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Found in about half of all bacterial species, the cell membrane that surrounds the cell wall may be more critical for survival than previously thought.

Found in about half of all bacterial species, the cell membrane that surrounds the cell wall may be more critical for survival than previously thought.

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In an interview, Stanford bioengineer Michael Fischbach discussed the growing knowledge of the bacteria in our bodies and what that means for the future of medicine.

In an interview, Stanford bioengineer Michael Fischbach discussed the growing knowledge of the bacteria in our bodies and what that means for the future of medicine.

Researchers have used an ultrafast, intense X-ray laser to observe how Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria attack antibiotics, making the drugs ineffective.

Researchers have used an ultrafast, intense X-ray laser to observe how Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria attack antibiotics, making the drugs ineffective.

A hitherto unheralded set of telltale enzymes may prove to be perfect targets for shooting down a gang of nasty bacterial pathogens collectively called S. aureus.

A hitherto unheralded set of telltale enzymes may prove to be perfect targets for shooting down a gang of nasty bacterial pathogens collectively called S. aureus.

Renowned microbe enthusiast Stanley Falkow has died at 84. Falkow was known for his generosity, wit and remarkable scientific acumen that led to the founding of the modern field of bacterial pathogenicity — the study of how bacteria cause human disease.

Renowned microbe enthusiast Stanley Falkow has died at 84. Falkow was known for his generosity, wit and remarkable scientific acumen that led to the founding of the modern field of bacterial pathogenicity — the study of how bacteria cause human disease.

The composition of the microbiome can be adjusted by pairing bacterial species with their favorite foods, a new Stanford Medicine study suggests.

The composition of the microbiome can be adjusted by pairing bacterial species with their favorite foods, a new Stanford Medicine study suggests.

Stanford researchers have discovered a genetic "tuning knob" that can enlarge or shrink bacteria across a wide range - and this can be used to fatten up the bacteria to increase their susceptibility to certain antibiotics.

Stanford researchers have discovered a genetic "tuning knob" that can enlarge or shrink bacteria across a wide range - and this can be used to fatten up the bacteria to increase their susceptibility to certain antibiotics.

A technique for growing sticky films of bacteria into elaborate microscopic images could reveal how potentially dangerous biofilms grow and transmit antibiotic resistance, and could lead to novel biomaterials or synthetic microbial communities.

A technique for growing sticky films of bacteria into elaborate microscopic images could reveal how potentially dangerous biofilms grow and transmit antibiotic resistance, and could lead to novel biomaterials or synthetic microbial communities.