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In the News, Medical Education, Mental Health, Stanford News

An Rx for physician burnout

An Rx for physician burnout

artsy stethoscope - 250Burnout, which is characterized by emotional exhaustion, a sense of depersonalization and a lack of a sense of personal accomplishment, is on the rise among physicians and medical residents and students in the United States. A lengthy article (subscription required) published Friday in Time examines the growing problem and the movement to save physicians’ mental health:

Experts warn that the mental health of doctors is reaching the point of crisis—and the consequences of their unhappiness go far beyond their personal lives. Studies have linked burnout to an increase in unprofessional behavior and lower patient satisfaction. When patients are under the care of physicians with reduced empathy—which often comes with burnout—they have worse outcomes and adhere less to their doctors’ orders. It even takes people longer to recover when their doctor is down.

Many factors contribute to physician burnout, including long-hours, a high-pressure work environment, the stigma against weakness and mistreatment from higher-ranking physicians. Efforts are underway to change the culture of medicine and alleviate these sources of stress, and much of the story focuses on what’s happening here at Stanford:

In 2011, [Ralph Greco, MD, professor of surgery a Stanford,] Chaplain [Bruce Feldstein, MD,] and a few other colleagues, including [Arghavan Salles, MD, former chief resident of general surgery at Stanford], got together to discuss how to change things. “When people go somewhere new, they lose everything that was around them that supported them, and it’s very natural to doubt them- selves,” says Salles. “I had this idea that we could have sessions where people talk to each other, and then it wouldn’t be so lonely.”

They put together a program at Stanford to promote psychological well-being, physical health and mentoring. Every week, one of the six groups of surgery residents has a mandatory psychotherapy session with a psychologist. Each senior resident mentors a junior resident, and residents are given time for team bonding. Young doctors rarely have time to go see a doctor of their own, so the wellness team issues lists of doctors and dentists it recommends. And there’s now a refrigerator in the surgery residents’ lounge, stocked with healthy foods. They call the program Balance in Life.

“We knew we couldn’t necessarily prevent suicide—too complicated for us to solve it,” Greco says. “But we needed to feel we did everything we could do to prevent it, if we could.”

Previously: Stanford’s “time banking” program helps emergency room physicians avoid burnoutKeeping an even keel: Stanford surgery residents learn to balance work and lifeA call to action to improve balance and reduce stress in the lives of resident physicians and Program for residents reflects “massive change” in surgeon mentality
Photo by Lidor

Health and Fitness, Obesity, Pediatrics, Public Health

Taking breaks for physical activity may benefit children’s long-term health

Taking breaks for physical activity may benefit children’s long-term health

109320999_8b61257d14_zHere’s an eye-opening statistic: Children in the United States spend on average 6 hours per day sitting or reclining. As we head into the fall and winter months, it’s likely that the shorter, darker days and chilly weather will only add to our kids being more sedentary.

National exercise standards advocate for children getting at least 30 minutes of exercise daily to curb the risk of obesity, diabetes and other conditions. But for those days when achieving this goal isn’t possible, new research shows that short activity breaks can help offset a lack of exercise.

In the study (subscription required), researchers invited 28 healthy, normal-weight children to visit the National Institutes of Health on two separate occasions. During the first visit, participants were randomly assigned to two groups. One group watched TV, read or engaged in other sedentary activities for three hours; the other group alternated sitting with three minutes of moderate-intensity walking on a treadmill every 30 minutes for the three-hour period. On the return visit, the children switched groups. Each one took an oral glucose tolerance test at both visits. According to an NIH release:

On the days they walked, the children had blood glucose levels that were, on average, 7 percent lower than on the day they spent all 3 hours sitting. Their insulin levels were 32 percent lower.   Similarly, blood levels of free fatty acids — high levels of which are linked to type 2 diabetes — were also lower, as were levels of C-peptide, an indicator of how hard the pancreas is working to control blood sugar.

After the sessions, the children were allowed to choose their lunch from food items on a buffet table. Based on the nutrient content of each item, the researchers were able to calculate the calorie and nutrient content of what each child ate. The short, moderate-intensity walking sessions did not appear to stimulate the children to eat more than they ordinarily would, as the children consumed roughly the same amounts and kinds of foods after each of the sessions.

The study authors concluded that, if larger studies confirm their findings, interrupting periods of prolonged sitting with regular intervals of moderate-intensity walking might be an effective strategy for reducing children’s risk of diabetes and heart disease.

While regular walking breaks may not excite the average child, three-minute dance parties or stomping on bubbles are other options for getting kids out of their seat and moving.

Previously: Pediatrics group issues new recommendations for building strong bones in kids, Understanding the impact of sedentary behavior on children’s health and British government urging toddlers to ‘get physical’
Photo by Miika Silfverberg

Nutrition, Obesity, Research

A call to focus on the nutritional value of foods, rather than calorie counts

A call to focus on the nutritional value of foods, rather than calorie counts

10331709463_60f2188a69_zTo reduce obesity rates, cardiovascular risk and chronic diseases, ditch calorie counting and instead emphasize the nutritional content of foods. That’s the message from a group of British researchers in an editorial recently published in Open Heart.

Drawing on past scientific evidence, the authors argue that physicians, patients and society’s focus on low-calorie foods and diets has resulted in a sacrifice of good nutrition and failed to improve overall public health. According to a press release:

Daily consumption of a sugary drink (150 calories) is associated with a significantly increased risk of type 2 diabetes whereas daily consumption of a handful of nuts (30 g of walnuts, 15 g of almonds and 15 g hazelnuts) or four tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil (around 500 calories) is associated with a significantly reduced risk of heart attack and stroke.

It has been estimated that increasing nut consumption by two servings a week could stave off 90,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease in the US alone.

And the Action for Health in Diabetes trial shows that a low calorie diet on top of increased physical activity in patients with type 2 diabetes was not associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular death despite significant weight loss and a monitoring period of 13.5 years, [the authors] point out.

“It is time to stop counting calories, and time to instead promote good nutrition and dietary changes that can rapidly and substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality. The evidence indeed supports the mantra that ‘food can be the most powerful form of medicine or the slowest form of poison’,” they write.

Previously: The trouble with the current calorie-counting system, Homemade: Community-based project teaches how to cook for health and Cooked food, calorie counts and food labels
Photo by Mariya Chorna

Aging, Global Health, In the News, Public Health, Research

As life expectancy rises worldwide, many are living longer with illness and disability

10812180384_18496a55f3_zGood news: Average life expectancy has continued to climb over the past two decades. The downside is that those extra years are often marked by chronic disease or disability, according to a new analysis published in the Lancet.

In the study, an international team of researchers examined fatal and nonfatal health loss across countries in an effort to help direct global-health policies to improve longevity and quality of life regardless of where a person lives.

HealthDay reports:

The analysis of data from 188 countries found that life expectancy for both sexes increased from just over 65 years in 1990 to 71.5 years in 2013, while healthy life expectancy rose from almost 57 years to slightly more than 62 years.

“The world has made great progress in health, but now the challenge is to invest in finding more effective ways of preventing or treating the major causes of illness and disability,” study author Theo Vos, a professor at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle, said in a journal news release.

The rise in overall life expectancy is due to significant declines in illness and death caused by HIV/AIDS and malaria, the researchers said, along with major advances in combating infectious diseases, nutritional deficiencies, and mother and baby health problems.

Earlier this year, Laura Carstensen, PhD, director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, spoke at the Big Data in Biomedicine conference about modern society’s gains in life expectancy and called it an “unprecedented” time in history. During her presentation, she presented data on the current aging population and what aging might look like in the future.

Previously: A look at aging and longevity in this “unprecedented” time in history, “Are we there yet?” Exploring the promise, and the hype, of longevity research and Living loooooooonger: A conversation on longevity
Photo by jennie-o

Research, Science

Short and sweet: Research papers with succinct titles cited more often

Short and sweet: Research papers with succinct titles cited more often

As a burgeoning journalist, I was often coached to cut unnecessary words. College professors mandated that story ledes be short and snappy and never exceed 35 words in length. When I began working at a daily newspaper, my editors were constantly condensing paragraphs and reminding me that “it takes more skill to write short than it does to write long.”

So I was interested to read a Nature article about new research showing that scientific studies with shorter titles receive more citations. Boer Deng writes:

Adrian Letchford and his colleagues at the University of Warwick in Coventry, UK, analysed the titles of 140,000 of the most highly cited peer-reviewed papers published between 2007 and 2013 as listed on Scopus, a research-paper database. They compared the lengths of the papers’ titles with the number of times each paper was cited by other peer-reviewed papers— a statistic sometimes used as a crude measure of importance.

As they report in Royal Society Open Science, “journals which publish papers with shorter titles receive more citations per paper”.

The impetus for the current study came from a desire to pen better papers, says Letchford, and to see whether good writing is rewarded in research. “As scientists, we’re all cursed,” when it comes to writing, Letchford says, as researchers hone their specialised knowledge but often cannot explain themselves to readers outside their own field.

While some quoted in the article agreed that concise titles can offer advantages, including increasing appeal to outside audiences, John Ioannidis, MD, DSc, director of the Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford, questioned whether the findings were conclusive. He said, “I will continue to struggle finding appropriate titles for my papers without worrying about whether the title length may affect their citations.”

Previously: A conversation with John Ioannidis, “the superhero poised to save” medical research, Shake up research rewards to improve accuracy, says Stanford’s John Ioannidis and John Ioannidis discusses the popularity of his paper examining the reliability of scientific research

Medical Education, Medical Schools

Using “spaced repetition” and other learning strategies to better retain medical school knowledge

Using "spaced repetition" and other learning strategies to better retain medical school knowledge

8747269303_eb647f98e2_zMany have described the medical school experience as “drinking from a firehose” of knowledge. Over on the Wing of Zock, radiology resident Peter Wei, MD, and MD/PhD student Alex Chamessian explain how they leveraged psychological research to develop new study techniques and better retain information as medical students.

To break the cycle of learning and quickly forgetting, they began using a technique known as “spaced repetition,” where material is regularly reviewed according to set schedule. They write:

At first, a newly learned fact is reviewed often; as time goes on, and the memory becomes deeply ingrained, it diminishes. In that way, you only have to study each fact exactly when the program predicts you’re likely to forget it – an enormous time savings. While cramming can buy you some short-term learning, if you want to retain information from medical school into clinical practice, spaced repetition is the way to go.

So, with this knowledge in hand, we and some of our classmates started using free, open-source flashcard apps, such as Anki and Mnemnosyne, which incorporate spaced repetition. Our understanding of the psychological literature also taught us the best practices for studying, and what sorts of resources to use for each course.

We talked with our classmates, who adopted parts of this methodology for themselves and offered useful suggestions to streamline it further. Pretty soon our class was teaching these techniques to the incoming first years, and a year later, that class started reaching out to the new incoming first years. And sure enough, many of us did very well on the USMLE step exams and found that had a firm grasp of clinical knowledge once we hit the wards; our studying yielded much better results than we could have expected otherwise.

In an effort to help other medical students learn more efficiently, Wei and Chamessian wrote the book “Learning Medicine, an Evidence-Based Guide” detailing the spaced repetition method and other learning strategies.

At Stanford, educators developed a new online learning initiative to re-imagine medical education using the “flipped classroom” model. The Stanford Medicine Interactive Learning Initiatives aims to make better use of the fixed amount of educational time available to train doctors and help students learn more efficiently.

Previously: Using the “flipped classroom” model to bring medical education into the 21st century, Flip it up: How the flipped classroom boosts faculty interest in teaching and A closer look at using the “flipped classroom” model at the School of Medicine
Photo by EdTech Stanford University School of Medicine

Aging, Podcasts, Public Health, Research, Stanford News

Stanford doctor on a mission to empower patients to talk about end-of-life issues

Stanford doctor on a mission to empower patients to talk about end-of-life issues

Each year, about 2.6 million people die in America. Although past research has shown that 7 out of 10 of us prefer to die at home, an estimated 70 percent of people die in the hospital, nursing home or long-term care facility. The disconnect between where people die and how they would prefer to spend their final days often happens because loved ones and doctors don’t know their end-of-life wishes. Only 20 to 30 percent of Americans have completed advanced directives.

It’s not easy to talk about death, and the terminology used in advance directives can be confusing. I remember having to complete the form with my husband shortly before the birth of my first child. Despite having been in a relationship for 12 year, we had never discussed end-of-life issues. Imagining the scenarios that might lead to either of us being in a life-threatening situation was an extremely emotional exercise — especially as we awaited our son’s arrival. Did we want doctors to use every intervention possible to save our life? What if it meant sacrificing our quality of life? Did we want to be on life support? If so, how long?

We eventually turned to a friend, who was also a physician, to help us sort through the process. But we didn’t talk to our own primary care doctors and, to this day, our doctors have never asked us if we have an advance directive or about our end-of-life preferences. And this isn’t unusual. Recent research from VJ Periyakoil, MD, director of Stanford’s Palliative Care Education and Training, shows that most doctors struggle to talk with patients about what’s important to them in their final days, particularly if the patient’s ethnicity is different than their own.

In the latest 1:2:1 podcast, Periyakoil discusses her study findings and why it’s critical for all adults to complete an advance directive and initiate a conversation about their end-of-life wishes with their doctor and family. To get these conversations started and help patients navigate the emotionally-charged process, she launched the Stanford Letter Project, which provides templates in a range of languages asking patients simple questions about how they want to die.

Listen to the full podcast to learn more about the project and hear from Stanford Letter Project users about how they want to spend their final days.

Previously: How would you like to die? Tell your doctor in a letterIn honor of National Healthcare Decisions Day: A reminder for patients to address end-of-life issues, Study: Doctors would choose less aggressive end-of-life care for themselves and On a mission to transform end-of-life care

Aging, Research, Sleep

Having trouble sleeping? Research suggests spending more time outdoors

Having trouble sleeping? Research suggests spending more time outdoors

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Raise your hand if you didn’t sleep well last night. Findings published in the latest issue of Preventive Medicine show that increasing the amount of time you spend outdoors can improve sleep quality, particularly for men and people over the age of 65.

To better understand the relationship between insufficient sleep and outdoor space, researchers analyzed data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which surveyed of more than 250,000 adults in the United States. This information was paired with data from a U.S. Department of Agriculture index that scores the country’s geographical areas for natural amenities, using hours of sunlight, an important factor in regulating a person’s circadian rhythm, and temperature. According to a release:

For men, the relationship between sleep and exposure to green space was much stronger than for women. And males and females 65 and over found nature to be a potent sleep aid, [Diana Grigsby-Toussaint, PhD, said.]

Grigsby-Toussaint noted that living near green landscapes is associated with higher levels of physical activity and that exercise in turn predicts beneficial sleep patterns.

The finding should be a boon for people who are having trouble sleeping as they age. “If there is a way for persons over 65 to spend time in nature, it would improve the quality of their sleep—and their quality of life—if they did so,” Grigsby-Toussaint said.

Researchers added that the findings underscored the importance of preserving nature and providing safe access to nature in urban development.

Previously: Green roofs are not just good for the environment, they boost productivity, study shows, Nature is good for you, right? and Out-of-office autoreply: Reaping the benefits of nature
Photo by Garry Knight

Ask Stanford Med, Health and Fitness, Nutrition, Obesity, Precision health, Stanford News

A Stanford physician takes a precision health approach to living a healthier lifestyle

A Stanford physician takes a precision health approach to living a healthier lifestyle

timthumbNearly 70 percent of Americans ages 20 or older are overweight or obese, including Larry Chu, MD, a Stanford anesthesiologist and executive director of Medicine X.

Chu, who has struggled with his weight for over a decade, knew he was overweight but didn’t think it was a serious threat to his health. This changed during a routine doctor’s visit. As he explains in a podcast, Chu was shocked to learn that lab results showed he was at high risk for stroke and heart attack. He decided to take action and launch precision:me, a personal blog project chronicling the first 90 days of his journey to live a healthier lifestyle.

Why most of us try to slim down by shunning carbs, stepping up our exercise routines and secretly weighing ourselves each morning, Chu is tracking his health data using a range of gadgets and other tools and sharing the every detail of his progress publicly on his blog. He is also posting photos and podcasts.

Below Chu discusses why he choose to take this unique approach to achieve his weight-loss goals, how he hopes it will inform the broader conversation about obesity and its potential to demonstrate the value of digital tools in enhancing personal health.

What was the catalyst for precision:me?

One of the misconceptions about obesity is that it is a lifestyle disease and if people would only eat less and move more they would be fit. In my case, this is a health journey I have been struggling with since my residency training at Stanford. Using precision health tools to address obesity is a new approach that we are focusing on in precision:me. Stanford has recently announced exciting plans for precision health. I thought it was a good time to share how we at Medicine X see precision health as a novel approach that individuals and their providers can use today to tailor precise and individualized care. It is a very practical and personal dive into developing and implementing a precise plan to modify my diet and metabolic profile to forestall the development of more significant chronic diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease, using data and analytics provided through digital health tools and expert medical, nutritional and fitness collaborators.

Why did you decide to make all of your health data available online for public consumption?

It was an easy and difficult decision at the same time. There is incredible stigma associated with obesity, which we discuss on the precision:me website. Being overweight or obese is a subject that many of us find difficult to talk about. Sharing information can make it easier to start a dialogue. Advances in precision health at Stanford and around the world will depend upon patients sharing their personal health data in a secure and protected fashion with researchers. By sharing my data with the public, I hope to help everyone see what it is like to live with obesity as a condition, break down misconceptions and misperceptions about the disease, and help shine a light on the value of sharing data to help others.

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Medical Education, Microbiology, NIH, Public Health, Research, Videos

Investigating the human microbiome: “We’re only just beginning and there is so much more to explore”

Investigating the human microbiome: "We’re only just beginning and there is so much more to explore"

The more scientists learn about the body’s community of bacteria, the more they believe that the human microbiome plays an important role in our overall health. For example, research published earlier this week suggests that a specific pattern of high bacterial diversity in the vagina during pregnancy increases a woman’s risk of giving birth prematurely.

Despite these and other insightful findings, researchers have a long way to go to understand the composition of our internal microbial ecosystems. As Keisha Findley, a postdoctoral fellow at the National Human Genome Research Institute says in the above video, “We’re only just beginning and there is so much more to explore.”

Findley and colleagues are working to survey all of the fungi and bacteria living on healthy human skin and develop a baseline to determine how these microbial communities may influence skin conditions such as acne, athlete’s foot, skin ulcers and eczema. Watch the LabTV video above to learn more about her work.

Previously: Drugs for bugs: Industry seeks small molecules to target, tweak and tune up our gut microbes, A look at our disappearing microbes, Exploring the microbes that inhabit our bodies and Diverse microbes discovered in healthy lungs shed new light on cystic fibrosis
Via NIH Director’s Blog

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