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Events, Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology

Live tweeting Jack Andraka’s Medicine X keynote

Live tweeting Jack Andraka's Medicine X keynote

The Medicine X core conference kicked off yesterday, and today’s events begins with a keynote speech from Maryland high school student Jack Andraka. At age 15, Anraka created a novel paper sensor that detects pancreatic, ovarian and lung cancer in five minutes and costs a mere three cents.

Andraka’s talk, titled “On curiosity, open source research, and the new scientist,” will be followed by a diverse selection of presentations and lively panel discussions. We’ll be live tweeting the keynote and proceedings from the rest of the core conference starting at 8:15 AM Pacific time; you can follow our tweets on the @SUMedicine feed or follow the hashtag #MedX.

Members of the public are also welcome to attend the conference virtually through a high-quality streaming webcast. Registration for the webcast is free.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Teen cancer researcher Jack Andraka discusses open access in science, stagnation in medicine

 

Events, Medicine X, Patient Care, Stanford News, Technology

Stanford Medicine X 2013 begins today

Stanford Medicine X 2013 begins today

Larry ChuStanford Medicine X, a conference on emerging technology and patient-centered medicine, opens today. Things kick off with a keynote address at 8:15 AM Pacific time on the evolving role of the engaged patient by Marion O’Connor, lead specialist dietician at Oxford University Hospitals, NHS Trust, and ePatient Michael Seres.

Taking place now through Sunday, the conference will be held at the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge. This year’s Medicine X core missions include building better health care through thoughtful technological innovation, and increased collaboration between doctors, researchers, designers and patients. Check out the schedule for information on speaker events, master classes, panel discussions and more.

Those unable to attend the conference in person can participate in select sessions virtually through a high-quality streaming webcast; Registration for the Global Access Program webcast is free. We’ll also be live tweeting the talk by O’Connor and Seres, tomorrow’s keynote speech from high-school student and cancer researcher Jack Andraka, and other proceedings from the conference. You can follow our tweets on the @SUMedicine feed or follow the hashtag #MedX.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Medicine X offers free streaming through Global Access Program, Medicine X’s “What if health care…” seeks tweets, Stanford Medicine X hosts Google+ Hangout tonight, Teen cancer researcher Jack Andraka discusses open access in science, stagnation in medicine and Registration opens for Stanford Medicine X
Photo of organizer Larry Chu, MD, by StanfordMedX

Events, Medicine X, Stanford News

Medicine X offers free streaming through Global Access Program

Medicine X offers free streaming through Global Access Program

Medicine X 2013 is just a week away! Participants are twittering in anticipation of the patient-centered medical technology conference  (check out the conversations with #MedX). For those who are unable to attend the September 27-29 event in person, Medicine X has offered a high-quality streaming webcast of conference plenary proceedings, live photos, and other updates through their Global Access Program.

E-patients, academic scholars, students and more can join the Medicine X community by registering for the Global Access Program here.

Previously: Medicine X’s “What if health care…” seeks tweetsStanford Medicine X hosts Google+ Hangout tonightStanford Medicine X hosts live chat on Thursday with Bryan Vartabedian and Wendy Sue Swanson and Registration opens for Stanford Medicine X

Events, Medicine and Society, Medicine X

Medicine X’s “What if health care…” seeks tweets

Medicine X's "What if health care..." seeks tweets

Later this month at Medicine X, thinkers and doers will convene at Stanford to catalyze new ideas about the future of medicine and health care. You can help drive the discussion of a panel titled “What if health care…” by using the hashtag #whatifhc on Twitter to share your dream for the field. (Conference attendance not required!)

In a recent blog post, Stanford Medicine X executive director Larry Chu, MD, describes how the #whatifhc Twitter conversation got started between motivated community members and led to the formation of the September 27 panel.

From Chu’s post:

On February 9th of this year, researcher Susannah Fox published a blog post describing the subsequent discussions that sprung forth from that simple suggestion. She wrote,

“For over a year I’ve been the accidental manager of a community garden. All I did — I swear — is point out an open plot of land and people started pitching in, planting, asking friends to join them. All of a sudden we’d transformed a bare patch into something beautiful.” She went on to write, “They planted ideas about what health care could be like if we remade it, without regard for money, politics, or any other reality.”

So, what are some of your ideas?

Previously: Stanford Medicine X hosts Google+ Hangout tonightStanford Medicine X hosts live chat on Thursday with Bryan Vartabedian and Wendy Sue Swanson and Registration opens for Stanford Medicine X

Medicine X, Stanford News

Stanford Medicine X hosts Google+ Hangout tonight

Stanford Medicine X hosts Google+ Hangout tonight

Tune in this evening to the Stanford Medicine X blog to join a Google+ Hangout with Roni Zeiger, MD and Britt Johnson. They’ll discuss expert patients, online engagement and the benefits of physician-designers in participatory medicine.

During this year’s Stanford Medicine X conference, September 27-29, Zeiger will lead a master class on product design for health. Former Chief Health Strategist at Google, Zeiger is CEO of Smart Patients, a platform to help patients collaborate as experts. Johnson, a 2012 Medicine X ePatient and speaker in Medicine X Films, is a member of the 2013 Medicine X ePatient Advisory Board. She writes about her experience as a patient with rheumatoid arthritis on TheHurtBlogger.

Tonight’s live chat begins at 5 p.m. Pacific, 7 p.m. Central and 8 p.m. Eastern. Participants can ask questions via Twitter using the hashtag #MedX.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: How a “culture of permission” prevents doctors from being active in social media, Stanford Medicine X hosts live chat on Thursday with Bryan Vartabedian and Wendy Sue Swanson, Why networks of “micro-experts” are a valuable resource for the medical communityRegistration opens for Stanford Medicine X and Medicine X video discusses technology and participatory medicine

Medicine and Society, Medicine X, Technology

How a “culture of permission” prevents doctors from being active in social media

How a "culture of permission" prevents doctors from being active in social media

typing on computer

Last Thursday, organizers of the Stanford Medicine X conference hosted a live Google Chat on social media and doctors with Bryan Vartabedian, MD, and Wendy Sue Swanson, MD. Another physician-blogger, Mike Sevilla, MD, was among those who tuned in, and he had this to say today:

Why don’t more physicians participate in social media? The obvious topics of (lack of) time and (the fear of) risk were mentioned. But, another topic that was mentioned was a “Culture of Permission” mentioned by @Doctor_V.

What is this culture of permission? I get this question all the time as well: “Hey Mike, who did you ask before you started utilizing social media?” Did I as my practice, my hospital, my malpractice attorney, or my wife? Actually, I did not. But, he’s right in that there is this culture that exists that physicians must ask permission before doing something “risky” like use social media.

People focus too much on the bad and potentially bad stuff that can happen with social media. Of course they are out there. However, there are positive aspects to social media as well – like patient education (meaning patient education with right information and not wrong information), establishing a positive online presence for physicians, and utilizing social media for advocacy.

Previously: Stanford Medicine X hosts live chat on Thursday with Bryan Vartabedian and Wendy Sue Swanson, Advice for physicians when interacting with patients online, 33Charts’ Bryan Vartabedian talks about physician blogging, How can physicians manage their online persona? KevinMD offers guidance and Bryan Vartabedian: Physicians are public affairs professionals
Photo by Eneas

Medicine X, Stanford News

Stanford Medicine X hosts live chat on Thursday with Bryan Vartabedian and Wendy Sue Swanson

Stanford Medicine X hosts live chat on Thursday with Bryan Vartabedian and Wendy Sue Swanson

This September, prominent physician-bloggers Bryan Vartabedian, MD, and Wendy Sue Swanson, MD, will teach a master class about issues relating to physicians’ online identity at the Stanford Medicine X conference.

Both believe an online reputation and digital footprint are increasingly becoming more important for physicians. Vartabedian, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine and attending physician at Texas Children’s Hospital, recently co-founded the Medical Futures Lab. The center is dedicated to the study and understanding of medicine at its evolving intersection with technology. A pediatrician at Seattle Children’s Hospital, Swanson has spoken at length about how doctors can use social media to connect with patients and build partnerships. In the above video from Medicine X 2012, she discusses how clinicians can use social media to share their expertise and perspective on the latest health research.

On Thursday evening, Medicine X organizers will host a live Google Chat with Swanson and Vartabedian about social media and physicians. The chat begins at 5 p.m. Pacific Time and will be moderated by Sarah Kucharski, an e-patient advisor for the conference. Participants can watch the discussion live and ask questions via Twitter using the hashtag #MedX.

Previously: A reminder to young physicians that when it comes to social media, “it’s no longer about you”, Registration opens for Stanford Medicine X, Advice for physicians when interacting with patients online, 33Charts’ Bryan Vartabedian talks about physician blogging and How can physicians manage their online persona? KevinMD offers guidance

Cancer, Medicine X, Research, Stanford News

Teen cancer researcher Jack Andraka discusses open access in science, stagnation in medicine

Teen cancer researcher Jack Andraka discusses open access in science, stagnation in medicine

Maryland high school student Jack Andraka burst into the international scientific scene last year after winning the Gordon E. Moore Award at the 2012 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. He was awarded the top honor for developing a novel paper sensor that detects pancreatic, ovarian, and lung cancers in five minutes and costs as little as 3 cents. The rapid diagnostic test is 168 times faster, 26,000 times less expensive and more than 400 times more sensitive than the current test.

Andraka was inspired to create a better way to detect pancreatic cancer after a close family friend, who Andraka often says was like an uncle to him, was diagnosed with the disease and passed away shortly afterwards. After conducting research and learning that the current test for detecting the disease is 60 years old, and that the majority of pancreatic cancer cases are diagnosed at a late stage, he set out to invent a better method and hopefully save lives.

This fall, Andraka will deliver the opening keynote at the Stanford Medicine X conference, where he’ll talk about curiosity, open source research and the new scientist. I recently had the chance to ask him a few questions about his work.

At what point did your quest to learn more about pancreatic cancer transform into a research project to create a faster, cheaper and more accurate diagnostic test?

When my uncle was first diagnosed I really didn’t understand the gravity of the disease. I didn’t even know what a pancreas was! When he died so quickly after his initial diagnosis I was so surprised. I spent a lot of time on the Internet learning about the pancreas, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. I learned about how the disease was often discovered when it was advanced and how the lack of a reliable early detection screening method led to so many deaths. I thought there had to be a better way and started sketching out criteria for what an early detection method would need. At the same time, I was still reading about nanotubes, a subject that fascinated me and that I had done a project on the year before. When I sneaked a paper on nanotubes into biology class one day, the teacher was lecturing us on antibodies. I wondered what if I combined what I was reading about (single walled carbon nanotubes) with what I was supposed to be learning about (antibodies) and made a sensor to detect pancreatic cancer. Of course I had a lot of research to do to even begin making an experimental design!

You contacted more than 200 scientists involved in research on pancreatic cancer requesting space in their lab to test your experiment and only received one response. How did you overcome this challenge and find the motivation to move forward without losing hope?

I spent a lot of time preparing my proposal and I was quite excited about it. I used the Internet to find professors in my area who were working on the subject. I figured I would send some e-mails out and then sit back and wait for the acceptances to roll in! Of course these are busy and successful professionals and many didn’t even take the time to respond to a 14-year-old. Those who did either replied that they had no room, or that they were working on something a bit different or even that my idea was impossible. Many times I was dejected and discouraged and my mom would tell me that maybe in a few years when I was 16 I could try again, or that maybe I could change my research topic. Then she’d tell me that if I believed in my topic I should keep trying. So I’d head back to the Internet and look up some more names. Actually all the rejections helped me because I refined and improved my project and bolstered it with even more detailed material lists, even including catalog numbers. When [Johns Hopkins researcher Anirban Maitra, MBBS,] said “maybe’ and invited me in for a discussion, I knew this was my big chance and came prepared with binders of journal articles and a really well-prepared grant proposal. It only takes one ‘yes’ for a door to open and then it’s up to you to take advantage of the opportunity.

What was it like to be a high school student working in a lab at Johns Hopkins?

I was so focused on convincing a professor to give me an interview to work in a lab that I didn’t think ahead to imagine what it would be like being a freshman high school student working with very experienced researchers in a lab like Johns Hopkins! Again my lack of experience helped me because I was more excited than intimidated. I first realized what I had got myself into when I arrived for my initial interview. There were so many researchers asking me serious questions and they were all much older than me. I wasn’t intimidated though because I was well prepared and enjoyed the discussion. In the lab everyone was helpful. If I asked a question, they took the time to answer. It helped that I tried to be as self-sufficient and prepared as possible and to not have the need to be “babysat.”

Medicine X explores the potential of information technologies to advance the practice of medicine, improve health and empower patients to be active participants in their own care. How have you used information technologies in your own research?

I had no access to any information that wasn’t on the Internet. I was able to educate myself using Google and Wikipedia. These resources can empower not only patients, but researchers like me who do not have access to university libraries or classrooms. I was able to learn the basics and then dig deeper as questions arose. I was able to access research from many fields and then connect the dots to create my new sensor. My mentor, Dr, Maitra, mentioned a colleague who regularly brought home journals from different fields to read and think about. I did not have access to many of these journal articles due to paywall barriers, but the articles I was able to access from many different fields served the same purpose for me. I was able to download journal articles and connect the dots to create my pancreatic cancer sensor.

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Events, Medicine X, Stanford News

Registration opens for Stanford Medicine X

Registration opens for Stanford Medicine X

Updated 06-05-13: John Sculley will no longer be a keynote speaker at the conference due to a scheduling conflict. Additional keynote speakers will be announced in the coming weeks.

This fall, innovative thinkers engaged in using social media and mobile computing applications to improve health-care delivery and advance the practice of medicine will meet Sept. 27-29 the School of Medicine for the Stanford Medicine X conference. Registration for the three-day event is now open.

The conference will be held at the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning & Knowledge and feature presentations and panels covering a variety of topics, including patient-centered design, participatory medicine, crowd funding for health projects and the impact of information technology on biomedical research. More details on the conference program from our release:

Delivering the opening keynote at the conference is Maryland high school student Jack Andraka, winner of the 2012 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair and the Smithsonian American Ingenuity Award. Andraka invented a novel paper sensor that detects pancreatic, ovarian and lung cancers in five minutes and costs a mere 3 cents.

Also delivering a keynote speech is John Sculley, former president of PepsiCo and past CEO of Apple Inc. One of America’s best-known business leaders, Sculley is a vocal advocate for health innovation and mentor to an elite group of health-care entrepreneurs.

New to this year’s conference is the Medicine X Master Class program, a series of small-venue seminars taught by experts in specific disciplines. Confirmed master-class speakers include Roni Zeiger, CEO of Smart Patients; Susannah Fox, an associate director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project; Sonny Vu, CEO of Misfit Wearables; Bertalan Meskó, MD, founder of Webicina; Wendy Sue Swanson, MD, pediatrician and author of the Seattle Mama Doc blog; Bryan Vartabedian, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine; and patient advocate and artist Regina Holliday.

The early registration deadline is June 15 and space is limited. To register, visit the Medicine X website.

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Photo by Stanford Medicine X

Aging, Health and Fitness, Medicine X, Stanford News, Technology, Videos

What type of smartphone apps are effective for promoting healthy habits among older adults?

What type of smartphone apps are effective for promoting healthy habits among older adults?

As previously reported here, Stanford researcher Abby King, PhD, and colleagues have been testing different smartphone apps to determine what type of framework best promotes exercise and eating healthy among older adults.

All three apps in her study used the accelerometer in participants’ smartphone and a custom program to monitor how active individuals were during the day. The analytic version used goal-setting and feedback to motivate users. The social comparison design utilized support and competition among a group to encourage participants to meet goals. And the third one, the game-style app, promoted attachment to an avatar, a digital bird, that thrived or languished depending on the healthy habits of its “owner.”

In a talk at last fall’s Stanford Medicine X conference, King shared results from her research and discussed which types of apps were most effective in improving healthy behaviors. The video, which was just posted online, offers some interesting evidence on how mobile device apps can change users’ behavior quicker than traditional methods.

Previously: Computer-generated phone calls shown to help inactive adults get – and keep – moving, Eat a carrot and exercise – or your iBird diesResearch shows remote weight loss interventions equally effective as face-to-face coaching programs and Monitoring patient wellness from a distance

Stanford Medicine Resources: