Skip to content

Ribbon-cutting celebrates realization of new Stanford Hospital vision

Leaders from Stanford and Palo Alto spoke at the ceremony dedicating the 824,000-square-foot medical facility, which opens in November.

For many years, the new Stanford Hospital was a vision. Something shimmering on the horizon, as Stanford Health Care President and CEO David Entwistle recently said.

Not anymore. Dignitaries, faculty, staff and community members gathered last week in a ribbon-cutting ceremony in the soaring atrium of the new building -- just weeks away from welcoming its first patient on Nov. 17 -- to celebrate the realization of a dream more than 10 years in the making. An article, photos and a video in Inside Stanford Medicine documented the happy event.

Entwistle said:

The fact that we're here today to celebrate the culmination of more than a decade of work is truly amazing. We're here today because of the thousands of hours of effort from dedicated individuals. We should all take pride in what we've been able to accomplish together.

Entwistle was joined by several leaders, including Dean Lloyd Minor, MD; Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne, PhD; Palo Alto Vice Mayor Adrian Fine; and John Levin, JD, chair of the Stanford Health Care Board of Directors.

Lloyd Minor, dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine, speaks at the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new Stanford Hospital.
Lloyd Minor, dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine, speaks at the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new Stanford Hospital.

They spoke of the new hospital's dedication to continuing Stanford's rich legacy of providing high-quality health care and fostering cutting-edge innovations in the Palo Alto community and beyond. As Minor said,

We want to drive biomedical research that changes health care here at Stanford and around the world... Having a world-class hospital and world-leading clinicians to collaborate with vastly increases the power and speed with which we will be able to translate our discoveries to the benefit of all people.

Photos by Steve Fisch

Popular posts

Category:
Biomedical research
How do the new COVID-19 vaccines work?

The Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are the first to use the RNA coding molecule to prompt our bodies to fight the virus. Here's how they work.