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Research, Sports, Stanford News

New research offers comprehensive picture of the lingering effects of sports injuries

New research offers comprehensive picture of the lingering effects of sports injuries

15403-injuries_newsIn an effort to better understand the lasting impact of sports injuries, Stanford physicians collaborated with the university’s athletic department to enroll nearly 1,700 student athletes in an electronic pre-participation evaluation (ePPE) program and track their health over a three-year period.

During the course of the study, which was published in the current issue of The American Journal of Sports Medicine, the researchers documented 3,126 injuries (1,473 for women and 1,653 for men) that caused athletes to miss an average of 31 days of competition each. Musculoskeletal injuries were the most common, but athletes also suffered from concussions, eating disorders and infectious illnesses. As reported in a Stanford news story today, the research provides new insights into the lasting impact of injuries in greater detail than ever:

Among the findings, 11 percent of the students still suffered symptoms from a previous injury at the time of their next ePPE. Head injuries accounted for 9 percent of all injuries. Although only 3 percent of women reported a diagnosed eating disorder, 15 percent of all women reported a history of stress fractures, which can be associated with low body fat, from either disordered eating or overtraining.

[Gordon Matheson, MD, PhD, who led the study,] said that although the data are eye-opening, interpreting the material and deciding what is particularly meaningful may be an even bigger effort.

“We know that student-athletes have a lot of injuries from sport participation. But unless we have pooled, aggregate data like this, it’s difficult to measure trends and spot areas of concern applied to prevention,” said Matheson.

Researchers hope to partner with other universities to expand their data set and learn more about why some players are symptomatic at the time of follow-up evaluations and, ultimately, help make sports safer.

Previously: Female high-school athletes suffer more overuse injuries than their male counterparts, Director of Stanford Runner’s Injury Clinic discusses advances in treating six common running injuries, Lingering effects of injuries sideline many former college athletes later in life and Sports medicine specialists, educators endorse checklist to reduce injuries among youth athletes
Photo by Andrey Popov/Shutterstock

Health and Fitness, Pediatrics, Research, Sports

Female high-school athletes suffer more overuse injuries than their male counterparts

Female high-school athletes suffer more overuse injuries than their male counterparts

When I was younger, the prevailing parenting advice regarding athletics and children was to identify a sport your child would enjoy early on and have them focus on it throughout adolescent so she would have a competitive edge. Which is how I ended up playing on a boys soccer team at the age of five — there were no all-girls soccer teams in Austin, Texas in 1983. Soccer continued to be my sole sport throughout high school and college. Eventually, I had to give it up because the constant ankle injuries I endured meant I spent more time in rehab mode than training mode.

Never once did a physician or a trainer suspect that the injuries were related to overuse, despite the long hours I logged on running paths, in the weight room and on the field. So I was interested to read about recent research showing that girls are at a much higher risk than boys when it comes to overuse injuries in high-school sports.

In the study, researchers at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center reviewed 3,000 male and female injury cases over a seven year period across 20 high-school sports including soccer, volleyball, gymnastics and lacrosse. According to a release:

[Researchers] found the highest rate of overuse injuries occurred in girls track (3.82), followed by girls field hockey (2.93) and girls lacrosse (2.73). Overuse injuries in boys were most found in swimming and diving (1.3).

“These young people spend more time playing sports both in competition and in practice. So, there’s a correlation there between the amount of time that they’re playing and the increased incidence of injuries,” said [Thomas Best, MD, PhD,] who is also a professor and Pomerene chair in Ohio State’s department of family medicine.

The participation and intensity of high school athletics has increased over the past decade. According to Best, some high school athletes spend more than 18 hours a week participating in athletics and many participate in multiple sports concurrently.

Watch the clip above to learn more about researchers’ findings and recommendations.

Previously: Researchers call for improvements to health screenings for female college athletes and Stanford physician discusses prevalence of overuse injuries among college athletes

Big data, BigDataMed15, Chronic Disease, Genetics, Videos

Parents turn to data after son is diagnosed with ultra-rare disease

Parents turn to data after son is diagnosed with ultra-rare disease

Keynote talks and presentations from the 2015 Big Data in Biomedicine conference at Stanford are now available on the Stanford YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to improve the practice of medicine and enhance human health, we’re featuring a selection of the videos on Scope.

Four years ago, Matthew Might, PhD, and his wife, Christina, learned that their son Bertrand was the first person to be diagnosed with ultra-rare genetic disorder called N-Glycanase Disorder. At the 2015 Big Data in Biomedicine conference at Stanford, Might recounted the story of his son’s medical odyssey and explained how a team of Duke University researchers used whole-exome sequencing, which is a protein-focused variant of whole-genome sequencing, on himself, his wife and Bertrand to arrive at his son’s diagnosis.

Watch the video above to find out how Might and his family, who turned a deaf ear to doctors’ advice that nothing could be done for their son, harnessed the power of the Internet to identify 35 more patients with the same disorder and are now leading the charge in helping scientists better understand the disorder.

Previously: Nobel Laureate Michael Levitt explains why “biology is information rich” at Big Data in Biomedicine, At Big Data in Biomedicine, Stanford’s Lloyd Minor focuses on precision health, Experts at Big Data in Biomedicine: Bigger, better datasets and technology will benefit patients, On the move: Big Data in Biomedicine goes mobile with discussion on mHealth and Big Data in Biomedicine panelists: Genomics’ future is bright

Events, Health and Fitness, Sports, Stanford News, Videos

Stanford Football team physician shares tips for staying healthy while working out

Stanford Football team physician shares tips for staying healthy while working out

Last month, more than 750 people gathered on the Stanford Medicine campus for the annual Health Matters event. There, Jason Dragoo, MD, team physician for Stanford Football and the U.S. Olympic Committee, delivered a talk about preventing injuries and improving fitness performance. As he explains in the above video, he and colleagues dramatically changed the conditioning program for football players over the last five years: gone is the traditional weight room packed with machines and racks and in its place is a training facility stocked with kettle bells, Pilates equipment, medicine balls, wooden sticks and core boards. As a result, the injury rate dropped more than 70 percent and the team’s success has skyrocketed. 

Watch Dragoo’s full presentation and learn how you can apply the workout tactics employed by Stanford Football to avoid injury and improve your own exercise regimen. And check out the Stanford Medicine YouTube channel for more Health Matters videos, including:

Previously: Stanford Medicine’s Health Matters event, in pictures and Stanford’s Health Matters happening on Saturday

Big data, BigDataMed15, Videos

Nobel Laureate Michael Levitt explains why “biology is information rich” at Big Data in Biomedicine

Nobel Laureate Michael Levitt explains why "biology is information rich" at Big Data in Biomedicine

Keynote talks and presentations from the 2015 Big Data in Biomedicine conference at Stanford are now available on the Stanford YouTube channel. To continue the discussion of how big data can be harnessed to improve the practice of medicine and enhance human health, we’re featuring a selection of the videos on Scope.

In 2013, Michael Levitt, PhD, professor of structural biology at the Stanford, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems.” His work focuses on theoretical, computer-aided analysis of the protein, DNA and RNA molecules responsible for life at its most fundamental level.

During his keynote at last month’s Big Data in Biomedicine conference, Levitt spoke about big data in computational structural biomedicine and told the audience that “biology is information rich.” Watch his full presentation above to learn more about big data in biology, computer simulations in biomolecules and medical applications of molecular simulation.

Previously: At Big Data in Biomedicine, Stanford’s Lloyd Minor focuses on precision health, At Big Data in Biomedicine, Nobel laureate Michael Levitt and others talk computing and crowdsourcing, Experts at Big Data in Biomedicine: Bigger, better datasets and technology will benefit patients, On the move: Big Data in Biomedicine goes mobile with discussion on mHealth and Big Data in Biomedicine panelists: Genomics’ future is bright

Stanford News

Stanford Medicine magazine earns national awards

Stanford Medicine magazine earns national awards

heart in SM magPlease join me in a round of applause for Stanford Medicine magazine for recently winning six awards in a national competition, including top prize in the category of “best articles of the year.”

The publication earned a platinum, three golds, a silver and a bronze in the 2015 Circle of Excellence Awards Program, a contest held by the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education, or CASE. The magazine is produced by the School of Medicine’s Office of Communication & Public Affairs and edited by Rosanne Spector.

As my colleague Susan Ipaktchian writes in a news story detailing the magazine’s awards, the judges were “particularly blown away by the depth of the reporting and the degree of access the reporters had to their sources.” More from the piece:

Writer Tracie White earned the sole platinum award in the best-articles category for “Almost without hope,” a look at the heartbreakingly scarce medical resources on an Indian reservation in South Dakota. The judges wrote that they “admired the author’s handling of a subject ripe with standard conventions and hackneyed writing. The author never fell into this trap, capturing the story and delivering it creatively. With a strong fact/narrative balance, the author got this one right. Job well done.”

The magazine earned a gold award for periodical design for its spring 2014 issue, whose theme was mysteries of the heart. The judges said the theme “was carried through the entire magazine in an exceptional way, and we especially loved the variety of interpretations of the theme seen in the illustrations, each of which was compelling, a wonder to look at and a strong partner to the editorial in terms of conveying the subject.” The magazine’s art direction is provided by David Armario Design.

The illustration for “Fresh starts for hearts,” a story in the spring 2014 issue, earned a silver award. The artist who created the image is Jason Holley. “The illustration for this article was beautiful in an artistic way, yet told a story that complemented the article completely,” the judges wrote.

Look for the release of the latest issue of Stanford Medicine in coming days.

Previously: Stem cell medicine for hearts? Yes, please, says one amazing familyKudos for Stanford Medicine magazineBroken promises: The state of health care on Native American reservations and Stanford Medicine magazine writers score two awards
Illustration, from the article “Fresh starts for hearts” in the spring 2014 magazine issue, by Jason Holley

Events, Medical Education, Medical Schools, Science, Stanford News

Stanford Medicine grads urged to break out of comfort zone, use science to improve human health

Stanford Medicine grads urged to break out of comfort zone, use science to improve human health

On Saturday, 195 graduates of the School of Medicine sat under a large white tent on the Alumni Green pondering the next chapter in their medical training. Many of them hadn’t been sure if they would make it to this milestone and, for some, the future seemed uncertain. But the message from Lucy Shapiro, PhD, a recipient of the National Medal of Science, was clear, “Step out of your comfort zone and follow your intuition,” she said. “Don’t be afraid of taking chances. Ask, ‘How can I change what’s wrong?'”

Shapiro told the Class of 2015 how she spent years performing solitary work in the laboratory before she “launched a one-woman attack” to influence health policy and battle the growing threat of infectious disease on the global stage. My colleague Tracie White captures Shapiro’s powerful speech in a story today about the commencement ceremony:

Her attack began with taking any speaking engagement she could get to educate the public about antibiotic resistance; she walked the corridors of power in Washington, D.C., lobbying politicians about the dangers of emerging infectious diseases; and she used discoveries from her lab on the single-celled Caulobacter bacterium to develop new, effective disease-fighting drugs.

Her lab at Stanford made breakthroughs in understanding the genetic circuitry of simple cells, setting the stage for the development of new antibiotics. Shapiro told the audience that over the 25 years that she has worked at the School of Medicine, she has seen a major shift in the connection between those who conduct research in labs and those who care for patients in clinics.

“We have finally learned to talk to each other,” said Shapiro, a professor of developmental biology. “I’ve watched the convergence of basic research and clinical applications without the loss of curiosity-driven research in the lab or patient-focused care in the clinic.”

grads walkingShapiro went on to tell the audience that bridging the gap between the lab and the clinic “can make the world a better place.” Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine, agreed with these sentiments and told graduates that there has never been a better time for connecting advances in basic research with breakthroughs in clinical care. “You are beginning your careers at an unprecedented time of opportunities for biomedical science and for human health,” he said.

The 2015 graduating class included 78 students who earned PhDs, 78 who earned medical degrees, and 39 who earned master’s degrees. Among them was Katharina Sophia Volz, the first-ever graduate of the Interdepartmental Program in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine. “Everybody here is reaching for the stars. We can do the best work here of anywhere,” she said.

Previously: Stanford Medicine’s commencement, in pictures, Abraham Verghese urges Stanford grads to always remember the heritage and rituals of medicineStanford Medicine honors its newest graduatesNational Medal of Science winner Lucy Shapiro: “It’s the most exciting thing in the world to be a scientist” and Stanford’s Lucy Shapiro receives National Medal of Science
Photos by Norbert von der Groeben

Events, Medical Education, Medical Schools, Stanford News

Coming up: A big day for Stanford Medicine’s Class of 2015

Coming up: A big day for Stanford Medicine's      Class of 2015

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Tomorrow, Stanford Medicine’s graduating class will walk away from campus with a new title: Doctor!

The speaker for the medical school commencement will be Lucy Shapiro, PhD, whose unique worldview has revolutionized the understanding of the bacterial cell as an engineering paradigm and earned her the 2014 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize and the National Medal of Science in 2013. The diploma ceremony will be held on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Alumni Green in front of the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge.

All of us at Scope wish the very best for the new graduates.

Previously: Match Day at Stanford sizzles with successful matches & good cheer, Abraham Verghese urges Stanford grads to always remember the heritage and rituals of medicine and Stanford Medicine honors its newest graduates
Photo by Andrew

Mental Health, Research, Science, Technology

Fear factor: Using virtual reality to overcome phobias

Fear factor: Using virtual reality to overcome phobias

3493601806_7f5512fe6d_zPast research has shown that virtual reality can be effective in treating phantom limb syndrome, helping smokers kick their nicotine habit, easing patients’ pain and reducing post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, among other things. Now a pair of engineering students at Santa Clara University in California are exploring the potential of the technology to assist individuals in overcoming their fear of heights and other anxiety-related conditions.

The design duo behind the project are undergrads Paul Thurston and Bryce Mariano. The students partnered with Kieran Sullivan, PhD, a psychology professor at Santa Clara, to develop a simulation tool that guides patients through a controlled virtual environment populated with phobia-triggering features. More details about the system were provided in this recent university story:

They started with a fear of heights simulation. As the patient takes in a 360-degree view from atop a building, the therapist can alter the virtual height and the resultant view—backing off or increasing exposure as needed according to the patient’s emotional response. While the team stresses that their tool is for use by trained therapists, not for sufferers to use on their own, Thurston notes that just knowing you can take the goggles off while immersed in the experience may make this form of treatment more approachable for some.

“Another aspect of our project that has been very important to us is to keep it affordable as well as accessible for future development,” said Mariano. “By using economical hardware and developing the simulation using the Unity Game Engine, which is 100 percent free and readily available, we hoped to create a platform that would allow others to easily pick up the project where we left off and continue expanding on the library of simulations to treat the widest possible range of phobia patients.”

Previously: From “abstract” to “visceral”: Virtual reality systems could help address pain and Can behavioral changes in virtual spaces affect material world habits?
Via CBS San Francisco
Photo by Amber Case 

Health and Fitness, Research, Sleep

Jogging vs. chasing after your kids: Which one will help you sleep better?

Jogging vs. chasing after your kids: Which one will help you sleep better?

playgroundLast weekend, I raced after my toddler around the park for an afternoon and was shocked that my fitness tracker showed I walked the equivalent of 3.5 miles. Exhausted, I decided to count the mother-son outing as fulfilling my daily fitness requirement. But new research shows that when it comes to reaping the full health benefits of exercise, my park play date may not be the optimal form of physical activity.

As most of us know, scientific evidence shows that regular exercise can help us manage weight, improve mental health and mood, boost brain power, strengthen bones and muscles and reduce our risk of cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes and some cancers. Research has also suggests that individuals who clock at least 150 minutes of physical activity a week sleep better and are more alert during the day.

But a University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine study found that forms of exercise such as running, yoga, biking are associated with better sleep habits than housework or child-care activities. To better understand how various forms of physical activity affect sleep, researches analyzed data on nearly 43 adults from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and calculated the relationship between 10 different types of activities and the typical amount of sleep. According to a university release:

Compared to those who reported that they did not get physical activity in the past month, all types of activity except for household/childcare were associated with a lower likelihood of insufficient sleep. To assess whether these effects are just a result of any activity, results were compared to those who reported walking as their main source of activity. Compared to just walking, aerobics/calisthenics, biking, gardening, golf, running, weight-lifting and yoga/Pilates were each associated with fewer cases of insufficient sleep, and household/childcare activity was associated with higher cases of insufficient sleep. These results were adjusted for age, sex, education level, and body mass index.

“Although previous research has shown that lack of exercise is associated with poor sleep, the results of this study were surprising,” said Grandner. “Not only does this study show that those who get exercise simply by walking are more likely to have better sleep habits, but these effects are even stronger for more purposeful activities, such as running and yoga, and even gardening and golf. It was also interesting that people who receive most of their activity from housework and childcare were more likely to experience insufficient sleep – we know that home and work demands are some of the main reasons people lose sleep.”

Researchers will present their findings this week at SLEEP 2015, the 29th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC.

Previously: Can regular exercise improve your quality of sleep?, Superathletes sleep more, says Stanford researcher, The high price of interrupted sleep on your health and Why your sleeping habits may be preventing you from sticking to a fitness routine
Photo by eyeliam

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