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Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Week of Oct. 19

Grand Roundup: Week of Oct. 19

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

“Stop skipping dessert:” A Stanford neurosurgeon and cancer patient discusses facing terminal illness: Paul Kalanithi, MD, a chief resident in neurological surgery at Stanford, was diagnosed at age 36 with stage IV lung cancer. In this Q&A, he talks about his experiences and about the importance of end-of-life decisions.

Why “looking dumb” in medical school isn’t such a bad thing: In the latest installment of SMS Unplugged, first-year medical student Nathaniel Fleming describes how asking questions is an important part of early medical training.

“Every life is touched by suicide:” Stanford psychiatrist on the importance of prevention: Laura Roberts, MD, chair of Stanford’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, had the opportunity as editor-in-chief of the journal Academic Psychiatry to focus attention on suicide prevention. She talks about the special issue and about suicide prevention in this Q&A.

Unbroken: A chronic fatigue patient’s long road to recovery: A video and Stanford Medicine magazine story talk about research being done at Stanford on chronic fatigue syndrome and tell the story of CFS patient “Erin.”

Screening could slash number of breast cancer cases: Research published this week in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention by Stanford researchers offers intriguing evidence that genetic screening at birth could help prevent breast cancer.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Cancer, Patient Care, Stanford News, Videos

How a new Stanford program is helping transform cancer care

How a new Stanford program is helping transform cancer care

Earlier this week my colleague wrote about a new program where experienced nurses help newly diagnosed cancer patients navigate their medical care. The video above talks more about the program (“We want to take the fear away from our patients and their family,” explains oncologist Oliver Dorigo, MD, PhD) and how it fits into Stanford’s efforts to transform cancer care.

Previously: Pioneering cancer nurses guide patients through maze of care, Ironman of Stanford Women’s Cancer Center and Director of the Stanford Cancer Institute discusses advances in cancer care and research

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Week of Oct. 12

Grand Roundup: Week of Oct. 12

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Walking and aging: A historical perspective: An article in The Atlantic this week offered details on recent research into how moderate to vigorous walking can improve mental acuity in aging populations.

How to keep safe while operating on Ebola patients: Two U.S. surgeons with a combined 30 years of working in developing countries have prepared and disseminated well-defined protocols for operating on any patient with the virus or at-risk of having contracting the virus. Stanford surgeon Sherry Wren, MD, and her collaborator discuss this in a San Jose Mercury News op-ed piece.

Healing hands: My experience being treated for bladder cancer: In this Inspire column, an anonymous cancer patient shares his experiences and expresses gratitude for those “whose healing hands, both literally and figuratively, reached out to help me.”

Summer’s child: Stanford researchers use season of birth to estimate cancer risk: Partnering with Lund University, researchers here are using Sweden’s national registries for birth certificates and medical records to track how factors during gestation and soon after birth – called perinatal factors – affect cancer risks.

Stanford experts offer more information about enterovirus-D68: In this Q&A, Yvonne Maldonado, MD, service chief of pediatric infectious disease at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and Keith Van Haren, MD, a pediatric neurologist, discuss the enterovirus-D68 respiratory illness and neurologic symptoms that might be associated with it.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

Researchers explain how “cooling glove” can improve exercise recovery and performance: The “cooling glove,” a device that helps people cool themselves quickly by using their hand to dissipate heat, was created more than a decade ago by Stanford biologists Dennis Grahn and Craig Heller, PhD. This video demonstrates the device and explains how it can be used to dramatically improve exercise recovery and performance.

 

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Oct. 5

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Gamers: The new face of scientific research?: The developers of EteRNA, an interactive online videogame designed to accelerate biochemists’ understanding of RNA, believe the “open laboratory” nature of online games might be a good scientific model.

Zebrafish: A must-have for biomedical labs: This entry links to a recent Vox article highlighting the usefulness of zebrafish in medical research.

Summer’s child: Stanford researchers use season of birth to estimate cancer risk: Partnering with Lund University, researchers here are using Sweden’s national registries for birth certificates and medical records to track how factors during gestation and soon after birth – called perinatal factors – affect cancer risks.

Ebola: A look at what happened and what can be done: “Ebola is unlikely to become a major problem in the developed world,” Stanford law professor Hank Greely, JD, writes in this blog entry. “But… it seems increasingly likely that hundreds of thousands, and quite possibly millions, of men, women, and children will be struck down by this ghastly plague.”

Stanford experts offer more information about enterovirus-D68: In this Q&A, Yvonne Maldonado, MD, service chief of pediatric infectious disease at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and Keith Van Haren, MD, a pediatric neurologist, discuss the enterovirus-D68 respiratory illness and neurologic symptoms that might be associated with it.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

What are the consequences of sleep deprivation?: Brandon Peters, MD, an adjunct clinical faculty member at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, explains how lack of sleep can negatively affect a person’s well-being in this Huffington Post piece.

Science, Stanford News, Videos

The “simply amazing” work of Nobel Prize winner W.E. Moerner

The "simply amazing" work of Nobel Prize winner W.E. Moerner

Yesterday Stanford chemistry professor W.E. Moerner, PhD, was named a co-winner of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in super-resolution microscopy. In the video above, his colleagues – including Stanford Medicine’s own Lucy Shapiro, PhD, – share their thoughts on his work and the win. “The ability to now look at… mechanisms in a living cell is simply amazing,” Shapiro concluded.

Previously: Breaking the light barrier in medical microscopy: More on today’s Nobel-winning work and For third year in row, a Stanford faculty member wins the Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Science, Stanford News

For third year in row, a Stanford faculty member wins the Nobel Prize in Chemistry

For third year in row, a Stanford faculty member wins the Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Moerner

Stanford chemistry professor W.E. Moerner, PhD, has been named a co-winner of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. An announcement was made earlier this morning by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, which said the award was for “having bypassed a presumed scientific limitation stipulating that an optical microscope can never yield a resolution better than 0.2 micrometers.”

This is the third year in a row that a Stanford faculty member has received the chemistry award: Michael Levitt, PhD, and Brian Kobilka, MD, both from the medical school, won the prize in 2013 and 2012, respectively.

You can get updates on this news by following the hashtag #StanfordNobel.

Congratulations, Professor Moerner!

Previously: Say Cheese: A photo shoot with Stanford Medicine’s seven Nobel laureates, Stanford winners Michael Levitt and Thomas Südhof celebrate Nobel Week, Stanford’s Michael Levitt wins 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Stanford’s Thomas Südhof wins 2013 Nobel Prize in Medicine and Stanford’s Brian Kobilka wins 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Photo L.A. Cicero/Stanford News Service

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Sept. 28

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Stanford experts offer more information about enterovirus-D68: In this Q&A, Yvonne Maldonado, MD, service chief of pediatric infectious disease at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and Keith Van Haren, MD, a pediatric neurologist, discuss the enterovirus-D68 respiratory illness and neurologic symptoms that might be associated with it.

Study: Pregnancy causes surprising changes in how the immune system responds to the flu: New Stanford research shows that immune cells from pregnant women are strongly activated by influenza, which may explain the increased risk of flu complications in pregnancy.

The importance of human connection as part of the patient experience: In a new video, Tim Engberg, vice president of ambulatory care at Stanford Health Care, talks about his experience as a patient at Stanford.

Stanford physicians and engineers showcase innovative health-care solutions: More than 40 inventions and clinical solutions were recently presented at the first annual Spectrum Innovation Research Symposium. The event demonstrated the power of bringing together teams of physicians, bioinformaticists and engineers to apply new technologies and ideas to challenging medical problems.

Examining the potential of big data to transform health care: A KQED segment from earlier this week focused on big data and highlighted a case in which Stanford clinicians used aggregate patient data from electronic medical records to make a difficult and quick decision in the care of a 13-year-old girl with a rare disease.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

CDC, Ebola, Events, Global Health, Stanford News, Videos

Video of Stanford Ebola panel now available

Video of Stanford Ebola panel now available

Last week, a group of Stanford and CDC experts came together to address the health, governance, security and ethical dimensions of Ebola, the virus that is spreading rapidly in West Africa. Video of the lengthy and timely talk, courtesy of the Freeman Spogli Institute, is now available.

Previously: Ebola panel says 1.4 million cases possible, building trust key to containmentInterdisciplinary campus panel to examine Ebola outbreak from all angles, Expert panel discusses challenges of controlling Ebola in West Africa, Should we worry? Stanford’s global health chief weighs in on Ebola and Biosecurity experts discuss Ebola and related public health concerns and policy implications

Grand Roundup

Grand Roundup: Top posts for the week of Sept. 21

The five most-read stories this week on Scope were:

Study: Pregnancy causes surprising changes in how the immune system responds to the flu: New Stanford research shows that immune cells from pregnant women are strongly activated by influenza, which may explain the increased risk of flu complications in pregnancy.

Free online Stanford course examines medical education in the new millennium: At this year’s Stanford Medicine X, executive director Larry Chu, MD, announced the launch of the Medicine X Academy. As part of the academy, a massive open online course (MOOC) course titled “Medical Education in the New Millennium” began this week.

Exercise and your brain: Stanford research highlighted on NIH Director’s blog: In a blog entry, Francis Collins, MD, director of the National Institutes of Health, discussed research by Thomas Rando, MD, PhD, who studies stem cells in muscle and longevity, and Tony Wyss-Coray, PhD, who studies the immune system’s impact on the brain.

Treating an infection to prevent a cancer: H. pylori and stomach cancer: In a Viewpoint piece in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Stanford infectious disease specialist Julie Parsonnet, MD, and her co-authors discuss the link between gastric cancer and chronic infections of Helicobacter pylori.

Discovery may help predict how many days it will take for individual surgery patients to bounce back: Researchers here found that they could predict how well a patient would recover from surgery, based on the activity of a specific set of immune cells. Their work was published in Science Translational Medicine.

And still going strong – the most popular post from the past:

The mystery surrounding lung-transplant survival rates: A 2012 article in the San Francisco Chronicle offered a look at the challenges facing lung transplant patients and explored why a significant number don’t live beyond the five-year mark, despite improvements in survival rates.

Events, Medicine and Society, Stanford News, Videos

How Stanford Medicine celebrated TEDMED

How Stanford Medicine celebrated TEDMED

Earlier this month, TEDMED, an annual global event dedicated to exploring the promise of technology and potential of human achievement in health and medicine, was held simultaneously in San Francisco and Washington D.C. Stanford Medicine served as a medical research institution partner for the event and hosted a reception to cap off Day Two of the three-day conference; the video above captures the evening’s activities and offers a taste of the future of biomedicine.

Previously: Abraham Verghese discusses stealing metaphors and the language of medicine at TEDMED and Stanford Medicine partners with TEDMED on “first-ever gathering on the West Coast”

Stanford Medicine Resources: