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Events, Medicine X, Mental Health, Stanford News, Technology

Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient

Medicine X spotlights mental health, medical team of the future and the “no-smartphone” patient

Larry_ChuInnovative thinkers and thought leaders engaged in using emerging technologies to enhance health-care delivery and advance the practice of medicine will gather here in early September for Stanford Medicine X.

As Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine, comments in a release today, Larry Chu, MD, associate professor of anesthesia at Stanford and executive director of the conference, “has made this the go-to event for e-patients, physicians and innovators who want to get together to map out the future of health care.” Chu also notes that the conference  “has distinguished itself through a singular commitment to inclusivity and by finding new ways to bring every voice and perspective into important conversations about health care.”

Now in its third year, Medicine X is building on this inclusive spirit by exploring a variety of new themes during its 2014 program. More from our release:

This year’s program will spotlight the relationship between physical and mental well-being with three breakout panels. Psychologist Ann Becker-Shutte, PhD, will moderate a session on how mental health affects overall health. A conversation about emerging technologies in mental health will be led by Malay Gandhi, managing director of Rock Health, a business accelerator for health-care technology startup companies. Additionally, patient advocate Sarah Kucharski will direct a discussion about depression caused by chronic disease and about coping through online communities.

“Mental health is imperative to address in the overall conversation about the future of health care,” said Chu. “We need to be thinking about the health of the whole person, not just a patient’s individual symptoms or disease.”

The three-day event will also feature panels on what the medical team of the future may look like; how patients with chronic diseases can use self-tracking tools to improve their health and support one another; ways for the pharmaceutical industry to partner with patients in the drug discovery and clinical trial process; and opportunities to connect with “no-smartphone” patients — those who don’t have the access or resources to fully engage with health-enhancing technologies.

Keynote speakers for this year’s conference, being held Sept. 5-7, include Daniel Siegel, MD, clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California-Los Angeles; Barron Lerner, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and population health at New York University School of Medicine; and Charles Ornstein, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and senior reporter at ProPublica.

For information about the program or to  register the Medicine X website. Last year’s conference sold out, and space is limited for this year’s event.

Previously: Medicine X Live! to host Hangout on design thinking for patient engagement, Quite the reach: Stanford Medicine X set record for most number of tweets at a health-care conference, Videos from Medicine X now available and “You belong here”: A recap of Stanford Medicine X
Photo of Larry Chu by StanfordMedicineX

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Cardiovascular Medicine, Research, Videos

Researchers capture detailed three-dimensional images of cardiac dynamics in zebrafish

Researchers capture detailed three-dimensional images of cardiac dynamics in zebrafish

The stunning video above depicts a reconstructed beating heart of a zebrafish embryo with the muscle layer shown in red and the endothelium highlighted in blue. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Germany created the video using a new three-dimensional imaging technique, which holds the promise of leading to a better “understanding of congenital heart defects as well in future experiments on cardiac function and development”. As explained in a release:

[Researchers] developed a high-speed, selective plane illumination microscope that manages to do just that. By gently illuminating the fish heart with a thin light sheet and observing the emitted fluorescence with a fast and sensitive camera the researchers have achieved fast, non-invasive imaging of labelled heart tissue. The process involves taking multiple movies, each covering individual planes of the heart (movie stacks), then using the correlations between the individual planes to generate a synchronised, dynamic 3D image of the beating heart.

“These renderings allow us to further follow characteristic structures of the heart throughout the cardiac cycle,” says Michaela Mickoleit, PhD student who performed the experiments in [Jan Huisken's] lab.

Via Medgadget
Previously: An advancement in optogenetics: Switching off cells with light now as easy as switching them on and New York Times profiles Stanford’s Karl Deisseroth and his work in optogenetics

Medical Apps, Sleep, Technology

Can sleep trackers help you get a better night’s rest?

Can sleep trackers help you get a better night's rest?

As the number of self-tracking gadgets grows, many people are beginning to experiment with monitoring lifestyle habits in an effort to improve their health. In fact, seven in ten American adults say they track at least one health indicator, according to data from the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project. But there has been some concern about the accuracy of such technology.

A recent CBS News segment took a closer look at the effectiveness of sleep trackers and outlined the differences in information collected by the devices and data collected by sleep specialists in a clinical setting. Stanford sleep expert Michelle Primeau, MD, also commented, “The reason why these devices are so good is [using them] puts greater emphasis on sleep.”

Previously: Why sleeping in on the weekends may not be beneficial to your health, The high price of interrupted sleep on your health, Exploring the benefit of sleep apps and Designing the next generation of sleep devices

Medical Education, Rural Health, Stanford News

Stanford internships provide Bay Area students with work experience, opportunity to discover passions

Stanford internships provide Bay Area students with work experience, opportunity to discover passions

14093-internyu_newsThis summer high school students from around the Bay Area are interning at labs and departments across Stanford. A recent Stanford Report story highlights the type of projects students are working on and how the internships provide them with valuable work experience and the opportunity to discover their passion. From the article:

Palo Alto High School student Catherine Yu [pictured to the right], for example, is interning at the Stanford Blood Center in the immunology and pathology lab. She described her task as gathering data to help her supervisor’s research project.

“Every intern is assigned to a supervisor who is working on an experiment, which will hopefully be turned into a paper submitted for a journal,” said Yu, who will be a senior in September. “My work consists of separating blood into T cells, monocytes, dendritic cells, and then culturing them together; it’s very neat.”

Yu said being the only high school student in her lab presents her with a series of challenges.

“It’s definitely a different dynamic where they expect you to learn a lot of information at a very fast pace,” Yu said. “I have to stay on my toes so I don’t fall behind.”

Previously: Internships expose local high-schoolers to STEM careers and academic life, Residential learning program offers undergrads a new approach to scientific inquiry, The “transformative experience” of working in a Stanford stem-cell lab and Stanford’s RISE program gives high-schoolers a scientific boost
Photo by L.A. Cicero

In the News, Nutrition, Research

How much caffeine is really in one cup of coffee?

How much caffeine is really in one cup of coffee?

coffee_beansPrevious research has shown that regularly drinking coffee could offer a number of health benefits, including reducing prostate cancer risk, improving symptoms related to Parkinson’s disease, staving off the development of Alzheimer’s, decreasing diabetes risk and providing antioxidants.

But too much caffeine can make you jittery, disrupt your sleep and, potentially, shorten your life span. So it’s often recommended that you drink coffee in moderation, which is defined as two or three eight-ounce cups of brewed or drip coffee.

The problem with recommending a certain number of cups, reports Scientific American, is that new research shows the caffeine and caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) content can vary greatly depending on the type and preparation of the coffee. From the piece:

Results showed that the caffeine-to-CQA ratio in espressos ranged from 0.7–11, depending on the preparation conditions. With serving volumes from 13–104ml, it’s no wonder that Crozier says ‘cup of coffee is an exceedingly variable unit. To estimate health benefits using cups may be very difficult,’ – and inadvisable in epidemiological studies.

But what are CQAs? Beans contain various (poly)phenols, including 3-, 4- and 5-O-caffeoylquinic acids, the main phenolic compounds in coffee. Epidemiological studies have suggested the link between the lower risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and endometrial and hepatocellular cancer in habitual coffee consumers might be due to the presence of CQAs in coffee. They sound like super-compounds, but that’s a big ‘might’, and research continues.

Whilst the biological effects of CQAs are uncertain, one thing we do know about them is they are more sensitive to roasting than caffeine. The bean or blend also affects the caffeine-to-CQA ratio. Arabica and Robusta are the most common bean types and the latter contains twice as much caffeine as the former.

The article highlights the need to better inform consumers about the actual amount of caffeine in coffee and the need for more research on the health benefits of coffee.

Previously: How the body’s natural defenses help protect cells from toxins in everyday foods and flavorings, What is coffee?, For new moms, coffee scores a point: Caffeine doesn’t seem to interfere with baby’s sleep in study and Does coffee lower the risk of prostate cancer?
Photo by Nina Matthews

Health Disparities, Men's Health, Public Health, Research, Stanford News, Women's Health

Why it’s critical to study the impact of gender differences on diseases and treatments

man_womanWhen it comes to diagnosing disease and choosing a course of treatment, gender is a significant factor. In a Stanford BeWell Q&A, Marcia Stefanick, PhD, a professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center and co-director of the Stanford Women & Sex Differences in Medicine Center, discusses why gender medicine research benefits both sexes and why physicians need to do a better job of taking sex difference into consideration when make medical decisions.

Below Stefanick explains why a lack of understanding about the different clinical manifestations of prevalent diseases in women and men can lead to health disparities:

…Because we may have primarily studied a particular disease in only one of the sexes, usually males (and most basic research is done in male rodents), the resulting treatments are most often based on that one sex’s physiology. Such treatments in the other sex might not be appropriate. One example is sleep medication. Ambien is the prescription medicine recently featured on the TV show, 60 Minutes. Reporters found out that women were getting twice the dose they should because they had been given the men’s doses; consequently, the women were falling asleep at the wheel and having accidents. Physicians had not taken into account that women are smaller and their livers’ metabolize drugs differently than do men’s. Some women have responded by reducing their own medication dosages, and yet that practice of self-adjusting is not the safest way to proceed, either.

Previously: A call to advance research on women’s health issues, Exploring sex differences in the brain and Women underrepresented in heart studies
Photo by Mary Anne Enriquez

Aging, Chronic Disease, Public Health, Research

How multiple chronic conditions are affecting older Americans’ life expectancy

old_coupleOne in four adults in the United States has two or more chronic conditions, according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And, findings published in the August issue of Medical Care show that the burden of multiple chronic diseases could explain why life expectancy increases among elderly Americans are slowing.

In the study (subscription required), researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health analyzed a nationally representative sample of 1.4 million Medicare beneficiaries. According to a release:

The analysis found that, on average, a 75-year-old American woman with no chronic conditions will live 17.3 additional years (that’s to more than 92 years old). But a 75-year-old woman with five chronic conditions will only live, on average, to the age of 87, and a 75-year-old woman with 10 or more chronic conditions will only live to the age of 80. Women continue to live longer than men, while white people live longer than black people.

It’s not just how many diseases you have, but also what disease that matters. At 67, an individual with heart disease is estimated to live an additional 21.2 years on average, while someone diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease is only expected to live 12 additional years.

On average, life expectancy is reduced by 1.8 years with each additional chronic condition, the researchers found. But while the first disease shaves off just a fraction of a year off life expectancy for older people, the impact grows as the diseases add up.

Previously: Americans are living longer, but are we healthier in our golden years?, Longevity gene tied to nerve stem cell regeneration, say Stanford researchers, Study shows regular physical activity, even modest amounts, can add years to your life and TED Talk with Laura Carstensen shows older adults have an edge on happiness
Photo by Marcel Oosterwijk

Public Health, Research, Sleep

Why sleeping in on the weekends may not be beneficial to your health

Why sleeping in on the weekends may not be beneficial to your health

tired_072214Many of us, myself included, use the weekends to pay off the sleep debt we accrued during the work week. However, excessive sleeping can often leave us feeling more fatigued. A piece published today on Wired Science examines this phenomenon and discusses why clocking extra hours of shut-eye doesn’t necessarily benefit our health. Nick Stockton writes:

Oversleeping feels so much like a hangover that scientists call it sleep drunkenness. But, unlike the brute force neurological damage caused by alcohol, your misguided attempt to stock up on rest makes you feel sluggish by confusing the part of your brain that controls your body’s daily cycle.

Your internal rhythms are set by your circadian pacemaker, a group of cells clustered in the hypothalamus, a primitive little part of the brain that also controls hunger, thirst, and sweat. Primarily triggered by light signals from your eye, the pacemaker figures out when it’s morning and sends out chemical messages keeping the rest of the cells in your body on the same clock.

Scientists believe that the pacemaker evolved to tell the cells in our bodies how to regulate their energy on a daily basis. When you sleep too much, you’re throwing off that biological clock, and it starts telling the cells a different story than what they’re actually experiencing, inducing a sense of fatigue. You might be crawling out of bed at 11am, but your cells started using their energy cycle at seven. This is similar to how jet lag works.

The article goes on to explain that past research has shown that, “If you’re oversleeping on the regular, you could be putting yourself at risk for diabetes, heart disease, and obesity.”

Previously: The high price of interrupted sleep on your health, Examining how sleep quality and duration affect cognitive function as we age, What are the consequences of sleep deprivation? and BBC study: Oh, what a difference an hour of sleep makes
Photo by Stephen Poff

Parenting, Sleep, Women's Health

What other cultures can teach us about managing postpartum sleep deprivation

What other cultures can teach us about managing postpartum sleep deprivation

New_mom_072114Prior to becoming a mom, I felt fully confident that caring for a newborn would be less demanding than, or at least equal to, the physically grueling trainings from my college soccer days or my sleepless year of graduate school. But I soon learned that both of these experiences paled in comparison to the exhaustion I encountered after the arrival of my 8-pound-plus bundle of joy. So I was interested to read a recent Huffington Post blog entry from the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine examining how mothers in other countries cope with postpartum sleep deprivation.

In the entry, Mara Cvejic, MD, a neurologist at the University of Florida and former sleep medicine fellow at Stanford, notes that although sleep deprivation can profoundly affect cognitive function and mood, the brain of a postpartum mom is actually growing. She writes:

… despite all the formidable evidence of sleep deprivation in the everyday person, the scientific evidence of what happens to the postpartum brain is positively astounding — it thrives. A study published by the National Institutes of Health in 2010 actually shows that a mother’s brain grows from just 2-4 weeks to 3-4 months post delivery without any significant learning activities. The gray matter of the parietal lobe, pre-frontal cortex, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, and amygdala all form new connections and enlarge to a small degree. The imaging study confirms what animal studies have shown in the past — that these brain regions responsible for complex emotional judgment and decision-making actually bulk up with use. Rationale to the study shows that mothers who have positive interactions with their offspring — soothing, nurturing, feeding, and caring for them — are performing a mental exercise of sorts. Their learned coping skills in the face of novel child-rearing actually muscularize their brain.

She goes on to outline how new moms from Bulgaria to Sweden, and everywhere in between, turn to “hammocks, spa treatments, hired help, warm foods, arctic cradles, and cardboard” to cope with a lack of sleep. Personally, I’m in favor of Americans adopting this Malaysian tradition:

Food and warmth are also a focus of the Malaysian confinement of pantang. Steeped in the belief that the women’s life force is her fertile womb, she undergoes a 44-day period of internment to focus on relaxation, hot stone massage, lulur (full body exfoliation), herbal baths, and hot compresses. Typically a bidan, what can only be described as a live-in midwife and nanny combined, is hired to attend on the new mother. This is sometimes a family member, such as her mother or mother-in-law.

Previously: The high price of interrupted sleep on your health, What are the consequences of sleep deprivation? and Study: Parents may not be as sleep-deprived as they think
Photo by sean dreilinger

Patient Care, Pediatrics, Research, Technology

How virtual visits can help children in the hospital reduce stress, speed up recovery

How virtual visits can help children in the hospital reduce stress, speed up recovery

Past research has shown that patients in the hospital experience less nerve-related pain and recover more quickly when they have visitors. Now findings recently published in Pediatrics show that virtual visits are equally beneficial.

In the study, researchers at the University of California, Davis Children’s Hospital analyzed the effectiveness of Family-Link, a program that provides webcams, laptops and Internet access to pediatric patients. Researchers assessed the anxiety levels of roughly 230 children who used the teleconferencing service and 135 who did not when they were admitted to the hospital and discharged using the Parent-Guardian Stress Survey. According to a Futurity post:

Overall, children who used Family-Link felt less stressed compared to those who did not use the program. The effect was even more pronounced for children who lived closer to the hospital and had shorter hospitalizations. This group experienced a 37 percent stress reduction when using Family-Link.

“This study shows that we have another tool to help children during their hospital stays,” says Yang. “The improvement in stress scores shows that Family-Link is really helping many children and might possibly be improving outcomes.”

Previously: Using the iPad to connect ill newborns, parents

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