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Health and Fitness, In the News, Sleep, Videos

“Father of Sleep Medicine” talks with CNN about what happens when we don’t sleep well

"Father of Sleep Medicine" talks with CNN about what happens when we don't sleep well

Dement - smallA good night’s sleep is often the first thing to go when we have an important work deadline or health issue. I know this from firsthand (and recent!) experience: I let a foot injury kept me up until 4 a.m. today even though I know that cheating sleep – or getting a poor night of sleep – is bad for my health.

But is skimping out on sleep now and again really that bad? As Chief Medical Correspondent Sanjay Gupta, MD, and Stanford sleep expert William Dement, MD, PhD, explain in a recent CNN feature: yes. When we rest, our bodies go to work, Gupta explains: “When your head hits the pillow, your body doesn’t shut down. It uses that time to heal tissue, strengthen memory, even grow.”

Dement, who founded the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine in the 1970s and has devoted his career to understanding sleep, has lots of experience with patients who miss out on these benefits because they don’t sleep well – due to obstructive sleep apnea. (The disorder, he says, affects 24 percent of adult males in the U.S.) In the piece, he and Gupta discuss the risk factors, such as excess weight and large tonsils, linked to sleep apnea and what can be done to alleviate the problem.

If you have a few minutes, this video is worth a watch. Dement makes his first appearance at the 2.5-minute mark.

Previously: Stanford doc gives teens a crash course on the dangers of sleep deprivationWilliam Dement: Stanford Medicine’s “Sandman”Stanford docs discuss all things sleep, Why untreated sleep apnea may cause more harm to your health than feeling fatigued and What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?
Photo, which originally appeared in Stanford Medicine, by Lenny Gonzalez

In the News, Media, Science

Science enthusiasts flock to #IAmAScientistBecause and #BeyondMarieCurie on Twitter

Science enthusiasts flock to #IAmAScientistBecause and #BeyondMarieCurie on Twitter

iamascientistbecause tweet - smallRecently, a friend of mine commented that scientists “don’t use Twitter much.” The statement may have been true in the past, but as evidenced by #IAmAScientistBecause and #BeyondMarieCurie, scientists and science enthusiasts are now driving some trending topics on Twitter.

Yesterday, a story on Nature.com explained how these two popular hashtags have encouraged scientists to speak out. The first was created by the NatureCareers team in summer 2014, and the hashtag’s popularity suddenly increased earlier this week after Jon Tennant (@Protohedgehog), a graduate student studying paleontology at Imperial College London, shared the hashtag with his 6,000 some followers on Twitter. By Tuesday, the hashtag was trending on Twitter.

The resulting flood of tweets rallied scientists like epidemiologist Chelsea Polis, PhD, (@cbpolis) who told Nature.com she spent a day following the IAmAScientistBecause Twitter campaign online. “Despite all of the negatives, there’s so much that’s beautiful about science,” Polis said.

Meanwhile, a separate empowering conversation began when science editor Melissa Vaught (@biochembelle) tweeted about Rachel Swaby’s (@rachelswaby) Wired.com story on scientific achievements made by women. In her story, Swaby states that one woman tends to dominate conversations of female scientists and that we need to open our eyes to the many contributions other female scientists have made, and are making, to science:

Today if you ask someone to name a woman scientist, the first and only name they’ll offer is Marie Curie. It’s one of the biggest obstacles to better representation of women in science and technology, and it’s time to cut it out. Stop talking about Marie Curie; she wouldn’t have wanted things this way.

Vaught told Nature.com that she created #BeyondMarieCurie as a response to Swaby’s article because “we need diverse stories of women in science.”

As I scrolled through the hundreds of Tweets aggregated by the two hashtags one post in particular stood out. As shown above, chemist Carina Jensen, PhD, (@Chem_Monkey) tweeted, “IAmAScientistBecause a professor said women don’t do well in Chemistry. I proved him wrong.” For me, this unites the sentiments of the two hashtags beautifully.

Previously: The power of social media: How one man uses it to help amputees get prostheticsA day in the lab: Stanford scientists share their stories, what fuels their workChipping away at stereotypes about older women and science, one story at a timeWhat’s holding women in the sciences back? and Women in science: A rare breed

Patient Care, Research, Stanford News

Patients who have a good emotional fit with their doctors are more likely to follow their advice

Patients who have a good emotional fit with their doctors are more likely to follow their advice

15633607804_fb1e60c03c_zGetting patients to trust – and take – their doctor’s advice isn’t always easy. In the United States alone, an estimated 40 percent of patients in certain disease groups struggle to follow their doctor’s recommendations.

A recent Stanford News story highlighted the importance of feeling emotionally aligned with your doctor. Patients are more likely to listen to, and approve of, doctors that convey the emotions and states they’d like to have.

In the study (subscription required, pdf here), psychologist Jeanne Tsai, PhD, and postdoctoral fellow Tamara Sims, PhD, recruited 101 adults from the San Francisco Bay Area to answer a series of questions about their health and emotional state.

Each participant received recommendations, such as “do muscle strengthening” or “rest,” from a virtual physician that focused on either “high arousal” or “low arousal positive states.” Participants that received advice from the “high arousal” virtual doctor were told to do activities that would increase their energy levels, while participants that got advice from the “low arousal” doctor were advised to take steps to help them relax.

For the next five days, participants reported how well they adhered to their virtual doctor’s advice, how calm or energized they felt, and how relaxed or energetic they wanted to feel. At the end of the five-day period, each participant ranked their virtual doctor’s competence, knowledge, and trustworthiness.

The researchers found that participants who wanted to feel more energized were more likely to prefer and listen to the advice of the high-energy doctor. Participants who wanted to feel more relaxed were more likely to favor and adhere to advice from the low-energy doctor.

As Tsai explains in the story, the importance of this study is that doctors may be able to encourage their patients to trust and take their advice more often if they make it a priority to identify their patient’s health goals first and then tailor their treatments accordingly.

Previously: Study explores how cultural differences can shape the way we respond to sufferingA call for extended bedside-manner trainingAbraham Verghese discusses reconnecting to the patient at the bedside and Hands on: Abraham Verghese teaches bedside skills
Photo by www.audio-luci-store.it

Chronic Disease, Clinical Trials, Genetics, Patient Care, Pediatrics, Stanford News

Cystic fibrosis patient on her 20+ years of care

Cystic fibrosis patient on her 20+ years of care

lauren-catron-dr-conrad-stanford-childrens560

When Lauren Catron was first diagnosed with a severe form cystic fibrosis, an inherited disease that makes mucous and sweat glands go haywire, her doctors were unsure that she’d live to be a teenager. That was nearly 23 years ago. Now, 26-year-old Catron is a full-time college student at Mission College in Santa Clara, Calif. with enough energy to work a job in her spare time.

Catron credits her sustained health to the more than two decades of care she’s received at the Pulmonary and Cystic Fibrosis Center at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. Catron shares her story on the Happier, Healthier Lives Blog:

“When I was first diagnosed in 1992, the doctors told my parents that I may not make it to my teens,” said Catron, who has the genotype associated with a shorter lifespan and the most severe symptoms of cystic fibrosis, including a constant buildup of mucus in her lungs that interferes with breathing. “But a whole team of people at Stanford has dedicated themselves to keeping me healthy. They have given me absolute unconditional support, amazing treatment and care, and have become my second family.”

Carol Conrad, MD, director of the pediatric pulmonary function lab, explains that the center’s expert care stems from the many clinical trials and studies they do to advance the treatment of cystic fibrosis. “No other CF center in California is doing these kinds of clinical trials,” Conrad said.

This research, which ranges from dietary-supplement studies by Conrad to gene therapy work done by Richard Moss, MD, shows promise. Moss and his colleagues were the first to discover that gene therapy could improve pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis patients – an important finding that may lead to a treatment for the disease in the future. “As depressing as the disease can be, there’s a lot of hope. That’s what keeps us motivated,” said Conrad.

Previously: New Stanford-developed sweat test may aid in development of cystic fibrosis treatmentsFilm about twin sisters’ double lung transplants and battle against cystic fibrosis available onlineDiverse microbes discovered in healthy lungs shed new light on cystic fibrosis and Living – and thriving – with cystic fibrosis
Photo of Conrad (left) and Catron courtesy of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital

Global Health, Mental Health, Research, Stanford News

Study explores how cultural differences can shape the way we respond to suffering

Study explores how cultural differences can shape the way we respond to suffering

8909380232_a647e15c23_zOur emotions may be a deeply personal experience, but the way we perceive and express our feelings may not be as unique – or random – as we think. According to recent research, culture influences the way some Americans and Germans convey their mood. If this is universally true, it could mean that people of the same culture tend to express their feelings in similar ways.

As this Stanford Report story explains, researchers Jeanne Tsai, PhD, an associate professor of psychology, and Birgit Koopmann-Holm, PhD, a German citizen who earned her doctorate in Tsai’s lab, noticed that Americans of European decent and Germans seemed to differ in the way they express feelings of sympathy:

Americans tend to emphasize the positive when faced with tragedy or life-threatening situations. American culture arguably considers negativity, complaining and pessimism as somewhat “sinful,” [Tsai] added.

Unlike when Americans talk about illness, Germans primarily focus on the negative, Tsai and Koopmann-Holm wrote. For example, the “Sturm und Drang” (“Storm and Drive”) literary and musical movement in 18th-century Germany went beyond merely accepting negative emotions to actually glorifying them.

This seemingly simple observation could have important societal implications, the researchers explain: Studies show that empathy affects our willingness to help someone who is suffering. But, as noted in the article, “until now, Tsai said, no studies have specifically examined how culture shapes ‘different ways in which sympathy, compassion or other feelings of concern for another’s suffering might be expressed.'”

In their study (subscription required, pdf here), published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the researchers conducted four separate experiments on 525 undergraduate students in the U.S. and Germany to see if Americans accentuate the positive more than Germans do when expressing their condolences. The students were asked how they would feel in a variety of hypothetical situations (such as a scenario where a friend lost a loved one), what feelings they would want to avoid and how they would select and rate sympathy cards.
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In the News, Pain, Patient Care, Research

More benefit than bite: Potential therapies from “pest” animals

More benefit than bite: Potential therapies from "pest" animals

512px-Scary_scorpionA painful spider bite can make you question why such creatures exist. Yet just because “pests” like spiders, scorpions, and snakes lack the appeal that kittens and puppies possess, it doesn’t mean they aren’t important or useful.

Yesterday, an article from Medical News Today drove this message home by highlighting some of the medical benefits we derive from six of the creatures we tend to complain the most about. As writer Honor Whiteman explains in the story, scientists are exploring ways to use toxins and substances produced by so-called pest animals, such as spiders scorpions, and reptiles, to treat chronic pain, repair nerves, and develop new ways to kill the human immunodeficiency virus.

From the piece:

In 2013, MNT [Medical News Today] reported on a study published in Antiviral Therapy, in which researchers revealed how a toxin found in bee venom – melittin – has the potential to destroy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

The investigators, from the Washington University School of Medicine, explained that melittin is able to make holes in the protective, double-layered membrane that surrounds the HIV virus. Delivering high levels of the toxin to the virus via nanoparticles could be an effective way to kill it.

A more recent study published in September 2014 claims bees may also be useful for creating a new class of antibiotics. Researchers from the Lund University in Sweden discovered lactic acid bacteria in fresh honey found in the stomachs of bees that has antimicrobial properties.

The story cites several other potential uses for venoms and animal-derived substances, such as my favorite example, Gila monster spit:

In 2007, a study by researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine revealed how exenatide – a synthetic form of a compound found in the saliva of the Gila monster, called exendin-4 – may help people with diabetes control their condition and lose weight.

The compound works by causing the pancreas to produce more insulin when blood sugar is too high. In the study, 46% of patients who were given exenatide in combination with diabetes drug metformin had good control of their blood sugar, compared with only 13% of control participants.

As Whiteman explains in the article, many of these potential medical treatments are still in the early stages of development. Yet some therapies, such as the synthetic version of the compound found in Gila monster saliva, exenatide, are already in use, offering hope that other animal-derived medical treatments may be available in the future.

Previously: Tiny fruit flies as powerful diabetes modelFruit flies headed to the International Space Station to study the effects of weightlessness on the heartBiomedical Indiana Jones travels the world collecting venom for medical research and Tarantula venom peptide shows promise as a drug
Photo by H Dragon

In the News, Patient Care, Research, Videos

Researchers develop bandage that senses bedsores before they appear

Researchers develop bandage that senses bedsores before they appear

Bedsores have been the bane of immobile patients, and their doctors, for decades. In the 19th century, the consequences of these skin lesions were so severe they were said to herald death. Today, doctors and medical processionals are trained to prevent these dying patches of skin, and the serious septic infections associated with them, by ensuring that patients do not sit or lie in the same position for too long, but this method is imperfect.

Now, researchers from the University of California, Berkeley and the University of California, San Francisco have developed a new bandage that senses dying skin cells before they’re visible to the human eye. This bandage could help doctors and medial professionals detect bed sores in their earliest stages when they can easily be healed, according to a press release:

“By the time you see signs of a bedsore on the surface of the skin, it’s usually too late,” said Dr. Michael Harrison, a professor of surgery at UCSF and a co-investigator  of the study. “This bandage could provide an easy early-warning system that would allow intervention before the injury is permanent. If you can detect bedsores early on, the solution is easy. Just take the pressure off.”

As associate professor Michel Maharbiz, PhD, explains in the video above, the cellophane-like bandage works by using a network of electrodes to detect the changes in electrical signals associated with dying cells. “The genius of this device is that it’s looking at the electrical properties of the tissue to assess damage. We currently have no other way to do that in clinical practice,” said Harrison.

Previously: New medicine? A look at advances in wound healingResearchers turn to spider webs to design improved medical tape and The human condition

Events, Global Health, Health Costs, Health Disparities, Health Policy, Stanford News

Global health expert: Economic growth provides opportunity to close the “global health gap”

Yamey talkStanford’s Center for Innovation in Global Health hosted a recent seminar for Stanford students and faculty with global health-policy expert Gavin Yamey, MD, MPH. The discussion focused on the disparity in heath care between higher- and lower-income countries and how economic growth in lower-income countries could set the stage for big improvements in global health.

During the talk, Yamey explained that millions of lives could be saved if economic gains in low- and lower-middle-income countries were invested in health care. “I can’t think of any other investment on the planet that could improve human welfare in such a huge way,” Yamey told the audience.

As described in an online story on the event, Yamey cited Rwanda – a country that rebuilt its economy and healthcare after the 1994 genocide – as an example of how this scenario could play out elsewhere:

Over the past decade, Rwanda has experienced significant drops in mortality associated with HIV, malaria and maternal death, and achieved the greatest drop in child mortality rates in recorded history. While scholars acknowledge several factors that contributed to such an extraordinary rebound, government spending on public health, the smart use of aid, and economic growth were all integral to the equation.

“We have an extraordinary opportunity to bring down maternal, newborn and infectious disease deaths to universally low levels everywhere,” Yamey said. “But for that to happen, we need an aggressive scale up of existing tools and interventions, investment in new tools and a build-up of delivery systems.”

Previously: Minimum wage: More than an economic principle, a driver of healthHealth care in Haiti: “At risk of regressing”Child-mortality gap narrows in developing countries and Stanford general surgeon discusses the importance of surgery in global health care
Photo, of Gavin Yamey (left) and moderator Paul Costello, courtesy of the Center for Innovation in Global Health

CDC, Ebola, Global Health, In the News, Infectious Disease

All hands on deck: Doctor answers call to work on largest Ebola epidemic in history

DSCN0895 cropped and resizedIn the nearly 70-year history of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) only three disasters called for an “all hands on deck,” Level 1 emergency response – Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the H1N1 pandemic of 2009 and the Ebola epidemic of 2014. This Ebola epidemic – the largest one in history – was the first assignment for Christopher Hsu, MD, PhD, from the Epidemic Intelligence Services (EIS) officer training program at the CDC.

As an EIS officer in the Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology at CDC, Hsu investigates and studies deadly and exotic pathogens like chikungunya, monkeypox, rabies and Ebola.

Given Hsu’s work on disease at CDC, I was surprised to learn that the topic of his prestigious three-year fellowship at Stanford was cancer, not infectious disease. I asked Hsu about this and what it’s like working on the largest Ebola epidemic in the world. He summed it up this way: “I get to work with very deadly and interesting diseases. I travel, see new cultures and am immersed in my work. I’m not just studying the disease; I’m in the jungle, studying the disease where it began with the people from that region. It’s a great honor to be in that position.”

Hsu’s switch from studying cancer to investigating infectious disease sounds drastic, but it wasn’t much of a stretch, he explained. Hsu earned a PhD in veterinary pathobiology studying interspecies disease transmission before he began studying cancer at Stanford. “I enjoyed the work, but I also recalled some savvy advice a mentor once said to me, ‘you excel where your passion lies.’ I realized I lacked the fire in the belly.”

DSCN0828 cropped and resized-2When Hsu told his peers and mentors at Stanford he wanted to study infectious disease, Philip Pizzo, MD, former dean of the medical school and a specialist in oncology and infectious diseases, supported his decision. “I am very grateful to him,” Hsu said. “He probably doesn’t realize this, but he was a huge influence on where I am today after Stanford.”

Two years later, Hsu and his cohort of EIS officers, affectionately nicknamed “the Ebola Class,” learned the 2014 Ebola outbreak had just been classified as a Level 1 emergency. CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, visited Hsu’s class and personally asked them to take up the call to work on Ebola. Hsu’s cohort was a mix of physicians, nurses, veterinarians, and scientists with specialties ranging from malaria to violence prevention, but after Frieden’s visit, their professional interests no longer mattered. “We decided we were all working on Ebola in some capacity,” Hsu said.

Many of the EIS officers in Hsu’s Ebola class have completed one or two 30 to 90-day deployments to prevent and control Ebola in West African countries with widespread transmission (Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone), or in one of the other countries where Ebola occurred in the past. Hsu describes his disease fieldwork as part detective work and part disease control. “I investigated who was sick, what their symptoms were and who had contact with them,” Hsu said.

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Addiction, Media, Medicine and Society, Mental Health, Technology

Patient tells how social media helped her overcome the “shame” of her eating disorder

Patient tells how social media helped her overcome the "shame" of her eating disorder

3375657138_d025fc4092_bMany of us turn to our friends and families for encouragement when times are tough. So it’s no wonder that social media sites have also become important sources of emotional support for people with illnesses.

Recently, a story over on MindBodyGreen highlighted how one woman used Facebook as a tool to help her overcome the shame and deception that hampered her recovery from her eating disorder. As Lindsey Hall explains:

Two months into rehab, I was still struggling with letting go of the games of my eating disorder. Transitioning from in-patient to out, I’d been rapidly finding myself falling backwards instead of forwards.

Here I was, 24 years old, still living some days bagel by bagel, still opening the door to deception, and guilt and shame. I knew on some level that admitting to my eating disorder on social media would be a way for me to stop the show. I knew I needed to own this struggle in order to own all of myself, and to continue on my journey learning the art of self-acceptance.

As Hall describes in the story, her decision to make her eating disorder public on Facebook was a leap of faith with no guarantee that it was the right thing to do:

I’ll never really know what drove me to write that Facebook status, but I posted it anyway to the open arms of nearly 2,500 “friends” and family, to people that had met me once at a bar or sat next to on a plane. Having lived so long behind a smoke screen, I was ready to expose myself. I needed to feel bare, even while broken, in order to be able to clean my slate, and start from scratch in reconstructing my life.

The feedback Hall received from her gutsy post on Facebook and the subsequent blog posts and stories about her eating disorder haven’t always been positive, but as Hall explains, that wasn’t that point. Hall’s eating disorder is public information now, and this new level of accountability has helped her keep her eating habits on track.

Previously: Incorporating the family in helping teens overcome eating disordersA growing consensus for revamping anorexia nervosa treatmentPossible predictors of longer-term recovery from eating disordersGrieving on Facebook: A personal story and How patients use social media to foster support systems, connect with physicians
Photo by .craig

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