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Scope Announcements

Scope is taking a Thanksgiving break

Scope is taking a Thanksgiving break


We’re signing off for the holiday, and we’ll resume our normal publishing schedule on Monday, Nov. 30. Happy Thanksgiving!

Photo by Cat

Events, Medical Education, Stanford News

TEDMED, in pictures

TEDMED, in pictures

A group of MD and PhD students represented Stanford at TEDMED 2015, which was held last week. Several students have written about their experiences on Scope, and here now are some of their photos from the two-and-a-half-day event.

More photos of Stanford Medicine events, people and places can be found on Instagram.

Photos by Eric Trac, Afaaf Shakir, Chao Long, Lichy Han and Thomas Chew

Behavioral Science, Neuroscience, Podcasts

Advice for changing health behavior: “Think like a designer”

Advice for changing health behavior: "Think like a designer"

When listening to our latest 1:2:1 podcast, featuring a conversation with Kyra Bobinet, MD, MPH, two things jumped out at me. First, Bobinet, an expert in design thinking and behavioral change who says she “leads by my curiosity,” has a very cool personal story, and second: We shouldn’t be so hard on ourselves when we struggle to make positive health changes. In short, it’s not us – it’s a design flaw.

The interests of Bobinet, CEO and founder of a design firm using neuroscience to change behavior, can be traced back to medical school, when she was exposed to a program that taught health education in juvenile hall. “I became fascinated by the behavioral patterns of gang members who had violent pasts and came in and out of the system,” she says. These gang members vowed to stay out of jail when they were released but yet “two days later they were immersed” in their old lives and back in trouble. “Why is that happening? And how is that different than me saying I don’t want to eat french fries during Lent but then doing so the second day?” she wonders aloud.

Not long after, an experience with a patient wound up changing the trajectory of her career. During residency she saw a man with gout who had taken meth just three days prior. Bobinet had only ten minutes in clinic with him, and he only mentioned the drug use during the tail end of their conversation, before she had a chance to probe into it. “He changed my life,” she says. “I was so interested in the behavior that led to the medical condition – I [realized I] didn’t want to write prescriptions for the condition anymore, I wanted to focus on the behavior.” She went on to public health school from there.

In the podcast, Bobinet, who also teaches courses on patient engagement and empowerment in the Stanford AIM Lab with Larry Chu, MD, goes on to talk a lot more about behavior and what she has learned through extensive research of patients and caregivers. She talks about her new book, Well Designed Life, which lays the groundwork for those looking to design the changes they want to see in their life, and she offers more advice and words of encouragement for people who are struggling to, say, stay on a diet or quit smoking. “Think like a designer,” she says. Your failed attempt at making positive change “was just a version, just a protoptype… That was something that didn’t work – but it’s not you, it’s the design… And you have to redesign what will grab your attention now.”

Previously: Designing behavior for better health

Humor, Medical Education, Stanford News, Videos

“Dear Future Doctor, here’s a few things you’ll need to know”: Med students release parody video

"Dear Future Doctor, here's a few things you'll need to know": Med students release parody video

Ready for the first-ever musical parody produced by Stanford medical students? Filmed on campus last month and released this afternoon, Dear Future Doctor features a group of mostly first-years singing and dancing to the tune of one of Meghan Trainor’s recent hits. Featuring characters like the Late Doctor, the Greedy Doctor and the Celebrity Doctor, the song also – in the words of producer/writer/editor/first-year student Gun Ho Lee – aims to teach a lesson “on what the future doctor is NOT to do.”

The song “is meant to be a satire of the 21st century American medical system,” director/writer/ second-year student Joshua Wortzel elaborates. “In her song, Meghan Trainor pokes fun at some of the unfortunate aspects of modern courtship and gender norms” – and Dear Future Doctor, in turn, pokes fun at some of the things that “we medical students learn about becoming doctors.”


Bioengineering, Events, Mental Health, Research, Stanford News, Videos

Stanford’s Karl Deisseroth talks about the work he was “destined to do”

Stanford's Karl Deisseroth talks about the work he was "destined to do"

Earlier this week we announced the exciting news that Stanford bioengineer Karl Deisseroth, MD, PhD, had won a $3 million 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences. Before he took the stage to accept his award during a star-studded Academy Awards-like ceremony Sunday evening, the video above was shown to highlight the significance of his work. One of Deissoroth’s quotes:

There are deep questions about the brain that may never be answered, but we’re making headway with optogenetics… We’re headed down a path that gets us to understanding [questions like] why does one person feel the way they do and why does it create a disease when they do a particular way, and what can be done to correct it?

Noting that the suffering of people with psychiatric disease “is a very, very serious and pervasive matter,” he also says “the nature of the illnesses – their complexity, the amount of suffering and the mystery – has made this what I was destined to do.”

Previously: Stanford bioengineer Karl Deisseroth wins 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Life SciencesInside the brain of optogenetics pioneer Karl DeisserothLightning strikes twice: Optogenetics pioneer Karl Deisseroth’s newest technique renders tissues transparent, yet structurally intact and An in-depth look at the career of Stanford’s Karl Deisseroth, “a major name in science”
Video courtesy of National Geographic Channel

Bioengineering, Science, Stanford News

Stanford bioengineer Karl Deisseroth wins 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences

Stanford bioengineer Karl Deisseroth wins 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences

Karl D at Clark - big

Updated 11-9-15: Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of Stanford’s medical school, provided comment last evening on Karl Deisseroth’s win. “The human brain has been called the most complicated object in the universe, but that hasn’t daunted Karl’s quest to understand it,” said Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine. “If anything it seems the challenge has inspired him to develop techniques to see inside this most important of black boxes. This passion to understand the mind, combined with his intelligence and creativity, led to his pioneering role in creating optogenetics.”


11-8-15: We just learned that Stanford Medicine’s Karl Deisseroth, MD, PhD, has received the $3 million 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences, an award designed to “honor transformative advances toward understanding living systems and extending human life.” Deisseroth was given the prize for his work in optogenetics, a technique using light to control the activity of the brain.

The award was presented tonight at a private black-tie, red-carpet ceremony in nearby Mountain View, Calif. “The suffering of the mentally ill and the mysteries of the brain are so deep that, to make progress, we need to take big risks and even blind leaps,” Deisseroth said after accepting his award from actress Kate Hudson. “The members of my lab have taken a leap: borrowing genes from microbes to control the brain.”

Congratulations, Dr. Deisseroth!

Previously: Inside the brain of optogenetics pioneer Karl Deisseroth, Stanford’s Karl Deisseroth awarded prestigious Albany Prize, Breaking through scientific barriers: Stanford hosts 2015 Breakthrough Prize winners, Lightning strikes twice: Optogenetics pioneer Karl Deisseroth’s newest technique renders tissues transparent, yet structurally intact and An in-depth look at the career of Stanford’s Karl Deisseroth, “a major name in science”
Related: Head lights and Optogenetics earns Stanford professor Karl Deisseroth the Keio prize in medicine
Photo by Steve Fisch

In the News, Research, Science, Stanford News, Videos

Brain cell spheres offer new tool to study disease

Brain cell spheres offer new tool to study disease

Earlier this year my colleague reported on some pretty neat work from the labs of psychiatrist Sergiu Pasca, MD, and neurobiologist Ben Barres, MD, PhD. Researchers there figured out how to create spheres of neuronal cells resembling the cerebral cortex, making functional human brain tissue available for the first time to study neuropsychiatric diseases such as autism and schizophrenia. In an article today the Associated Press highlighted this work, with Malcolm Ritter writing:

It’s part of a larger movement over the past few years to create “organoids,” miniature versions of the body’s organs or key parts of organs. Goals include studying disease, testing possible treatments and perhaps supplying replacements for transplants. Scientists have made organoids representing the intestine, prostate, kidney, thyroid, retina and liver.

This overall organoid approach “is a major change in the paradigm in terms of doing research with human tissues rather than animal tissues that are substitutes. … It’s truly spectacular,” says Arnold Kriegstein, who studies the brain at the University of California, San Francisco.

Pasca talks more about the work in the AP video above; Stanford ethicist Hank GreelyJD, also weighs in.

Previously: Brain cell spheres in a lab dish mimic human cortex, Stanford study says

Podcasts, Stanford News

Lloyd Minor shares his vision for Stanford Medicine, talks about its “paradigm‑shifting advances”

Lloyd Minor shares his vision for Stanford Medicine, talks about its "paradigm‑shifting advances"

It’s been almost three years since Lloyd B. Minor took helm of Stanford’s medical school as dean, and he talks about his time here and his plans for the future in a new 1:2:1 podcast. Saying “this is an extraordinarily exciting place to work – a place where it’s easy to get out of bed in the morning with enthusiasm about what lies ahead in the day,” Minor goes on to talk about Stanford Medicine’s vision to lead the biomedical revolution, the promise of precision health, and his commitment to diversity. He also discusses Stanford’s many strengths, including the interdisciplinary nature of the work done here (“our ethos is one that really does encourage collaboration”) and our researchers’ drive to do big things: “For sure, there’s a role for incremental advances, but our unique strength [is in] being able to come up with paradigm‑shifting advances.”

Previously: How Stanford Medicine will “develop, define and lead the field of precision health”At Big Data in Biomedicine, Stanford’s Lloyd Minor focuses on precision healthStanford Medicine’s Lloyd Minor on re-conceiving medical education and A closer look at Stanford Medical School’s new dean

Stanford News

The best of Stanford Medicine on Instagram

The best of Stanford Medicine on Instagram

Here are some of our favorite recent photos on the @Stanford.Med Instagram page. Follow along to see more.

Previously: Stanford Medicine is on Instagram

Addiction, Health Policy, In the News

Stanford addiction expert: “The country needs to spring into action” on heroin epidemic

Stanford addiction expert: "The country needs to spring into action" on heroin epidemic

What’s underlying today’s heroin epidemic and what can be done about it? That was the focus of the opening hour of KQED’s Forum yesterday morning, and Stanford addiction expert Keith Humphreys, PhD, was one of the panelists who weighed in on the issues. He talked about the connection between painkiller addiction and heroin use, the differences between heroin addicts these days versus those in the 1970s, and the use of Naloxone, which can reverse the effects of opioids. Noting that California recently passed a bill that makes this medication available at pharmacies, he said, “I would encourage anyone who is at risk for overdose, or loves someone who is at risk for overdose to get Naloxone.”

Humphreys also referenced the relative lack of resources that goes into studying the heroin epidemic: “We don’t seem to have the will to take this problem on the way we need to… The country really needs to spring into action. We did on AIDS, and we are not doing it here.”

Previously: Heroin: The national epidemic and A focus on addiction, the country’s leading cause of accidental deathIncreasing access to an anti-overdose drug and A reminder that addiction is a chronic disease

Stanford Medicine Resources: