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Big data, Cardiovascular Medicine, Chronic Disease, Research, Science, Stanford News, Videos

Big data approach identifies new stent drug that could help prevent heart attacks

Big data approach identifies new stent drug that could help prevent heart attacks

Ziad Ali, MD, PhD, was a cardiovascular fellow at Stanford with a rather unique skill when a 6-year study published today online in The Journal of Clinical Investigation first began.

The multi-talented physician-scientist – who is now associate director of translational medicine at Columbia University Medical Center – had figured out a way to put tiny little stents into mice with clogged arteries as a PhD student.

The skill would become key as he and colleagues set out to find a better pharmaceutical for the drug-eluting stents that are used in combination with angioplasty to treat coronary artery disease. In order to prevent stent disease, the often serious medical problem caused by stents themselves, chemotherapy drugs were added to bare metal stents. But these drug-eluting stents have their own problems: The drugs work like “hitting a pin with a sledgehemmer,” as Ali describes it, often damaging the lining of the arteries which can lead to heart attacks. As a result, patients are required to take blood thinners for up to a year after the procedure to prevent clots.

“A lot of our patient population is on the elderly side with bad hips or diabetes,” Ali told me. “Once you get a drug-coated stent, you can’t have surgery for a year. And if you stop the blood thinners for any reason, you’re at risk of a stent clotting off. And that actually causes a heart attack. Stent thrombosis has a high mortality rate.”

By using a “big data” computational approach, learning about the genetic pathways involved in coronary artery disease, then testing the new theories on mice models in the lab, researchers were able to pinpoint a potential new treatment for patients: Crizotinib, a pharmaceutical approved by the FDA for treatment in certain cases of lung cancer.

“This could have major clinical impact,” Euan Ashley, MD, PhD, senior author of the study, who discusses the work alongside Ali in the video above, said.

Previously: Euan Ashley discusses harnessing big data to drive innovation for a healthier world, New computing center at Stanford supports big data, Trial results promising for new anti-clotting drug and A call to use the “tsunami of biomedical data” to preserve life and enhance health
Photo in featured entry box by Mark Tuschman

Addiction, Behavioral Science, In the News, Mental Health, Research, Stanford News

Veterans helping veterans: The buddy system

Veterans helping veterans: The buddy system

image.img.320.highI interviewed Army specialist Jayson Early by phone over the summer, shortly after he completed an in-patient program for PTSD at the Veterans Affairs hospital in Menlo Park. This was for a Stanford Medicine magazine story I was researching about a pilot project to help get much needed mental-health services to the recently returned waves of Afghanistan and Iraqi vets. What struck me most after talking with Early was just how clueless he had been, first as a teenaged-recruit, then as a young veteran, about the fact that going to war could cause mental wounds.

As the mother of a 17-year-old boy, though, I completely understood: Early just wanted to serve his country. He requested to be sent to war. In 2008, he got his wish and was deployed to Iraq just a year after exchanging his high-school baseball uniform for military fatigues. His first field assignment, an innocuous-sounding public affairs errand to photograph a burned out truck at an Iraqi police station, would be the first of many that left him with permanent scars:

“There were body parts, coagulated blood, hair all over,” [Early] says, pausing. “I just wasn’t expecting it.” An Iraqi family had been executed in the vehicle, presumably by insurgents. Early had gone through intense military training to prepare for moments like these. He blocked any emotions. He followed orders, clicked the camera and moved on. It wasn’t until years later that he realized just how permanently those images, and many more like them, had burned into his brain.

Stanford psychiatrist Shaili Jain, MD, interviewed in a podcast about her work with PTSD and veterans, had told me about a new pilot project that connects veterans with other veterans as a unique way to bridge what she called a “treatment gap” – the difficulty of getting mental-health services to the veterans that need them. My article – which is a timely read, given that today is Veterans Day – tells the story of Early’s connection with one of the veteran’s hired through this project, Erik Ontiveros, who went through treatment for addictions and PTSD himself, and just why it’s so hard to get treatment to veterans. As one well-known expert on PTSD explains in the story:

“It’s wicked difficult to treat anyone with moral injuries from combat in the traditional medical model,” says psychiatrist Jonathan Shay, MD, an expert on PTSD known for his books on the difficulties soldiers face returning home from war. “It destroys the capacity for trust. What it leaves is despair, an expectation of harm, humiliation or exploitation, and that is a horrible state of being. The traditional medical model – in an office with the door closed – is the last thing they want. I’m convinced that’s where peers come in. Peers are indispensable.”

Early told me many of his horror stories from war – stories that he rarely talks about. The time he was called to another execution area where there were enough body parts for 12 people who had all been gagged, bound, shot and burned. But, he said, they could only put together eight people. “We were trying to find a way to identify them,” he said. “Whenever I grabbed a hand, it would just crumble to dust.”

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Bioengineering, Cardiovascular Medicine, Clinical Trials, Research, Science, Stanford News

Using “nanobullets” for good – not evil

Using "nanobullets" for good - not evil

14858598815_b572bddbf9_zMy husband, a big science fiction fan, perked up the other day when I told him I was writing a medical science story about nanotechnology. Apparently, nanotechnology – the study and application of extremely small things – has long been big in the world of science fiction. There, authors have used it to create lots of cool-sounding phantasmagorical stuff like the “nanoprobes” used by the Borg in the movie Star Trek: The Next Generation to assimilate individuals into their collective.

I’m not sure how the fictional nanoprobe was supposedly built, but in my real-life story on the modern day use of nanotechnology to design better methods for heart disease treatment, I do describe the creation of “nanobullets” by Stanford researchers. And it’s pretty cool.

Jayakumar Rajadas, PhD and his colleagues detailed their work in a scientific paper published this month in the journal Biomaterials. Their idea was to create a new and improved delivery system for the delicate peptide apelin into the heart as a treatment for hypertrophic heart disease, which I discuss in the piece:

In a treatment model similar to giving insulin to diabetes patients, physicians have attempted to treat these heart conditions with doses of apelin. The therapeutic agent is delivered intravenously through to the cardiovascular tissue, but due to its short half-life — the drug is quickly eliminated from the blood plasma — the success of this treatment has been limited.

Rajadas considered the possibility for improving the delivery system of the peptide using nanotechnoloy because it has been used for the past 10 years to stabilize therapeutic agents in the body and target them to specific tissues, he said. In this case, the idea was to protect the quickly degrading apelin peptides with large, stable molecules to help transport them to their target organ - the heart:

The research team developed a novel technique to increase the stability of the fragile apelin peptides by protecting them with a lipid cover that Rajadas calls the ‘Trojan Horse’ method of delivery. The liposome ‘nanocarriers’ encapsulates the apelin and sneaks it through the blood to the heart tissue.

The resulting apelin “nanobullets,” as the researchers refer to them, were then delivered through the blood system to the cardiovascular tissue of mice with induced hypertrophic heart conditions. The theory was that the apelin would not be released until it was near the heart tissue.

Researchers then tried it out, shooting the nanobullets into the hearts of mice with hypertrophic heart disease. They delivered two shots over a 14-day period. Results showed that symptoms dramatically improved in the mice that received the shots with the apelin nanobullets when compared to mice shot with saline treatments or even treatments of apelin not protected with the liposome covering.

“Apelin in this form could eventually be used as treatment for humans delivered as a shot rather than intravenously as in the past,” Rajadas told me. “The idea is that regular monthly or bimonthly shots could lesson symptoms.”

Previously: Stanford team develops nanotech-based microchip to diagnose Type 1 diabetes
Photo by NMK Photography

Cancer, Events, In the News, Patient Care, Stanford News

A neurosurgeon’s journey from doctor to cancer patient

A neurosurgeon's journey from doctor to cancer patient

image.img.320.highEarlier this week, I had the chance to hear Stanford neurosurgeon Paul Kalanithi, MD, discuss living with advanced-stage lung cancer in a conversation with palliative care specialist Timothy Quill, MD. The idea for the night’s event, which was held on the Stanford medical school campus, was to provide a good example of how the doctor-patient relationship can help improve quality of life for the very sick. On stage before a packed audience, Kalanithi, prodded by Quill’s gentle but pointed questions, told the story of how serious illness changed his life. As I wrote in an online story posted yesterday:

“Are there things in particular that you worry about now?,” asked Quill… a professor of psychiatry and medical humanities at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and an expert in end-of-life decision making. “Not really,” [Kalanithi] said. “I am sad at not seeing my daughter grow up, at probably not being here long enough for her to have a memory of me. I try to worry about things that are actually changeable. I worry about getting my book finished. I’d like to have that done for my daughter to know me.”

What surprised Kalanithi most about his life after being diagnosed with lung cancer was just how hard it was dealing with those “existential” questions, he told Quill:

“Having to deal with questions like, ‘What am I going to do with my life?’ was exceedingly difficult. After realizing I wasn’t going to die in weeks or months, figuring out what I was going to do with that time was a struggle.”

Kalanithi has reorganized his priorities since his diagnosis in May 2013, setting new priorities for a much shorter lifespan than he once expected – planning for years instead of decades. He and his wife got their finances in order, they had their first child July 4. Kalanithi said he has found solace in his love of poetry, and through his writing. Kick-starting a writing career that he had planned to start in 20 years was one of those changes.

In January, he wrote an op-ed piece for the New York Times about his cross over from physician to patient titled: “How long have I got left?” He told the audience how surprised he was at the overwhelmingly positive response he received to the story. “My own thoughts on something very personal, really resonated with people. I still get an email every other day in response to the New York Times piece. It’s a great inspiration to me to remember why writing is important.” [Editor's note: Kalanithi's recent Q&A here on Scope has also drawn massive attention; it's already one of our most popular posts of the year.]

Kalanithi’s final message, particularly to those young physicians and medical students in the audience, was to listen to your patients. Take time to get to know them. Remember why it is that you went to medical school. When asked if he treats his own patients differently since his diagnosis, he was characteristically thoughtful. “I think I felt a depth that I didn’t before… But I had excellent role models. I was trained you don’t just go over what are the risks and benefits. You really try to convey as much as you can about what it’s going to feel like.” He told his favorite example of a pediatric oncologist who he observed talking to parents whose daughter had just been diagnosed with a brain tumor. The doctor’s advice: “You need to support each other. You have to prepare your patients as much as you can for that larger emotional experiential landscape. You have to get enough sleep.”

Previously: “Stop skipping dessert:” A Stanford neurosurgeon and cancer patient discusses facing terminal illness and No one wants to talk about dying but we all need to.
Photo by Norbert von der Groeben

Cardiovascular Medicine, Chronic Disease, In the News, Research, Science, Stanford News

How best to treat dialysis patients with heart disease

How best to treat dialysis patients with heart disease

523392_4923732760_zKidney failure patients on dialysis often have other chronic diseases – heart disease topping the list. They’re prescribed an average of 12 pills a day by physicians, according to Stanford nephrologist Tara Chang, MD, and they spend three-to-four hours at a treatment center three times a week connected to an artificial kidney machine.

For Chang, this makes it all the more important that any medication she prescribes for a patient on dialysis is both essential and effective.

The problem is, particularly in the case of treating kidney patients with heart disease, evidence-based treatment guidelines just aren’t available. Kidney doctors are left making best guesses based on guidelines written for the general population.

“Our patients might be different from patients not on dialysis,” said Chang. “Dialysis patients have a lot of heart disease, yet rarely does a cardiology study enroll patients on dialysis, so we just don’t know.”

This was part of the motivation behind Chang’s most recent study examining the use of anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel, one of the most commonly prescribed drugs for kidney patients. The researchers looked at the use of anti-platelet medications such as clopidogrel as treatment following stenting procedures to unclog arteries in the heart in 8,458 dialysis patients between 2007 and 2010. The data suggests that longer-duration of drug use may be of benefit to patients on dialysis who get drug-eluding stents but not those who get bare metal stents. Chang told me:

We found that for those who got drug-eluting stents who took the drug for 12 months compared to those who had stopped the drug at some earlier time point, there was a non-statistically significant trend towards lower risks of death and heart attacks. So for this group, following the same guidelines as for the general population may be appropriate. However, we found no indication of benefit with longer duration of anti-platelet drug use for patients on dialysis who got bare metal stents.

About half of the 400,000 patients in the U.S. on dialysis also have coronary artery disease, as referenced in the study. The number of those getting stents inserted to unclog arteries also has increased 50 percent in the past decade, the study states. The results of the study, while not definitive as to exactly how long doctors should prescribe the drug, does stress the need for more clinical research on patients with kidney failure to provide guidance on treatment strategies for heart disease.

“Because our study was not a randomized trial,” said Chang, “we tried to be very measured in how we interpreted the results. What it does point to is the fact that we can’t assume that what works in non-dialysis patients works in dialysis patients. Hopefully our study will help convince researchers to include our dialysis patients in their studies.”

The paper was published this week in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Previously: Keeping kidney failure patients out of the hospitalStudy shows higher rates of untreated kidney disease among older adults and Study shows daily dialysis may boost patients’ heart function, physical health.
Photo by newslighter

Ebola, Global Health, Infectious Disease, Patient Care, Stanford News, Surgery

How to keep safe while operating on Ebola patients

How to keep safe while operating on Ebola patients

surgical instrumentsAmid the Ebola crisis, two U.S. surgeons with a combined 30 years of working in developing countries have stepped forward to help disseminate well-defined protocols for operating on any patient with the virus or at-risk of having contracting the virus.

In an op-ed piece published today in the San Jose Mercury News, the two surgeons first ask, then answer, their own question: “Why should anyone care about surgery and Ebola? Ebola is a virus.” Their answer is that patients still have accidents. They still need things like appendectomies and C-sections and treatment for gunshot wounds.

The piece points to shocking news reports like those of 16-year-old Shacki Kamara, a patient in Sierra Leone who died of gunshot wounds to his leg during the Ebola quarantine of West Point, Liberia because people were afraid to operate on him. The growing fear of operating on anyone suspected of having contracted the Ebola virus, which is transmitted by bodily fluids, is a flashback to the early days of the AIDS crisis when operating room personnel and physicians often declined to treat patients, said Stanford surgeon Sherry Wren, MD, who co-authored the op-ed with Johns Hopkins surgeon Adam L. Kushner, MD, founder and director of Surgeons OverSeas. The two wrote:

With supportive medical care, patients may survive an Ebola infection. Without surgery for severe trauma, obstructed labor, a strangulated hernia, or a perforated ulcer, some patients may die. The moral dilemma is overwhelming. How does one operate on a patient infected with Ebola, yet at the same time protect the surgical staff?

Last week, the two came together to write an Ebola surgery protocol and send it to a number of surgical organizations, and the largest one – the American College of Surgeons – immediately accepted and posted it on their website. The response to the new guidelines was immediate and overwhelming, Wren said. In Africa, 10 countries have since adopted the protocol. Press articles on the guidelines have also appeared around the world, including in the New York Times and Washington Post and on Al Jazeera. Wren told me in a phone interview that she was both a bit surprised and overwhelmed by the reaction:

I’ll tell you, it was amazing. I’ve seen very few things in surgery go that fast. There was a need to start the discussion. It was never my intent to be the definitive Ebola expert. I’ve never seen a case of Ebola in my life. We expanded existing  CDC guidelines for prevention of transmission of other infections such as HIV and hepatitis and then added common sense from years of  experience operating.

Both Wren and Kushner acknowledged the “unsung heroes” who bravely choose to treat Ebola patients and stress the importance of working to keep them as safe as possible by increasing the availability of supplies of protective gear especially in West Africa and working toward increased training for health care workers. As they state in their op-ed:

 The management of Ebola is new to many clinicians in the United States and elsewhere. We hope to see more training, protocols and personal protective supplies to lower risks to surgical staff and patients. Just as surgery is a necessary part of a functioning health system, surgery must be part of the discussion during this time of Ebola; otherwise, the death toll will not only include those unfortunate to have died from the virus but also those unlucky to have developed a treatable surgical condition in this time of Ebola.

Previously: Experience from the trenches in the first Ebola outbreak, Ebola: A look at what happened and what can be done, Paul Farmer: We should be saving Ebola patients, Ebola panel says 1.3 million cases possible, building trust key to containment and Should we worry? Stanford’s global health chief weighs in on Ebola
Photo by Badly Drawn Dad

Medical Education, Medicine and Society, Neuroscience, Science, Stanford News

Studying science at Stanford is a dream come true for one California man

Studying science at Stanford is a dream come true for one California man

new grad students

Tawaun Lucas grew up in Compton, East LA, a city with a reputation – whether deserved or not – for producing gangsters, not neuroscientists. It’s a reputation Lucas just ignored.

A high-school athlete who dreamed of playing  in the NFL or going to the Olympics, the 22-year-old instead joined this year’s entering class of neuroscience graduate students at Stanford with a new set of aspirations.

Dreams change, Lucas explained me when I interviewed him for a story I wrote about the 135 new bioscience graduate students starting the fall semester at Stanford. As I describe in the story:

Lucas only changed his aspirations from sports to science after being sidelined by injuries his sophomore year at California State University-Northridge, where he was on a scholarship as a track athlete. But starting Stanford’s neurosciences PhD program is a dream come true, he said. “Stanford was always my first choice,” he said. “I applied to 12 schools.” When he got the acceptance call from Stanford, he said he nearly dropped the phone. “I almost teared up and cried,” he said. “It was surreal. I can’t even describe the experience.”

Lucas’s mother worked as a bus driver for the Long Beach school district. His dad was a maintenance worker. No one in his family went to college, and he wasn’t a particularly good student in high school, so the path to studying neuroscience at Stanford was an unexpected one. But programs for underrepresented minorities in the sciences helped him along the way, as did his own fascination with human behavior and the study of the brain:

His interest in science didn’t develop until his undergraduate years. He was living at home at the time with his parents, working as a bank teller while attending Cal State Northridge.  He began to turn his energies to academics when athletics was no longer an option. “Once I figured out what I wanted to do, I became focused,” he said. He chose to study psychology because the environment he grew up in had sparked his curiosity about human behavior. “I grew up in an urban area around some pretty crazy people who made some pretty weird decisions,” he said. “I began to wonder why do people, say, raised in Compton or Watts, for example, make different choices than someone raised in, say, Manhattan Beach? Is it socioeconomic? Psychological? Is there a genetic element?

Anthony Ricci, PhD, a professor of otolaryngology and member of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute, who played a role in encouraging Lucas to apply to Stanford and is part of an institution-wide effort to encourage diversity in the sciences, emphasized just how important diversity is to future advances in science:

“A person’s background is really important to how they think about a problem,” Ricci said. “If everyone were white, middle-class, Harvard-trained, they might think too much alike. Science needs people who think differently.”

Previously: First-year science graduate students enter brave new world and No imposters here: Stanford grad students reassured as they begin school
Photo by Norbert von der Groeben

Medical Education, Medical Schools, Mental Health, Stanford News, Surgery

New surgeons take time out for mental health

New surgeons take time out for mental health

rope webI spent a recent morning watching about 30 Stanford surgical residents take time off from their operating rooms to participate in a series of team-building games out on the alumni lawn on campus. These are busy, dedicated professionals who are passionate about their work, so getting them to take time off is hard. “I can tell you a surgical resident would rather be in the operating room than anywhere else on earth,” Ralph Greco, MD, a professor of surgery, told me as he sat on a nearby bench watching the residents play games.

In a story I wrote about the games, I describe how the Balance in Life program, which sponsored the day’s event, was founded following the suicide of a former surgical resident, Greg Feldman, MD. Greco, who helped build the program, was committed to doing whatever he could to prevent any future tragedies like Feldman’s, as I explain in the piece:

“The residency program was just rocked to its knees,” he said, remembering back to the death in 2010 of the much-loved mentor and role model for  many of the surgical residents and medical students at the time. Feldman died after completing his surgical residency at Stanford and just four months into his vascular surgery fellowship at another medical center. “It was a very frightening time,” Greco said. “Residents were questioning whether they’d made the right choices.”

Today, the Balance in Life program includes, among other thing, a mentorship program between junior and senior residents, group therapy time with a psychologist and a well-stocked refrigerator with free healthy snacks. Residents themselves, like Arghavan Salles, MD, who participated in the ropes course, plan and coordinate activities:

“Some people think this is kind of hokie,” said Salles, who was one of a group of residents who helped found the program along with Greco following Feldman’s death. “Surgery is a super critical field,” Salles said. She paused to instruct a blind-folded colleague: “Step left! Step left!” “You face constant judgment in everything you do and say,” she added. “Everyone is working at the fringes of their abilities. They’re stressed.”

While writing this story, my co-workers suggested I read a September editorial in the New York Times that brought the issue into sharp focus. Spurred by the suicides two weeks prior of two second-year medical residents who jumped to their deaths in separate incidents in New York City, Pranay Sinha, MD, a medical resident at Yale-New Haven Hospital wrote about the unique stresses of new physicians:

As medical students, while we felt compelled to work hard and excel, our shortfalls were met with reassurances: ‘It will all come in time.’ But as soon as that MD is appended to our names in May, our self-expectations skyrocket, as if the conferral of the degree were an enchantment of infallibility. The internal pressure to excel is tremendous. After all, we are real doctors now.

Pranay’s message was similar to the one promoted by Stanford residents during the games: The key to battling new physician stress is realizing that you are not alone, that your colleagues are there to support you. “It sounds touchy feely to say that we care,” Salles told me. “But at the end of the day, if we want to have better patient care, we need to take care of each other too.”

Previously: Using mindfulness interventions to help reduce physician burnout and A closer look at depression and distress among medical students
Photo by Norbert von der Groeben

Aging, Health Policy, In the News, Medicine and Society

No one wants to talk about dying, but we all need to

No one wants to talk about dying, but we all need to

“Dying in America is harder than it has to be.”

That’s the headline of one of the stories published following the release of the Institute of Medicine’s 500-page report titled “Dying in America.” The report tackles head-on the difficult topic of how to provide individualized, appropriate care for patients with advanced serious illness in a country that is grappling with out-of-control health care costs.

Patients should, and can, take control of the quality of their life through their entire life, choosing how they live and how they die

Its conclusion: The system needs a major overhaul.

“Our current system is broken,” said David M. Walker, co-chair of the 21-member committee that authored the report and former U.S. Comptroller General from Bridgeport, Conn. “It does not result in the type of quality of care that people deserve and desire and it’s much more costly. Systematic changes are needed for more compassionate, affordable care.”

No easy solutions exist, the authors said at an hour-long press conference announcing the release of the report yesterday. Instead, they plan to spend the next year getting their message out to the public with far ranging goals for change: from more comprehensive coverage of palliative care by medical insurance, to more hours of palliative care education in medical and nursing schools, to improved communication between health care providers and their patients about their end-of-life care choices – along with a payer-system that reimburses for those conversations.

It’s a controversial topic that broke out into the public debate five years ago during the passage of the Affordable Care Act, when opponents of the bill claimed that a proposal for Medicare to reimburse doctors for counseling patients about living wills and advance directives would lead to bureaucrats setting up “death panels” to determine who deserved care.

But it’s also a topic that can no longer be ignored, authors of the report said. Too many Americans are suffering unnecessarily and as the elderly population continues to grow with the aging of the baby boom generation, these problems will continue to multiply.

“For most people, death does not come suddenly,” said Philip Pizzo, MD, co-author of the report and former dean of Stanford’s medical school, in an email to me discussing the conclusions of the report. “Instead, dying is a result of one or more diseases that must be managed carefully and compassionately over weeks, months, or even years, through many ups and downs.”

Physicians and other health care professionals can provide well-rounded care at the end of life to relieve patient pain, maximize functioning, alleviating emotional stress, and ease the burden of loved ones – all in a manner that is consistent with individual choices, he said.

“Patients should, and can, take control of the quality of their life through their entire life, choosing how they live and how they die,” Pizzo said.

But it’s not happening today.

“Studies show that doctors want to die in comfort at home at the end of life, but subject patients to high-intensity ineffective treatments,” he said. “Why?”

Previously: Study: Doctors would choose less aggressive end-of-life care for themselves, Former School of Medicine dean named to expert panel to reform end-of-life care in America, Communicating with terminally ill patients: A physician’s perspective and On a mission to transform end-of-life care

Medical Education, Medical Schools, Stanford News

Medical students start “transformational” journey

Medical students start "transformational" journey

With the help of Lars Osterberg MD, MPH, and Dr. Neil Gesundheit, MD. they give Brandon Turner  his official white coat at at the Stanford Medicine White Coat and Stethoscope Ceremony on Friday, August 22, 2014,at Stanford School of Medicine.  ( Norbert von der Groeben / Stanford School of Medicine )

The new school year has begun for students across the country, including Stanford’s 90 first-year medical students – who started class on Monday and spent last week at orientation activities anxious and excited for the  journey to finally begin.

To help the students prepare, faculty talked to them about the emotional and academic challenges of medical school and emphasized that it can be metamorphic and, not surprisingly, somewhat stressful. “They are seeing life and death,” said one faculty member at orientation, who added that medical school “is a transformational time the likes of which I don’t think you see in any other level of education.”

The week of preparation concluded with the traditional stethoscope ceremony, which I wrote about in an article published online today. The ceremony symbolizes the importance of the personal connection between doctor and patient, and during the event each student walks across the stage to accept their stethoscopes. As Laurie Weisberg, MD, president of the medical center alumni association, told the students:

The great thing about the stethoscope is you have to be close to your patient to use it. This is your chance to truly interact with the patient. You are listening to what the patient has to tell you.

In his address to the students, Dean Lloyd Minor, MD, told them the four-year, or longer, journey would change the way they see the world and that they “will learn some of life’s most valuable lessons from your patients.” He also highlighted some of the demographics of the new class:

Fifty-one percent of you are women; 15 percent of you are from communities underrepresented in medicine; 21 of you were born outside of the U.S., coming from China, Columbia, India, Vietnam, just to name a few. You come from a diverse and wide range of universities — 10 of you from Stanford, 13 from the Stanford of the East [Harvard]. Eighteen of you already have a master’s or a doctorate, and many of you have already published research, participated in varsity athletics, shined in the arts and contributed to your community.

Previously: Abraham Verghese urges Stanford grads to always remember the heritage and rituals of medicine, Top 10 reasons I’m glad to be in medical school and “Something old and something new” for Stanford medical students
Photo, of Brandon Turner receiving his official white coat at a ceremony last Friday, by Norbert von der Groeben

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