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Health spending in the U.S. is projected to accelerate in the next decade. Stanford professor Kevin Schulman offers an explanation.

Health spending in the U.S. is projected to accelerate in the next decade. Stanford professor Kevin Schulman offers an explanation.

Retail prices at pharmacies may bear little relationship to the actual market prices of medications, and pharmacy benefit managers are part of the reason.

Retail prices at pharmacies may bear little relationship to the actual market prices of medications, and pharmacy benefit managers are part of the reason.

Proponents say a "Medicare for All" approach would expand access and affordability of health care in the U.S. But there are practical downsides.

Proponents say a "Medicare for All" approach would expand access and affordability of health care in the U.S. But there are practical downsides.

A Stanford professor unpacks some of the dynamics of the current drug pricing system and the potential effects of other approaches to this market.

A Stanford professor unpacks some of the dynamics of the current drug pricing system and the potential effects of other approaches to this market.

A Stanford-led study examines whether the Patient Activation Measure can serve as an early indicator that an effort is affecting health care costs

A Stanford-led study examines whether the Patient Activation Measure can serve as an early indicator that an effort is affecting health care costs

A diabetes program, developed with a Stanford scientist, helps cut costs of diabetes-related health care expenses by $815 per year per person.

A diabetes program, developed with a Stanford scientist, helps cut costs of diabetes-related health care expenses by $815 per year per person.

It’s one of the hardest questions in medicine: Should hospitals ever stop spending money to avert certain preventable deaths?

It’s one of the hardest questions in medicine: Should hospitals ever stop spending money to avert certain preventable deaths?

Stanford's David Ouyang sifted through more than a million texts to find out if clinicians inadvertently endorse brand-name medications over less expensive generic alternatives.

Stanford's David Ouyang sifted through more than a million texts to find out if clinicians inadvertently endorse brand-name medications over less expensive generic alternatives.