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When Stanford's James Spudich was diagnosed with lung cancer, one of his first thoughts was of his colleague, lung development expert Mark Krasnow. Within hours a group of Stanford scientists had launched an astoundingly comprehensive study of healthy and diseased human lung tissue from one of their own.

When Stanford's James Spudich was diagnosed with lung cancer, one of his first thoughts was of his colleague, lung development expert Mark Krasnow. Within hours a group of Stanford scientists had launched an astoundingly comprehensive study of healthy and diseased human lung tissue from one of their own.

Renowned microbe enthusiast Stanley Falkow has died at 84. Falkow was known for his generosity, wit and remarkable scientific acumen that led to the founding of the modern field of bacterial pathogenicity — the study of how bacteria cause human disease.

Renowned microbe enthusiast Stanley Falkow has died at 84. Falkow was known for his generosity, wit and remarkable scientific acumen that led to the founding of the modern field of bacterial pathogenicity — the study of how bacteria cause human disease.

The composition of the microbiome can be adjusted by pairing bacterial species with their favorite foods, a new Stanford Medicine study suggests.

The composition of the microbiome can be adjusted by pairing bacterial species with their favorite foods, a new Stanford Medicine study suggests.

Exposure to 'third-hand smoke' — that is, the chemicals left behind on household surfaces after smoke has dissipated — increases the severity of asthma symptoms in mice. Stanford researchers are working to learn how this happens, and whether it might be possible to protect people with asthma from this exposure.

Exposure to 'third-hand smoke' — that is, the chemicals left behind on household surfaces after smoke has dissipated — increases the severity of asthma symptoms in mice. Stanford researchers are working to learn how this happens, and whether it might be possible to protect people with asthma from this exposure.

Stanford researchers solve a long-standing mystery as to how mutations in a neighboring stretch of DNA can increase the expression of a cancer-associated gene called Myc. The finding highlights a potential new class of targets to block cancer cell growth.

Stanford researchers solve a long-standing mystery as to how mutations in a neighboring stretch of DNA can increase the expression of a cancer-associated gene called Myc. The finding highlights a potential new class of targets to block cancer cell growth.

Liver cells expressing high levels of telomerase – a protein normally associated with resistance to aging and implicated in cancers and stem cell maintenance – are necessary to regenerate the organ after normal cell turnover or in response to damage.

Liver cells expressing high levels of telomerase – a protein normally associated with resistance to aging and implicated in cancers and stem cell maintenance – are necessary to regenerate the organ after normal cell turnover or in response to damage.

Breast cancer in men and women differ in levels of cancer-associated gene expression and the relative risk of recurrence after initially successful treatment. Some men have a higher risk than women, whereas others have a much lower risk.

Breast cancer in men and women differ in levels of cancer-associated gene expression and the relative risk of recurrence after initially successful treatment. Some men have a higher risk than women, whereas others have a much lower risk.

Protein aggregates in young neural stem cells seem to echo those seen in neurodegenerative disease-- but could they actually be helpful? As the cells age, they become less able to process the aggregates and their ability to activate is dampened.

Protein aggregates in young neural stem cells seem to echo those seen in neurodegenerative disease-- but could they actually be helpful? As the cells age, they become less able to process the aggregates and their ability to activate is dampened.

Loss of taste sensation occurs in about 85 percent of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. A new Stanford study explored the problem.

Loss of taste sensation occurs in about 85 percent of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. A new Stanford study explored the problem.

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