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Stanford orthopedic surgeon Eugene Roh at Olympics

Olympic dreams come true for Stanford sports medicine physician

Stanford orthopedic surgeon Eugene Roh is serving as a Team USA physician during the Winter Olympics in South Korea.

Keep your eyes peeled during the Olympics — you might spy Stanford's Eugene Roh, MD, in one of the ice rinks. Roh, a sports medicine specialist, was selected as a Team USA physician and he'll be on hand near the ice, and wherever he's needed.

As you can imagine, he's rather excited. "Being part of Team USA is a once-in-a-lifetime experience, a dream come true. It's a chance to work with the best medical team in sports medicine, as well as the best athletes in the world," Roh explained in a recent Stanford Medicine Q&A.

In fact, his interest in sports medicine stems from his trip to the Olympic Games in 1988 with his middle school class. "It was such a pivotal memory in my life," Roh said.

Now, Roh is returning to his native South Korea with his wife and son as a official doctor at Team USA, ready to care for top athletes. Obviously, he's a fan:

Their discipline and passion about what they like to do is inspiring. It’s not easy work. In those moments where we all feel settled in life, and get a little lazy, we look to the athletes who inspire us to catapult ourselves to the next level.

The Olympics, even a particularly chilly one, is on a level of its own. Best wishes, Dr. Roh -- we're rooting for you.

Photo courtesy of Eugene Roh

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