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'Resting' exhausted cancer-fighting immune cells enhances their tumor-killing activity, which may help people with blood and solid cancers.

'Resting' exhausted cancer-fighting immune cells enhances their tumor-killing activity, which may help people with blood and solid cancers.

A Stanford-led study of twins with and without food allergies has uncovered differences in the fecal bacteria of allergic and non-allergic individuals.

A Stanford-led study of twins with and without food allergies has uncovered differences in the fecal bacteria of allergic and non-allergic individuals.

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Stanford University researchers have developed a nanoparticle vaccine that has shown in mouse studies to effectively build coronavirus immunities.

Stanford University researchers have developed a nanoparticle vaccine that has shown in mouse studies to effectively build coronavirus immunities.

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Stanford scientists transformed tonsils into immunology labs in a dish, aiding research to develop vaccines for COVID-19, the flu and other diseases.

Stanford scientists transformed tonsils into immunology labs in a dish, aiding research to develop vaccines for COVID-19, the flu and other diseases.

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The Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are the first to use the RNA coding molecule to prompt our bodies to fight the virus. Here's how they work.

The Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are the first to use the RNA coding molecule to prompt our bodies to fight the virus. Here's how they work.

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Understanding similarities between the Nipah virus and COVID-19 could provide clues for avoiding future novel virus outbreaks.

Understanding similarities between the Nipah virus and COVID-19 could provide clues for avoiding future novel virus outbreaks.

Stanford Medicine’s early development of testing for COVID-19 infection and antibodies helped guide government responses and stem local spread of the virus.

Stanford Medicine’s early development of testing for COVID-19 infection and antibodies helped guide government responses and stem local spread of the virus.

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There's a voracious appetite for information on how SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, works. Here it is, in a single package.

There's a voracious appetite for information on how SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, works. Here it is, in a single package.

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How Stanford Medicine ramped up in the spring of 2020 to cope with a coming global pandemic and learned how to brace for the next wave of COVID-19 patients.

How Stanford Medicine ramped up in the spring of 2020 to cope with a coming global pandemic and learned how to brace for the next wave of COVID-19 patients.

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A Stanford research team is tasked with assessing the COVID-19 infection crisis inside California’s prisons and providing strategies to contain the virus.

A Stanford research team is tasked with assessing the COVID-19 infection crisis inside California’s prisons and providing strategies to contain the virus.

Stanford researchers and colleagues have invented a genetic safety mechanism that can deactivate transplanted cells if they change in a problematic way.

Stanford researchers and colleagues have invented a genetic safety mechanism that can deactivate transplanted cells if they change in a problematic way.

A NOVA special featured Rhiju Das and the OpenVaccine project, in which gamers help scientists find an RNA molecule configuration for a COVID-19 vaccine.

A NOVA special featured Rhiju Das and the OpenVaccine project, in which gamers help scientists find an RNA molecule configuration for a COVID-19 vaccine.

The Stanford Clinical Virology Laboratory is ramping up capacity for its coronavirus diagnostic test, which can deliver results in 24 hours.

The Stanford Clinical Virology Laboratory is ramping up capacity for its coronavirus diagnostic test, which can deliver results in 24 hours.

Scientists found a sneaky way to stop cold viruses from replicating in mammalian cells by disabling a protein not in the virus but in the cells they infect.

Scientists found a sneaky way to stop cold viruses from replicating in mammalian cells by disabling a protein not in the virus but in the cells they infect.

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