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Medicine 2.0

Media, Medicine 2.0, Stanford News, Technology

Medicine 2.0 slides available on SlideShare

A sampling of industry and academic presentations from this weekend’s Medicine 2.0 Congress are now available via the Medicine 2.0 twitter feed. Here are two we particularly enjoyed:

At the “New Scientist” session, PLoS ONE Publisher Peter Binfield, PhD, delivered a dynamic talk about PLoS ONE and the journal’s open-access publishing model. Binfield said:

I think the entire world’s literature is moving towards an open access model. I really believe we’re within five, and definitely no more than 10 years, of everything being open access. If you believe my prediction, then tomorrow we’re in a world where everything is open access and that’s a really interesting place to be. Because the entire output of the academic environment is would be completely accessible and can be remixed, data mined, etc.

…The scientific and academic literature is a world resource. It’s really the most valuable thing that our society publishes and we need a fire hydrant where 1.5 million articles are being blasted into the world. That, I think, is the transformation of academic publishing that we are about enter.

Slides from Binfield’s presentation, which was titled “The Transformation of Academic Publishing,” can be viewed here.

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Media, Medicine 2.0, Technology

Experts convene at medical school to discuss social media and patient-physician relationship

More than 400 medical researchers, physicians, health-care blogger and e-patients gathered at the Stanford Summit @ Medicine 2.0 last Friday to discuss how the development and deployment of social technologies will shape health care and biomedical research in 2011 and beyond. The Stanford Summit was held at the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge.

The daylong forum was organized into five themes and featured presentations from medical industry innovators and panels designed to spark discussion about how to leverage web-based tools to deliver leading-edge and coordinated care that is personalized.

Stanford physician and best-selling author Abraham Verhgese, MD, kicked off the event and introduced an overarching theme of the day: how health-care providers can embrace emerging technologies without losing the human touch that goes into patient care.

That theme was explored futher during the “Healthcare Transformers” session, which featured talks by Lee Aase, director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media; Seattle pediatrician Wendy Sue Swanson, MD; Jay Parkinson, MD, MPH, founder of The Future Well and HealthTap CEO Ron Gutman.

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Medicine 2.0

Live tweeting Medicine 2.0 Congress keynote speeches

The Medicine 2.0 Congress starts today with an opening keynote speech from Graduate School of Business Professor Jennifer Aaker, PhD.

The international conference is being held at Stanford on Saturday and Sunday and focuses on the use of web applications and social media in biomedical research and health-care delivery. Here’s a look at the program (.pdf) for the sold-out event.

In addition to Aaker, the event includes keynote speeches by BJ Fogg, PhD, director of the Persuasive Technology Laboratory at Stanford, and Susannah Fox, associate director of digital strategy at the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

Throughout the weekend, we’ll be live tweeting all three keynote talks. You can follow the tweets on the @SUMedicine feed or follow the hashtag #med2.

More news about the Medicine 2.0 conference at Stanford is available in the Medicine 2.0 category

Medicine 2.0

Live tweeting Stanford Summit @ Medicine 2.0 keynotes

The Stanford Summit @ Medicine 2.0 kicks off this morning with a keynote speech from Stanford physician and best-selling author Abraham Verhgese, MD.

Verhgese’s talk will be followed by presentations from industry luminaries, from e-patients and bloggers to executives and industry insiders, about the development and use of technologies being built by academia and industry that will shape medicine in 2011 and beyond. The daylong event will end with a keynote speech from Dennis Boyle, co-founder and partner of IDEO.

We’ll be live tweeting Boyle and Verhgese’s keynotes. You can follow the tweets on the @SUMedicine feed or follow the hashtag #med2.

More news about the Medicine 2.0 conference at Stanford is available in the Medicine 2.0 category

Media, Medicine 2.0

How physicians can manage information overload

Nice post from Bryan Vartabedian, MD, today aimed at helping doctors cope with information overload. Among his advice:

Minimize noise. The key to successful input management is the minimization of noise. And on social channels this means listening to those with the best signal (information) and tuning out those making the most noise. Ruthless tuning and control of who you let in is so important. The sooner you abandon the dated concept of the ‘courtesy follow’ the closer you will be to defining the signal you need. I struggle with email noise and work desperately to keep ads and non-critical communication out of my inbox.

Vartebedian will be a moderator at the Stanford Summit at Medicine 2.0 this Sept. 16.

Previously: A conversation with 33 Charts’ Bryan Vartabedian about professionalism in social media

Medicine 2.0

Medicine 2.0 organizers offer a need-based discount for ePatients

The organizers of the Medicine 2.0 conference at Stanford have just announced a scholarship program offering ePatients significant discounts off the conference registration fees. Interested ePatients should apply for the scholarship by August 10.

More news about the Medicine 2.0 conference at Stanford is available in the Medicine 2.0 category.

Dermatology, Media, Medicine 2.0, Parenting, Pediatrics, Videos

33 Charts: What effective health messaging looks like

This video is featured today on 33 Charts as an example of an effective, focused health message on the web. It features pediatrician and Medicine 2.0 speaker Wendy Swanson, MD. Swanson’s presentation is brief and energetic. Take a look. (Incidentally, 33 Charts author Bryan Vartabedian, MD, is also a moderator at Medicine 2.0.)

More news about the Medicine 2.0 conference at Stanford is available in the Medicine 2.0 category. Regular registration for the conference ends Monday.

Ethics, Media, Medicine 2.0, Pediatrics, Technology

Alan Greene talks about Medicine 2.0 and the future of doctor-patient communication

Alan Greene talks about Medicine 2.0 and the future of doctor-patient communication

The role of social media and Web 2.0 technologies in health care is a hot topic these days. From its usefulness in tracking health trends to the ethical dilemmas it poses when physicians get too buddy-buddy with their patients online, this role is a complex one. While the Internet is a powerful source of sometimes life-saving information, it is also host to a fair amount of misinformation and has the potential to complicate doctor-patient relationships.

Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital pediatrician Alan Greene, MD, is a pioneer in web-based medical information. Since 1995, Dr. Greene’s website has featured general pediatric health information as well as a community page that encourages parents to answer one another’s questions based on their own experience and knowledge. I spoke with Dr. Greene, who will be discussing the nuances and the future of online doctor-patient communication in this year’s Medicine 2.0 conference.

A recent report by the Pew Internet & American Life Project showed that online resources, including advice from peers, are a significant source of health information in the U.S. How can doctors help patients interpret online health information and identify credible sources?

Patients are going online to learn about health conditions before contacting a physician. What they find online might be great, not so good, or even dangerous. As doctors, we can help provide online resources we trust and simple materials to teach patients how to read critically and evaluate health resources.

More and more patients are going to social networking sites rather than content sites. The best way to make a difference there is to be part of the conversation yourself.

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Medicine 2.0

Stanford Summit @ Medicine 2.0 speaker Howard Rheingold discusses being an e-patient

Stanford Summit @ Medicine 2.0 speaker Howard Rheingold discusses being an e-patient

On January 15, 2010, social media pioneer and Stanford visiting lecturer Howard Rheingold was diagnosed with colon cancer. Rather than retreat from the public eye and battle the disease quietly, Rheingold chronicled his reaction to the diagnosis, treatment and recovery on a blog called Howard’s Butt. As illustrated in this brief blog excerpt, Rheingold’s account of his experiences were detailed and honest:

It’s been another rough week. Last night, [my wife] Judy and I spent 9 PM – 4 AM in the Marin General ER because I’ve been spiking mini-fevers above 100.5, which is apparently some kind of threshold. They took blood for cultures to find the cause of the infection, pumped me full of IV antibiotics, and sent me home with oral antibiotics. My white and red blood cells are scary low because the chemo worked, killing off fast-growing cells anywhere in my body. Which means I’m temporarily immunosuppressed. I’ll wear a mask tomorrow and refrain from shaking hands. The medication regime has become complicated. I need to take pain meds every three hours and antibiotics every eight hours, and the anti-diahrreal meds when I just can’t stand the run, scream, squirt routine any more. I can’t eat dairy too soon before or after taking the antibiotics. I take my temperature and chart it. Cancer has become something of a full-time job. I plan to retire from the Cancer biz soon.

Thankfully, he did retire from the “cancer biz” and has been given a clean bill of health. On Sept. 16, he’ll join DiabetesMine editor and founder Amy Tenderich and Paul Wicks, director of research and development at PatientsLikeMe, on a panel tilted “The Networked Patient: Communities of Practice and Participatory Medicine” at the Stanford Summit @ Medicine 2.0.

I recently checked in with Rheingold and asked him about his experiences as an e-patient. His responses follow.

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Medicine 2.0

Persuasive technology expert BJ Fogg to deliver a Medicine 2.0 keynote

Persuasive technology expert BJ Fogg to deliver a Medicine 2.0 keynote

More great news from the Medicine 2.0 conference: BJ Fogg, PhD, director of the Persuasive Technology Laboratory at Stanford, has been confirmed as a keynote speaker during the core conference. Larry Chu, MD, writes:

Dr. Fogg is a world-renowned expert in the use of persuasive technologies to change behavior. Trained as an experimental psychologist, Dr. Fogg seeks to understand how technology can be used to change people’s beliefs and behaviors.

His work empowers people to think clearly about the psychology of persuasion and then to convert those insights into real-world outcomes.

Regular registration rates end on Aug. 1. To register, visit the conference registration page.

More news about the Medicine 2.0 conference at Stanford is available in the Medicine 2.0 category.

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