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Health Matters, Stanford Medicine’s free community day, is back

At a free event on May 19, Stanford faculty and researchers will present the latest medical breakthroughs and give talks on ways to improve everyday health and wellness.

Health Matters, Stanford Medicine’s free community day, returns with a fresh batch of expert health talks and a pavilion brimming with interactive exhibits for all ages.

At the May 19 event, Stanford faculty and researchers will present the latest medical breakthroughs and give talks on ways to improve everyday health and wellness. Topics range from immunotherapy to stroke prevention, heart health, palliative care, chronic disease, genome sequencing, and more.

At the outdoors Health Matters pavilion, Stanford health professionals will provide one-on-one biometric and functional movement screenings, as well as personalized health advice. Visitors will also have several “Tech Matters” features to explore, including the Anatomage Table, a 3D anatomy display used to teach med students virtual dissection, plus a 360-degree tour of a real brain guided by the Stanford Neurosurgical Simulation & Virtual Reality Center.

Registration is free, but space is limited. To see the full program of health talks and pavilion stations, as well as past presentations, visit the event website.

And for those Health Matters enthusiasts unable to attend in person: Plan to follow @StanfordHealth on Twitter for live-tweeting of a talk from Mike Snyder, PhD, called “Using your genome sequence and big data to manage your health,” at 10 AM Pacific time on Saturday; or watch our first Health Matters Facebook Live event, “Immunotherapy: Using your body’s natural defenses to fight cancer,” with cancer researcher Crystal Mackall, MD, at 11:15 AM Pacific time. And be sure to share your own Health Matters story on social media by using the hashtag #HealthMatters2018.

Photo by Linda Eaman

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