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Stanford research shows that having high blood pressure at peak exercise intensity could indicate good fitness, rather than revealing heart disease risk.

Stanford research shows that having high blood pressure at peak exercise intensity could indicate good fitness, rather than revealing heart disease risk.

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In the final installment of the Demystifying Heart Failure series, physician Randall Stafford and graduate student Min Joo Kim explain how heart failure can be treated and managed.

In the final installment of the Demystifying Heart Failure series, physician Randall Stafford and graduate student Min Joo Kim explain how heart failure can be treated and managed.

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In this seventh post in the Demystifying Heart Failure series, physician Randall Stafford and graduate student Min Joo Kim outline key medications.

In this seventh post in the Demystifying Heart Failure series, physician Randall Stafford and graduate student Min Joo Kim outline key medications.

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This post, the sixth in the series, examines the benefits of activity for heart failure patients and provides some suggestions for exercising safely.

This post, the sixth in the series, examines the benefits of activity for heart failure patients and provides some suggestions for exercising safely.

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This installment in the Demystifying Heart Failure series provides dietary guidance for those with heart failure as well as for those hoping to prevent it.

This installment in the Demystifying Heart Failure series provides dietary guidance for those with heart failure as well as for those hoping to prevent it.

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In the fourth post in the Demystifying Heart Failure series, physician Randall Stafford and colleagues explain why the condition develops.

In the fourth post in the Demystifying Heart Failure series, physician Randall Stafford and colleagues explain why the condition develops.

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Scientists at Stanford use a gene therapy technique, called RNA silencing, to treat a heart condition called restrictive cardiomyopathy in mice.

Scientists at Stanford use a gene therapy technique, called RNA silencing, to treat a heart condition called restrictive cardiomyopathy in mice.

This third installment in the Demystifying Heart Failure series explains two primary types of heart failure and introduces Mr. F, a heart failure patient.

This third installment in the Demystifying Heart Failure series explains two primary types of heart failure and introduces Mr. F, a heart failure patient.

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The second post in the Demystifying Heart Failure series, co-authored by cardiologist Fatima Rodriguez, addresses misconceptions about heart failure.

The second post in the Demystifying Heart Failure series, co-authored by cardiologist Fatima Rodriguez, addresses misconceptions about heart failure.

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Stanford researchers discover a gel that, when applied to animal hearts, vastly reduces the formation of adhesions, scar tissue that cause complications.

Stanford researchers discover a gel that, when applied to animal hearts, vastly reduces the formation of adhesions, scar tissue that cause complications.

This post is the first in a series examining heart failure written by graduate student Min Joo Kim and physician-researcher Randall Stafford.

This post is the first in a series examining heart failure written by graduate student Min Joo Kim and physician-researcher Randall Stafford.

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Hana Yago got a new heart from an organ donor when she was a toddler. Last month, she and her parents met the young donor's family for the first time.

Hana Yago got a new heart from an organ donor when she was a toddler. Last month, she and her parents met the young donor's family for the first time.

E-cigarette flavorings are harmful to blood vessel cells even in the absence of nicotine. The flavors of cinnamon and menthol are particularly dangerous.

E-cigarette flavorings are harmful to blood vessel cells even in the absence of nicotine. The flavors of cinnamon and menthol are particularly dangerous.

Stanford researchers are using lab-grown heart cells to investigate how Chagas disease, which is spread by "kissing bugs," affects heart health.

Stanford researchers are using lab-grown heart cells to investigate how Chagas disease, which is spread by "kissing bugs," affects heart health.