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The scenario many of us learned in school is that two X chromosomes make someone female, and an X and a Y chromosome make someone male. These are simplistic ways of thinking about what is scientifically very complex.

The scenario many of us learned in school is that two X chromosomes make someone female, and an X and a Y chromosome make someone male. These are simplistic ways of thinking about what is scientifically very complex.

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Stanford research shows that having high blood pressure at peak exercise intensity could indicate good fitness, rather than revealing heart disease risk.

Stanford research shows that having high blood pressure at peak exercise intensity could indicate good fitness, rather than revealing heart disease risk.

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Are the health-benefit claims from intermittent fasting backed up by scientific evidence? John Trepanowski, postdoctoral research fellow at the Stanford Prevention Research Center,weighs in.

Are the health-benefit claims from intermittent fasting backed up by scientific evidence? John Trepanowski, postdoctoral research fellow at the Stanford Prevention Research Center,weighs in.

A physician, a linguist and a sociologist explored how technology has affected human interactions in a panel discussion hosted by Stanford’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.

A physician, a linguist and a sociologist explored how technology has affected human interactions in a panel discussion hosted by Stanford’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.

In the fourth post in the Taking Depression Seriously series, Sophia Xiao and physician Randall Stafford clarify different types of medications.

In the fourth post in the Taking Depression Seriously series, Sophia Xiao and physician Randall Stafford clarify different types of medications.

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Sidelined by injury, runner Ellen Bouchard turned to science and discovered that proper form, not the perfect shoes, are the key to avoiding pain.

Sidelined by injury, runner Ellen Bouchard turned to science and discovered that proper form, not the perfect shoes, are the key to avoiding pain.

In this Stanford Medicine Unplugged piece, second-year student Orly Farber shares her experiences getting into medical school.

In this Stanford Medicine Unplugged piece, second-year student Orly Farber shares her experiences getting into medical school.

The percentage of pregnant women getting epidurals or other spinal analgesia has climbed to a high of 71 percent, according to a Stanford study.

The percentage of pregnant women getting epidurals or other spinal analgesia has climbed to a high of 71 percent, according to a Stanford study.

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PSA testing is an important tool to spot prostate cancer, but it remains a bit confusing. Stanford urologist James Brooks clarifies some misconceptions.

PSA testing is an important tool to spot prostate cancer, but it remains a bit confusing. Stanford urologist James Brooks clarifies some misconceptions.

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Lasers, heat maps, fluorescence and real-time imaging help guide surgeons who are developing new ways to enhance precision brain surgery.

Lasers, heat maps, fluorescence and real-time imaging help guide surgeons who are developing new ways to enhance precision brain surgery.

In the sixth post in A Skeptical Look At Popular Diets, Stanford physician Randall Stafford analyzes the pros and cons of a raw food diet.

In the sixth post in A Skeptical Look At Popular Diets, Stanford physician Randall Stafford analyzes the pros and cons of a raw food diet.