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Stanford Medicine X | ED returns to the stage this weekend

Stanford Medicine X | ED, the two-day conference that brings together patients, researchers, physicians and students to improve medical education, returns this weekend.

Tomorrow Stanford Medicine X | ED, a two-day event devoted to exploring and improving medical education, kicks off.

If you're a Medicine X devotee, you know that this is one of the few medical conferences where you'll see patients, medical students and physicians on the same stage exchanging ideas and expertise with the goal of improving medical education.

If you're new to the event, here's a tip that will transform your experience — use the hashtag #MedX to join the extensive and perennially active online conversation about medical education and patient-centered care.

The jam-packed event begins bright and early Saturday morning at 8 a.m. with presentations from researchers, ePatients, medical students and physicians including Stanford Medicine's Dean Lloyd MinorLarry Chu, MD, event founder and director and Stanford anesthesiologist; ePatient Leilani GrahamHugo Campos, who was named the White House Champion of Change for Precision Medicine; health care designer Justin Lai; and medical journalist Amitha Kalaichandran, MD, to name just few. 

Three keynote presentations punctuate the weekend conference. Victor Montori, MD, a researcher in the science of patient-centered care will discuss "Why we revolt." Bon Ku, MD, will discuss creating health in the 21st century though design-led education. Dinesh Palipana, MD, will address disability inclusivity in medicine. 

Follow along here on Scope blog and @StanfordMed for coverage of the event and join the online conversation via #MedX.

Photo courtesy of Stanford Medicine X | ED

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