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A technique for growing sticky films of bacteria into elaborate microscopic images could reveal how potentially dangerous biofilms grow and transmit antibiotic resistance, and could lead to novel biomaterials or synthetic microbial communities.

A technique for growing sticky films of bacteria into elaborate microscopic images could reveal how potentially dangerous biofilms grow and transmit antibiotic resistance, and could lead to novel biomaterials or synthetic microbial communities.

Stanford chemist Lynette Cegelski and her team discovered a new form of bacterial cellulose, a finding that could shed light on new ways to fight bacterial infections.

Stanford chemist Lynette Cegelski and her team discovered a new form of bacterial cellulose, a finding that could shed light on new ways to fight bacterial infections.

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The community of bacteria living inside our own guts is about as local an ecosystem as we’re likely to find. So you’d think navel-gazing biologists …

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