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Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of January 26

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Permission: Learning to thrive in medicine by breaking my own rules: In the latest installment of SMS Unplugged, Stanford medical student Jennifer DeCoste-Lopez writes about fulfilling her passion for medicine – and honoring her desire to become a parent.

Hawkeye Pierce (i.e. Alan Alda) teaches scientists how to better communicate about their work: During a recent workshop with Stony Brook University’s Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, Stanford scientists practiced speaking and writing effectively about their work and learned which theater skills could be useful in building public interest in research.

You are what you read: The academic diet of the 21st-century medical student: Here, third-year medical student Mihir Gupta discusses the recent explosion of printed and digital medical resources that offer students alternatives to the classic texts that previous generations swore by. Gupta’s piece is the third installment in Scope’s weekly SMS Unplugged series.

A Stanford physician’s take on cancer prognosesPaul Kalanithi, MD, a chief resident in neurological surgery at Stanford, describes his experience as a cancer patient in a New York Times SundayReview piece.

Coming soon: A genome test that costs less than a new pair of shoes: At the sixth annual Personalized Medicine World Conference in Mountain View, Calif., industry leaders and academics discussed the falling price of genome sequencing. Amir Dan Rubin, president and CEO of Stanford Hospital & Clinics, gave a keynote talk at the start of the conference.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of January 19

The five most-read stories published this week on Scope were:

You are what you read: The academic diet of the 21st-century medical student: Here, third-year medical student Mihir Gupta discusses the recent explosion of printed and digital medical resources that offer students alternatives to the classic texts that previous generations swore by. Gupta’s piece is the third installment in Scope’s weekly SMS Unplugged series.

We just had the best two months in the history of U.S. mental-health policy: Thanks to three critical pieces of federal legislation, which are outlined here by Stanford addiction expert Keith Humphreys, PhD, the past two months have brought the “most expansive support for mental-health services in U.S. history.”

Another piece of the pulmonary-hypertension puzzle gets plugged into place: This entry discusses a new Journal of Experimental Medicine study led by Marlene Rabinovitch, MD, that sheds light on pulmonary hypertension, a mysterious disease marked by a dangerous increase in the pressure of blood vessels in the lung.

Helping older adults live independently using mobile-health technology: A Washington Post article from earlier this week discussed home-use medical devices that track behavior and vital signs in older adults to share with their doctors. Keeping tabs remotely could let an aging population stay in their homes longer.

A rare-disease patient turns to the Internet for comfort, confidence in managing her condition: In a recent Atlantic piece, writer Simona Supekar explained how her diagnosis of a rare disease prompted her to turn to the Internet to cope with the condition.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of January 12

The five most-read stories published this week on Scope were:

Basement floods, ski lifts, and Christmas cookies: Life lessons from winter break: In the second installment of Scope’s weekly SMS Unplugged series, Natalia Birgisson reflects on her first winter break as a medical student.

Saying thank you with art: Stanford undergrad pens one-woman play on cancer: Stanford senior Camille Brown has written a one-woman play called “Seeing the Spectrum.” The show is a series of intimate monologues telling the story of Camp Kesem at Stanford – a summer camp for the children of cancer patients – from the campers’ perspective.

Managing primary care patients’ risky drinking: Centers for Disease Control Director Thomas Frieden, MD, has called for more physicians to screen patients for risky alcohol consumption. In this entry, Keith Humphreys, PhD, outlines three barriers that have stood in the way of the screening and offers possible solutions.

Measuring the physical effects of yoga for seniors: The physical demands, efficacy, and safety of yoga for older adults have not been well studied. So investigators from the University of Southern California and University of California, Los Angeles conducted NIH-funded research to quantify the physical effects of seven yoga poses in 20 ambulatory older adults.

New preeclampsia toolkit will help prevent maternal deaths: The California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative has released a preeclampsia toolkit, including guidelines and education materials, to help prevent maternal deaths. Stanford’s Maurize Druzin, MD, co-led a task force that reviewed scientific literature on the disease. 

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for week of January 5

The five most-read stories published this week on Scope were:

Introducing SMS Unplugged: First-year med student Hamsika Chandrasekar kicks off Scope’s weekly SMS Unplugged series, which will feature pieces written by School of Medicine students reflecting on their experiences.

Social learning in a medical photo-sharing app for doctors: In this Q&A, Joshua Landy, MD, co-founder of Figure 1, discusses the free medical photo-sharing app and his time as a visiting scholar at Stanford.

Study shows happiness and meaning in life may be different goals: Stanford News reports on a recent study identifying five key differences between a meaningful life and a happy one.

Stanford among the beneficiaries of major gift from Ludwig Cancer Research: The School of Medicine has received $90 million from Ludwig Cancer Research to support the school’s innovative work in cancer stem cells, which are believed to drive the growth of many cancers.

Studying pediatric sleep disorders an “integral part” of the future of sleep medicine: Sleep specialist Rafael Pelayo, MD, writes about Stanford’s historic role in the development of sleep medicine, including work done with infants and children, in a recent entry on Stanford Sleep Center’s blog.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top 5 posts for 2013

The five most-read stories published this year on Scope were:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

My parents don’t think I’m smart enough for family medicine: One medical student’s story: In this candid guest post, Raymond Tsai, a fourth-year Stanford medical student, discusses his decision to pursue a career in family medicine despite his parents’ objections.

Best thing since sliced bread? A (potential) new diagnostic for celiac disease: A new diagnostic test developed by Stanford immunologist Mark Davis, PhD, and his team may provide a faster, more accurate and less invasive way to test patients for celiac disease. Their findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The secret life of hair follicles, revealed by Stanford researchers: Stanford researchers delve into the cells surrounding our hair follicles to better understand what makes them grow and maintain hair. In the process, research associate Yiqin Xiong, PhD, and associate professor of medicine Ching-Pin Chang, MD, PhD, have identified a signaling circuit that controls the activity of stem cells, called “bulge cells,” within the follicle.

The day my doctor thanked me: In this first-person piece, Inspire contributor Shani Weber shares how her experience with the rare genetic disorder Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) has helped her educate doctors and others about it.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of December 15

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of December 15

The five most-read stories published this week on Scope were:

Hope and faith are powerful medicine: In this first-person piece, Inspire contributor Buddy Ruck shares his experience with small cell lung cancer and highlights how hope and faith were key to getting him through.

Stanford study sheds light on narcolepsy, “will shape the next decade of research” into the disease: A study published this week confirms that narcolepsy is an autoimmune disease while also showing that the condition can sometimes be triggered by a similarity between a region of hypocretin and a portion of a protein from the pandemic H1N1 virus.

More reasons for doctors and researchers to take the social-media plunge: Three recent online pieces provide helpful tips on medical and science professionals’ use of social media.

Toilets of the future, and the art of squatting: Smithsonian Magazine’s blog recently noted that three students from the University of the Arts London have created a squat-friendly “wellbeing toilet,” which earned them first prize at the Toilet of the Future Competition.

Study: Bulimics may have difficulty perceiving their own heartbeat: A Stanford study appearing in the December issue of Eating Behaviors shows a possible link between bulimia and the ability to detect one’s own heartbeat.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of December 8

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of December 8

The five most-read stories published this week on Scope were:

Stanford bioengineer developing an “Electric Band-Aid Worm Test”: Bioengineering professor Manu Prakash, PhD, is at work on an electromagnetic patch that non-invasively detects live parasitic worms in infected patients.

Stanford undergrad studies cellular effects of concussionsTheo Roth, a senior majoring in biology, is first author of a study with researchers from the NIH that observes the brain’s response to a concussion at the cellular level.

Staphylococcus aureus holes up in upper nasal cavity, study shows: Microbiologist David Relman, MD, and colleagues have revealed that sites deep inside the nose may host  Staphylococcus aureus, a major bacterial cause of disease.

Stanford winners Michael Levitt and Thomas Südhof celebrate Nobel Week: Prize recipients Thomas Südhof, MD, and Michael Levitt, PhD, are participating in Nobel Week 2013 – a seven-day celebration in Stockholm.

Living with disorders of sex developmentAn emotional story in Pacific Standard discusses community resources and outreach for people born as intersex individuals.

And still going strong - the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of December 1

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

The science of willpower: The popular Stanford Continuing Studies course “The Science of Willpower” served as inspiration for a 2011 book from Stanford health psychologist Kelly McGonigal, PhD. In this entry, she offers a scientific framework for understanding willpower and explains how stress, sleep deprivation and nutrition can lessen our ability to resist temptations.

Using the “flipped classroom” model to re-imagine medical education: In the video featured here, Charles Prober, MD, senior associate dean for medical education at the School of Medicine, medical school colleagues, and Silicon Valley-based online learning pioneer Salman “Sal” Khan talk about their vision for a new medical curriculum.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of November 17

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of November 17

The five most-read stories published this week on Scope were:

The day my doctor thanked me: In this first-person piece, Inspire contributor Shani Weber shares how her experience with the rare genetic disorder Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) has helped her educate doctors and others about it.

Dilute bleach solution may combat skin damage and aging, according to Stanford study:study in mice shows processes that age and damage skin are impeded by dilute bleach solution; if the chemical is shown to work similarly in humans, it could provide a new way to treat inflammatory skin damage.

Stanford expert weighs in on new guidelines for statin use: The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology released new guidelines on which patients should take cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. Mark Hlatky, MD, professor of health research and policy and of cardiovascular medicine, shared his thoughts on the development here.

Placenta: the video game: An interactive simulation allows people to observe and control the development of the placenta. The video is a companion to a recent Stanford Medicine magazine article on the epidemic of the potentially fatal condition known as placenta accrete.

Stanford hearing study upends 30-year-old belief on how humans perceive sound: A key piece of the scientific model used for the past 30 years to help explain how humans perceive sound is wrong, according to new research.

And still going strong - the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of November 10

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of November 10

The five most-read stories published this week on Scope were:

The day my doctor thanked me: In this first-person piece, Inspire contributor Shani Weber shares how her experience with the rare genetic disorder Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) has helped her educate doctors and others about it.

Placenta: the video game: An interactive simulation allows people to observe and control the development of the placenta. The video is a companion to a recent Stanford Medicine magazine article on the epidemic of the potentially fatal condition known as placenta accreta.

Common drug class targets breast cancer stem cells, may benefit more patients, says Stanford study: Stanford radiation oncologist Max Diehn, MD, PhD, and colleagues have published new research on breast cancer; Diehn discusses the work here.

Should people with allergies get a flu vaccine?: Vaccines can contain substances that some people, such as people with gelatin allergies, may react to. Here we discuss some of the factors to consider when deciding which vaccines are best for you and your family.

Image of the Week: Neuron behavior and autism: This image compares neurons grown from people with Phelan-McDermid syndrome, a genetic disorder that’s associated with autism, to neurons from healthy people.

And still going strong - the most popular post from the past:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

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