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Emergency Medicine, Pregnancy, Research, Surgery, Videos

Self-propelled powder moves against blood flow to staunch bleeding in hard-to-reach areas

Self-propelled powder moves against blood flow to staunch bleeding in hard-to-reach areas

If you nick your skin, it’s easy to stop the bleeding by applying a coagulant powder directly to the cut. Yet, bleeding wounds inside the body are beyond the reach of such blood-stopping powders.

Now, Christian Kastrup, PhD, an assistant professor at the University of British Columbia, and a team of researchers, biochemical engineers and emergency physicians, have developed a way to clot internal wounds by creating a self-propelled powder that moves against the flow of blood.

“Bleeding is the number one killer of young people, and maternal death from postpartum hemorrhage can be as high as one in 50 births in low resource settings so these are extreme problems,” Kastrup explained in a UBC press release. “People have developed hundreds of agents that can clot blood but the issue is that it’s hard to push these therapies against severe blood flow, especially far enough upstream to reach the leaking vessels. Here, for the first time, we’ve come up with an agent that can do that.”

To give blood-clotting powder a push, Kastrup and his colleagues added calcium carbonate to the coagulant powder. The carbonate forms porous micro-particles that latch onto the clotting agent (tranexamic acid). As the particles release carbon dioxide gas, fizzing and moving like mini-antacid tablets, they launch the clotting agent toward the source of bleeding.

More rigorous testing and development needs to be done before this agent is ready for use in humans, as the press release and study explain. But it’s possible that in the near future this powder could be used to treat otherwise unreachable cuts such as those in postpartum hemorrhages, sinus operations and internal combat wounds.

Previously: New obstetric hemorrhage tool kit released todayIn poorest countries, increase in midwives could save lives of mothers and their babiesTeen benefited by Stanford surgeon’s passion for trauma care
Video courtesy of UBC

Medical Education, Medical Schools, Medicine and Literature, Stanford News

Tiger mother, tiger cub: A Stanford doctor reflects on his upbringing

Tiger mother, tiger cub: A Stanford doctor reflects on his upbringing

Tiger Child Pic JAMA PedsWhen Amy Chua’s book, “Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother” was published in 2011, Jason Nagata, MD, was in medical school at the University of California, San Francisco. He caught on to the humor (which escaped some of the book’s reviewers), and the anecdotes resonated with him – reminding him of his own strict and intense upbringing. “It was very funny and very controversial,” he said. “A lot of that book stuck with me from the child’s perspective.” He started to share some of those memories with people around him and found that his fellow med school students had similar stories, too. He wrote about his experiences as a “tiger child” in a funny and touching essay (subscription required) published online today in JAMA Pediatrics.

When I connected with Nagata, we spoke over Skype because he was working in Ecuador as part of his global health residency. He noted that despite the negative press Chua’s book received, he believes that strict childhood training helped prepare him for medical school. “The tiger mentality is prevalent throughout medicine,” he said. “It was intense as a child, but it prepared me well for medical training – the hours and the intensity.”

But Nagata had to learn the hard way to make room in his schedule for rest. After a particularly intense time during medical school, he developed an ulcer that landed him in the hospital. His recovery took more than a month. He explored writing as a way to reflect and think through his experiences as a student and later as a doctor. When he came to Stanford, he attended the Medicine and the Muse writing workshops to hone his writing chops. His current essay is just the latest in a series.

Although he makes time for rest, he still has plenty of drive and intensity. He mentioned that he was planning a trip to the Galápagos Islands and to hike Mount Chimborazo, the highest mountain in Ecuador, the weekend after we spoke. After he completes his residency at Stanford, he’ll start a three year fellowship in adolescent and young adult health in July 2016.

Nagata describes his own mother’s unusual path from NICU nurse to graduate student in chaplaincy. “She exemplified the tiger mom and probably works even harder than I do,” he said. “I got a lot of my habits from her.” She doesn’t demand as much from Nagata these days, but her Tiger mom spark isn’t completely gone. When he told his mother about the upcoming essay, she quipped that she was planning to write a rebuttal to JAMA Pediatrics “in her own tiger mother vein,” he said.

Previously: For group of Stanford doctors, writing helps them “make sense” of their experiences
Photo of Jason Nagata as child, courtesy of Jason Nagata

Events, Medicine and Literature, Medicine and Society, Stanford News

Medical students and physicians share their writings on “becoming a real doctor”

Medical students and physicians share their writings on "becoming a real doctor"

louisewenreading_CROPPEDThe dilemma of being a medical student on clinical rounds who wants to help patients but can’t was captured by third-year student Raymond Deng in his essay “Performing Grief,” at a recent reading held by Stanford’s Medicine and the Muse Program and Pegasus Physician Writers group.

The event, titled “Becoming a Real Doctor: Writings on Medical Education and Training,” also featured a poetry reading by fourth-year medical student Lauren Pischel, a book excerpt by Cornell physician Matt McCarthy, MD, and essay readings by Emily Liu, a second-year medical student, and Louise Wen, MD.

The audience of medical students, physicians, residents, nurses and community members listened attentively as Deng described what it can feel like to be a medical student:

For a year or two, you will inch your way on the tightrope towards white-coated authority from diligently reproduced sham. What you lack in clinical knowledge, you will compensate for with the appropriate attire. Be meticulous. Put on your requisite, freshly-pressed white coat. Hang your stethoscope across the nape of your neck. Cram the pockets of your white coat so full of notes and reference guides that they sag. Ignore the nagging incongruence: the fact that you’re not a doctor but you look like one. You want to help patients, but will settle for watching… You will feel like a cardboard marionette, dancing to the steady rhythm of acting competent and acting ignorant of your acting.

For Wen, it was acting against the rules of eating in the area of clinical care that afforded her the opportunity to connect with her patient, Sara, on a personal level:

Hey doc, here’s a treat for you, I know you guys work hard… Here, try some Afghani bread.” She looks up, eager to connect, and my own yearning to know this women beyond her illness swells within my chest. I can recite numerous details and data points about her medical history and hospital course, but her life as a human being is a gaping void.”

Eating the homemade bread, with “the inside as soft as pillowy sponge cake,” led to a sharing of photographs of Afghanistan and a filling of the void for Wen.

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Aging, Medical Apps, Stanford News, Technology

Stanford Letter Project, which helps users have end-of-life discussions, now available for mobile devices

Stanford Letter Project, which helps users have end-of-life discussions, now available for mobile devices

Stanford_LetterFor many of us, the topic of how we want to spend our final days rarely comes up in discussions with our family members or doctors. And a big reason why is that we think of reflecting on how we want to die as highly emotional and unpleasant.

But there are some compelling reasons to take the time to clarify what matters to you most in your waning days of life: It can reduce stress on your loved ones and help your physician provide a better quality of care.

Earlier this year, VJ Periyakoil, MD, director of palliative care education and training at Stanford, launched the Stanford Letter Project, a campaign to empower all adults to take the initiative to talk to their doctor about what matters most to them at life’s end.

Recently, Periyakoil released mobile app versions of the Stanford Letter Project for both the iPhone and Android. The apps, which offer templates comprised of simple questions aimed at getting the end-of-life conversation rolling, are free and can be downloaded from the iTunes and Google Play stores. Templates are available in Spanish, English, Italian, Taglog, Russian and Hindi.

As Periyakoil explained in a recent 1:2:1 podcast, “2.6 million Americans die every year, and very few of them get to talk to their doctor about their end of life wishes.” She urges every adult to tell their doctors about how they want to spend their last days; she suggests engaging in end-of-life discussions each time you reach a milestone in your life such as getting married, having a baby or being diagnosed with a chronic illness.

Previously: How would you like to die? Tell your doctor in a letter, Stanford doctor on a mission to empower patients to talk about end-of-life issues, Medicare to pay for end-of-life conversations with patients and “Everybody dies – just discuss it and agree on what you want

Research, Science, Stanford News

How Bio-X is fueling the #NextGreatDiscovery

How Bio-X is fueling the #NextGreatDiscovery


The videos, images and stories of #NextGreatDiscovery share two things in common: 1) They reveal the lives and motivations of amazing scientists carrying out basic research, and 2) All the scientists are affiliated with Stanford’s pioneering interdisciplinary institute Bio-X.

Almost 15 years ago, Stanford Bio-X was founded to support biomedical research with an interdisciplinary blend of X, which is to say all the fields across the street from Stanford University School of Medicine – engineering, chemistry, physics, biology, math and statistics as well as the professional schools of business, law and education. Bio-X later came to be housed in the Clark Center, located with crosswalks linking those schools and departments.

Two of the scientists featured in #NextGreatDiscovery recently won Nobel prizes in chemistry, and both discuss the importance of Stanford’s collaborative spirit in their research.

From Michael Levitt, PhD:

The university has the medical school and other departments very close to each other. This means that you can mix together all the sciences whether it is engineering and medicine, mathematics and medicine, statistics and medicine. All of these things are really close together so people are able to interact, groups are able to mix. I think it really is a remarkable environment.

From W.E. Moerner, PhD:

One aspect of research today is that our science has become more and more multidisciplinary. Exciting science occurs at the boundaries between conventional disciplines. Here at Stanford we have a spectacular environment for multidisciplinary work. That’s because in a very close proximity we have all of the humanities and sciences departments, the medical school departments and the engineering departments all close together, essentially across the street from one another right here close to my office.

In the series, scientists discuss the importance of funding for the basic sciences, as federal sources become more scarce. Both Levitt and Moerner have received Seed funding through Bio-X, which support new collaborations between scientists bridging disciplines. These grants are critical for promoting interdisciplinary research through funding at a time when federal resources for early stage collaborations are hard to come by, even for scientists whose research receives a nod from Stockholm.

Previously: #NextGreatDiscovery: Exploring the important work of basic scientists, The value of exploring jellyfish eyes: Scientist-penned book supports “curiosity-driven” research, Basic research underlies effort to thwart “greatest threat to face humanity”For third year in row, a Stanford faculty member wins the Nobel Prize in Chemistry and Stanford’s Michael Levitt wins 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Photo by Peter van Agtmael/Magnum Photos

Chronic Disease, Palliative Care, Parenting, Pediatrics

Missing out on “normal”: Advice from an expert on how to help kids with serious illnesses

Missing out on "normal": Advice from an expert on how to help kids with serious illnesses

Erica Medina and mom Jan 2012 #2When I first met Erica Medina in 2012, she was already practiced at living in two worlds. Then 17, she loved the ordinary teenage realm of high school classes, basketball and volleyball games, and trips to the mall with her friends. But since her diagnosis with juvenile idiopathic arthritis at age 11, she had also spent a lot of time in the medical world, where she and her doctors struggled to manage the pain caused by a disease that has no cure.

The story I wrote about Erica explained how the two worlds sometimes collided:

Back pain made it taxing to sit through school lectures, go on field trips or walk through the mall with friends. It wasn’t just the pain that bothered her: “When I was younger I hated taking my meds,” Erica said, adding that it felt like “giving up” to take pain medicine.

Stephanie [Erica’s mom] was glad Erica’s doctors tackled this issue head-on. “They convinced her that treating pain has nothing to do with weakness,” she said.

Although juvenile idiopathic arthritis is fairly rare, Erica’s longing for normalcy is not. Children and teenagers with all kinds of chronic and serious conditions have the same desire, says pediatric psychologist Barbara Sourkes, PhD, who directs the palliative care program at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.

A big part of Sourkes’ role is to help children, teenagers and their families navigate the divide between living with a difficult diagnosis and simply being a kid. She’s summarized her insights about this in a thoughtful piece on the blog for Digging Deep, a publication designed to help kids facing health challenges. Young people like Erica “commute” between the normal and medical worlds, “an extraordinary challenge,” Sourkes says. From her piece, here is some of her advice for families and others on how to help:

Be aware and sensitive to the importance of feeling “normal” – as normal as possible – for all children and adolescents living with illness. While we typically focus more on adolescents’ desire to “fit in,” even very young children are sensitive to being “different.” Help them focus on and remember what aspects of their lives – and of themselves – are still the same despite the illness.

“Missing out on things” comes in two categories: (1) missing a specific, often special event or activity (e.g. a celebration, a trip) and (2) missing out on life in general (day-to-day daily life, in all its routine).

Adults tend to focus more on the first category, in part because these are events that stand out from the backdrop of daily life. Allow the child to express disappointment / anger / sadness at the prospect of missing the event – do not try to minimize these feelings. After the event, it is very important to let children know that people asked about them and that their presence was missed. It makes the “missing out on things” a little more shared and less one-sided. When realistically possible, promise the child that they will participate in a similar event at a future time.

The second category of “missing out on life in general” is more ongoing and subtle, and probably has more impact on adolescents than on young children. It is also harder to address, since it encompasses all the frustration and sadness of the impact of the illness. Most important is simply to listen to what the children say, without trying to distract them or “problem solve” or cheer them up. These are times that they may just want to be heard and to have their hardship acknowledged.

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Addiction, Behavioral Science, Genetics, Neuroscience, Research, Stanford News

Found: a novel assembly line in brain whose product may prevent alcoholism

Found: a novel assembly line in brain whose product may prevent alcoholism

alcohol silhouette

High-functioning binge drinkers can seem charming and stylish. The ultimate case in point: Nick and Nora of the famed Thirties/Forties “Thin Man” film series (you can skip the ad after the first few seconds).

But alcoholism’s terrific toll is better sighted on city streets than in celluloid skyscraper scenarios. At least half of all homeless people suffer from dependence on one or another addictive drug. (My Stanford Medicine article “The Neuroscience of Need” explores the physiology of addiction.) Alcohol, the most commonly abused of them all (not counting nicotine), has proved to be a particularly hard one to shake.

Alcoholism is an immense national and international health problem,” I wrote the other day in a news release explaining an exciting step toward a possible cure:

More than 200 million people globally, including 18 million Americans, suffer from it. Binge drinking [roughly four drinks in a single session for a man, five for a woman] substantially increases the likelihood of developing alcoholism. As many as one in four American adults report having engaged in binge drinking in the past month.

While there are a few approved drugs that induce great discomfort when a person uses them drinks alcohol, reduce its pleasant effects, or alleviate some of its unpleasant ones, there’s as of yet no “magic bullet” medication that eliminates the powerful cravings driving the addictive behavior to begin with.

But a study, just published in Science, by Stanford neuroscientist Jun Ding, PhD, and his associates, may be holding the ticket to such a medication. In the study, Ding’s team identified a previously unknown biochemical assembly line, in a network of nerve cells strongly tied to addiction, that produces a substance whose effect appears to prevent pleasurable activity from becoming addictive. The substance, known as GABA, acts as a brake on downstream nerve-cell transmission.

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Neuroscience, Pediatrics, Research

Tutoring changes the brain in kids with math learning disabilities

Tutoring changes the brain in kids with math learning disabilities

One-on-one tutoringA new Stanford study, publishing today in Nature Communications, sheds light on how to help children with math learning disabilities. One-on-one cognitive tutoring improves math performance and also normalizes problems in several parts of the brains of these children, the research found.

The findings are important because math learning disabilities often fall off educators’ and parents’ radar. (Everyone has heard of dyslexia, but its numerical equivalent, dyscalculia? Not so much.) Yet math learning disabilities can hamper a child’s ability to gain basic life skills such as managing time and money, and can prevent children from growing up to pursue math- and science-related careers.

The new study is similar to another recent experiment that demonstrated alleviation of math anxiety with tutoring. Both studies are the work of the Stanford MathBrain Project, led by Vinod Menon, PhD.

In the new research, 30 children in third grade received eight weeks of one-on-one tutoring in basic arithmetic skills; half of the kids had math learning disabilities and half did not. The instructors adjusted the sessions’ pace and emphasis individually for each child, helping students past bottlenecks in their learning without making them feel like they might be falling behind their peers. All of the children got MRI brain scans before and after tutoring.

Before tutoring began, the kids with math learning disabilities had abnormal function in a network of brain areas involved in solving numerical problems, including the parietal, prefrontal and ventral temporal-occipital areas. Kids without math learning disabilities did not show these problems. After tutoring, the differences between the two groups’ brain scans disappeared. The children’s math performance also improved, in sync with the brain changes.

These findings suggest that tutoring actually fixes the brain issues at the root of math learning disabilities, rather than providing children with a work-around that circumvents the real problem.

“We demonstrate that, in parallel with performance normalization, 1:1 tutoring elicits extensive functional brain changes in children with math learning disabilities, normalizing their brain activity to the level of neurotypical peers,” the researchers wrote in their paper.

The scientists want to conduct follow-up studies to find out how long the effects of tutoring last. Their new discoveries also lay a framework for studying how to intervene in other forms of learning disabilities.

Previously: Stanford team shows that one-on-one tutoring relieves math anxiety in children, Stanford team uses brain scans to forecast development of kids’ math skills and New research tracks “math anxiety” in the brain
Photo by U.S. Department of Education

Health and Fitness, Public Health, Research

Study shows taking short walks may offset negative health impact of prolonged sitting

Study shows taking short walks may offset negative health impact of prolonged sitting

3046594832_cc702e6266_zWhile most of us know that sitting for prolonged periods of time can be detrimental to our health, sometimes, despite our best intentions, we’re locked into our seats by other circumstances. Perhaps you’re on a long flight with lots of turbulence and, even though our activity tracker is buzzing us to stand up, the fasten seatbelt sign forces you to ignore the alerts. Or maybe you’re at a daylong workshop or training and the opportunities to stretch your legs are few and far between. But recent research suggests that you may be able to counteract such periods of prolonged sitting with a short walk.

In the small study published in Experimental Physiology, researchers at the University of Missouri and University of Texas at Arlington compared the vascular function of a group of healthy men at the beginning of the project, after sitting for six hours and again once they completed a short walk. Results confirmed that when you sit for the majority of an eight-hour work day, blood flow to your legs is significantly reduced. The findings also showed “that just 10 minutes of walking after sitting for an extended time reversed the detrimental consequences,” lead author Jaume Padilla, PhD, said in a release.

In addition to keeping your vascular system in good working order, walking can boost your creative inspiration. A past Stanford study showed a person’s creative output increased by an average of 60 percent when he or she was walking.

Previously: Does TV watching, or prolonged sitting, contribute to child obesity rates?, More evidence that prolonged inactivity may shorten life span, increase risk of chronic disease, Study shows frequent breaks from sitting may improve heart health, weight loss and How sedentary behavior affects your health
Photo by Laura Billings

Cardiovascular Medicine, Research, Stanford News, Stem Cells

Tension helps heart cells develop normally, Stanford study shows

Tension helps heart cells develop normally, Stanford study shows

heart_newsTension might not be fun for us, but it looks like it’s critical for our hearts. So much so that without a little tension heart cells in the lab fail to develop normally.

This is a finding that took a mechanical engineer looking at a biological problem to solve. For many years now scientists have been able to mature stem cells into beating clumps of cells in the lab. But although those cells could beat, they didn’t do it very well. They don’t produce much force, can’t maintain a steady rhythm and would be a failure at pumping actual blood.

Beth Pruitt, PhD, a Stanford mechanical engineer, realized that in our bodies heart cells are under considerable tension, and thought that might be critical to how the cells develop.

She and postdoctoral scholar Alexandre Ribeiro started investigating how heart cells matured in different shapes and under different amounts of tension. They found a combination that produces normal looking cells with strong contractions.
The work could be useful for scientists hoping to replace animal heart cells as the gold standard for identifying heart-related side effects of drugs. Those cells are quite different from our own and often fail to detect side effects that could damage hearts in people taking the drug.

In my story about the work, I quote Ribeiro saying, “We hope this can be a drop-in replacement for animal cells, and potentially instead of having to do individual recordings from each cell we could use video analysis.”

Previously: A new era for stem cells in cardiac medicine? A simple, effective way to generate patient-specific heart muscle cells and “Clinical trial in a dish” may make common medicines safer, say Stanford scientists
Photo by Alexandre Ribeiro

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