Skip to content

Donor gift leads to innovative cancer clinical trial

When Jeff Schottenstein's wife was diagnosed with gastric cancer in 2014, he immediately jumped into action and left no stone un-turned in researching potential solutions to address her rare type of cancer. Working with doctors at Stanford and mobilizing a network of pharmaceutical and industry contacts, Schottenstein  -- featured in the video above -- dedicated his efforts to uncovering solutions beyond traditional treatment methods.

Despite the fact that his wife wouldn't benefit, Schottenstein made a gift in her honor that he hopes might someday provide better options for others suffering from the disease. Now, thanks in large part to his gift, an innovative dual-drug trial he and his wife envisioned became reality: A new phase II clinical trial at Stanford is focusing on two immunotherapy agents for the treatment of metastatic stomach and esophageal cancers.

Previously: Cancer survivor's brother takes on "Death Ride" to benefit breast cancer research
Video by Mark Hanlon/Stanford Medical Center Development

Popular posts

Category:
Biomedical research
Stanford immunologist pushes field to shift its research focus from mice to humans

Much of what we know about the immune system comes from experiments conducted on mice.  But lab mice are not little human beings. The two species are separated by both physiology and  lifestyles. Stanford immunologist Mark Davis is calling on his colleagues to shift their research focus to people.