this defect can be reversed with a not yet commercially available small-molecule drug.

Stanford scientists have dug up a defect at the heart of rheumatoid arthritis: a faulty "anchor" that should be tethering a key molecule to the spot inside immune cells where it has to be in order to do its job.  It seems this defect can be reversed with a not yet commercially available small-molecule drug.

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Brain cells called oligodendrocytes supply insulation by wrapping neurons in multiple layers of fatty extensions, preserving signal strength and markedly speeding up transmission. But studying these cells in culture has been virtually impossible -- until now.

Brain cells called oligodendrocytes supply insulation by wrapping neurons in multiple layers of fatty extensions, preserving signal strength and markedly speeding up transmission. But studying these cells in culture has been virtually impossible -- until now.

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A study in Nature details a discovery with potential clinical significance for treating eating disorders such as anorexia. To make that discovery, Stanford researchers had to develop a "first-time-ever" way of teasing apart two separate but closely intertwined sets of identical-appearing neurons in the brain.

A study in Nature details a discovery with potential clinical significance for treating eating disorders such as anorexia. To make that discovery, Stanford researchers had to develop a "first-time-ever" way of teasing apart two separate but closely intertwined sets of identical-appearing neurons in the brain.

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New research has confirmed that an antigen in some variants of the flu virus and vaccine can, in rare cases, trigger an autoimmune response leading to narcolepsy.

New research has confirmed that an antigen in some variants of the flu virus and vaccine can, in rare cases, trigger an autoimmune response leading to narcolepsy.

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In a drive to reduce high cervical-cancer rates in Nigeria, a nonprofit organization co-founded by Stanford oncology researcher Ami Bhatt, MD, PhD, has enlisted the imaginative assistance of an educational comic book.

In a drive to reduce high cervical-cancer rates in Nigeria, a nonprofit organization co-founded by Stanford oncology researcher Ami Bhatt, MD, PhD, has enlisted the imaginative assistance of an educational comic book.

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Studies have associated low zinc levels with autism spectrum disorder. But why this should be the case has been unclear. Now, scientists may have an explanation for the link.

Studies have associated low zinc levels with autism spectrum disorder. But why this should be the case has been unclear. Now, scientists may have an explanation for the link.

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Genetic mutations affecting a single gene called LRRK2 play an outsized role in Parkinson's disease, but nobody's been able to say what the connection is between the genetic defect and the brain-cell die-off that characterizes the condition. Here's a clue.

Genetic mutations affecting a single gene called LRRK2 play an outsized role in Parkinson's disease, but nobody's been able to say what the connection is between the genetic defect and the brain-cell die-off that characterizes the condition. Here's a clue.

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