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Smiles and sunshine: Stanford Medicine graduation in photos

Students celebrate their graduation from Stanford School of Medicine in person for the first time in three years.

After three years of virtual ceremonies, 266 graduates gathered in person with friends, proud parents and family members to celebrate their graduation from Stanford Medicine on June 11.

Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the Stanford School of Medicine reflected on the trials of the pandemic and how, in the face of a health crisis, the Stanford Medicine community responded with resilience and strength.

"Crises either bring people together or drive them apart. I'm so grateful that because of who you are as individuals and who we are as a community, this crisis brought us together and strengthened our resolve," Minor said. "Because of science and the sheer will of so many, here we are, in person together, looking forward to the future with significantly more determination than trepidation."

Featured commencement speaker Laurene Powell Jobs praised graduates for their accomplishments and offered guidance, too. "I can think of no better group -- better trained and better equipped -- to care for the world than you. Always carry with you mercy, dignity, beauty and justice, for these, too, are medicine," she said.

Below, we share some of the highlights of the day in photos.

Dean Minor speaks to the graduates at the ceremony.
Laurene Powell Jobs speaks to the graduates.
A graduating PhD student receives her hood.
A family captures the day with a photo.
A recent graduate celebrates with a young admirer.
The ceremony included 23 returning graduates from the Class of 2020 and 16 from the Class of 2021.
Graduates make their way to the stage to receive their diplomas.
A group of graduating medical students celebrates together.
Julia Nguyen and Marissa Grillo, graduating physician assistant students, celebrate together.
A little friend accompanies Stephanie Nevins, PhD graduate, to the stage.

Photos by Steve Fisch

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