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Exposure to 'third-hand smoke' — that is, the chemicals left behind on household surfaces after smoke has dissipated — increases the severity of asthma symptoms in mice. Stanford researchers are working to learn how this happens, and whether it might be possible to protect people with asthma from this exposure.

Exposure to 'third-hand smoke' — that is, the chemicals left behind on household surfaces after smoke has dissipated — increases the severity of asthma symptoms in mice. Stanford researchers are working to learn how this happens, and whether it might be possible to protect people with asthma from this exposure.

Ask a child with asthma how easily he or she can breathe, and you won’t get an objective answer. But where Q&A fails, technology can take over, according to a team of Stanford researchers who are developing a way to predict asthma attacks in advance.

Ask a child with asthma how easily he or she can breathe, and you won’t get an objective answer. But where Q&A fails, technology can take over, according to a team of Stanford researchers who are developing a way to predict asthma attacks in advance.