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Obesity, Pediatrics, Public Health, SMS Unplugged

When the wheels on the bus (don’t) go round: Driving the spread of local health programs

When the wheels on the bus (don't) go round: Driving the spread of local health programs

SMS (“Stanford Medical School”) Unplugged is a forum for students to chronicle their experiences in medical school. The student-penned entries appear on Scope once a week; the entire blog series can be found in the SMS Unplugged category.

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A few years ago, I was doing a summer internship in which I looked at health outcomes for hospitalized patients. I sat in an office and read about patients with issues like high blood pressure and cholesterol. At a certain point, I realized that the reports on their outcomes were interesting, but the real solution to the problems I was studying was happening outside my window. My window overlooked a park, where kids would run around all day until they were exhausted. And it got me thinking that if all kids were as active as those ones, there would a lot fewer reports for me to read.

So last year, I worked with several medical and law students to design a county-level childhood obesity prevention policy. The need for such programs is self-explanatory: More than one third of children in the U.S. are overweight or obese. By the time people reach adulthood, that proportion goes up to two thirds. By creating a team of both medical and law students, we hoped to come up with approaches that achieved the goal of improving health, and did so in a practical and implementable way.

Over the course of several months, we analyzed dozens of programs that have been used to bring down childhood obesity rates in various communities across the country. The programs ranged from well-known approaches (e.g. a soda tax or menu calorie counts) to some more obscure ones. My personal favorite was the “Walking School Bus” (WSB). Think about how your parents used to tell you that things were tougher in their day when they had to walk to school (in the snow, going uphill, barefoot, etc.). The goal of a WSB is to bring that world back. The catch is that parents/adults walk along a predetermined “bus” route, pick up kids along the way, and then walk them to school. Kids get a supervised walk that allows them to get some exercise every day.

Case studies, and one meta-analysis, suggest that WSBs are an effective way to increase the amount of exercise kids get. But odds are, you’ve never heard about them before. Neither have most school officials, local politicians, and others in a position to take action on childhood obesity. That’s because WSBs are not widely used. This realization led me to an interesting question: Which factors make a local program or intervention spread to other communities? What does it take to turn a single success story into a widespread strategy?

These are hardly new questions. Every business or non-profit that plans to scale up considers it. Atul Gawande, MD, attempted to figure out why certain medical interventions spread in a New Yorker article last year. Whether you’re talking about social programs, technology, or just an idea, the question remains. I don’t pretend to have the answer, but my work reviewing obesity prevention policies did lead me to a few conclusions about the spread of local programs.

First, success is necessary but not sufficient for a program’s spread. Just because it proves to be successful does not mean anyone else will adopt it. WSBs were one example. Granted, WSBs are not adaptable to every community – they require schools to be within walking distance and rely on good weather. But the same story is true for other approaches. For instance, joint-use agreements are a strategy where schools open up their facilities (e.g. outdoor fields, basketball courts, etc.) after school hours to give children and families access to recreational space. Despite a correlation between these agreements and better health outcomes, they remain in limited use in many of the communities where recreational space is most lacking.

So if success doesn’t lead to a program’s spread, what does? I believe one factor is the involvement and enthusiasm of multiple stakeholders, potentially including local government, businesses, school administrators, and involved community members. A second factor is the development of measurable and achievable goals. It is nearly impossible to see incremental changes in health outcomes, so programs designed to change health must establish metrics that can demonstrate progress.

The list of lessons from our survey of local programs goes on, but the biggest takeaway is clear. Problems in health care require not only a solution, but successful execution.

Akhilesh Pathipati is a second-year medical student at Stanford. He is interested in issues in health-care delivery.

Image by EME

Immunology, In the News, Parenting, Pediatrics

Ivy and Bean help encourage kids to get vaccinated

Ivy and Bean help encourage kids to get vaccinated

Ivy and Bean2Last week, I took my two little boys to get their shots, including the MMR vaccine that protects against measles, mumps and rubella. Although, as a mom, it’s easy for me to understand the value of vaccines, I’m not sure my preschooler was completely convinced that getting poked in the arm was a great idea.

That’s why I am thrilled to see “Ivy and Bean vs. The Measles,” a set of posters and other educational materials that Sophie Blackall, the illustrator of the popular series of children’s books, has produced in collaboration with the Measles and Rubella Initiative. Blackall’s illustrations show Bean, one of the book’s two heroines, devising a series of unconventional strategies for avoiding the measles: wear a biohazard suit for the rest of your life, get adopted by a polar bear, or (my personal favorite) cover yourself in a 6-inch protective layer of lard.

“Or,” says Ivy, “get vaccinated!”

My son would probably be most interested in Bean’s suggestion to “Move to the moon!” He loves all things outer space-related, and I love the idea of finding something at our doctor’s office that would spark his interest and help me explain to him why he needs that brief poke in the arm.

Bravo, Ivy and Bean!

Via Shots
Previously: Side effects of childhood vaccines are extremely rare, new study finds, Measles is disappearing from the Western hemisphere and Tips for parents on back-to-school vaccinations
Artwork by Sophie Blackall

Cancer, Infectious Disease, Pediatrics, Research, Stanford News

Summer’s child: Stanford researchers use season of birth to estimate cancer risk

Summer’s child: Stanford researchers use season of birth to estimate cancer risk

Four_seasons

One of the hardest parts of unraveling childhood cancers is understanding what causes them. In recent years, evidence has been mounting that cancer and many other chronic diseases begin early in life – and perhaps even in utero. To untangle some of these early causes of cancer in children and young adults, Stanford epidemiologist and family physician Casey Crump, MD, PhD, is partnering with researchers at Lund University in Sweden, a working relationship was set up by Marilyn Winkleby, PhD, MPH, professor emeritus of medicine here. The team is using Sweden’s national registries for birth certificates and medical records to track how factors during gestation and soon after birth – called perinatal factors – affect cancer risks.

Because Sweden has a national health care system, it’s relatively easy to track the course of illness in individuals. By comparison, the U.S.’s health care system is fragmented across dozens of health care providers and insurers, so getting medical records for a single person that might span decades is a much more difficult prospect.

Crump’s team is focusing on cancers that are common in childhood and early adulthood: brain tumors, leukemia and lymphoma among them. Two papers published earlier this year examine how the time of year a child is born affects cancer risk. The most recent, published ahead of print in April in the International Journal of Cancer, examined whether the season of birth was linked to the risk of developing either Hodgkin’s lymphoma or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma later in life. Crump explained:

Lymphomas are among the most common cancers in childhood but the causes are still largely unknown. It’s been hypothesized that infectious exposures, such as Epstein Barr virus and others may play an important role, but it’s still unclear what the critical age window of susceptibility might be. We had an opportunity to use season of birth from birth records as a proxy for infectious exposures in the first few months of life, and see the relationship between that and subsequent risk of Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma – following these people from birth through childhood and on into young adulthood.

The researchers found that children born in spring or summer had a higher risk of developing non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma later in life compared to kids born in winter. The team didn’t find any similar seasonal pattern for risk of Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The results lend additional support to the “delayed exposure hypothesis.” Children born in spring or summer may not be exposed to critical pathogens during a critical early period of immune system development, leaving them vulnerable later in life. Children born in the fall or winter, by comparison, do get that important exposure at just the right time. Crump was quick to note that season of birth provides only a rough estimate of these exposures, since the team didn’t have accurate measures of exposures to Epstein Barr or other viruses, but he also added that these results “shed additional light on possible pathways of risk that may contribute to the development of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.”

A similar study published in January in the International Journal of Epidemiology found that children born in spring and summer had a higher chance of developing melanoma later in childhood or early adulthood. The team hypothesized that spring and summer babies are exposed to more UV radiation in warm summer months in the first few months of life – an exposure that fall and winter babies are less likely to have.

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Behavioral Science, Parenting, Pediatrics, Research, Stanford News

Families can help their teens recover from anorexia, new study shows

Families can help their teens recover from anorexia, new study shows

anorexia-appleUpdated 10-2-14: In a just-published 1:2:1 podcast, Lock discusses this work in depth.

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9-24-14: A large new study comparing two treatments for anorexia nervosa offers a hopeful message to parents of teens affected by the eating disorder: Families can work with therapists to help their children recover.

The study, which appears today in JAMA Psychiatry and was led by Stanford’s Stewart Agras, MD, was the first large randomized clinical trial to compare two forms of family-based treatment for anorexia. The study included 167 anorexia patients, aged 12 to 18, at six medical centers in the United States and Canada.

In both treatments tested, a trained therapist met regularly with the patient and at least one other member of his or her family. One type of therapy focused on teaching parents how to get their child eating again at home, a method that Agras and Stanford eating disorder expert James Lock, MD, PhD, have researched extensively in the past. The other approach was broader, with the therapist and the family exploring problems in family dynamics and how to solve them. Patients and families in both treatment groups received 16 one-hour therapy sessions over a nine-month period, and patients’ recovery was assessed at the end of the therapy and again one year later.

Both therapies were equally effective in the long run, but the approach that focused on feeding was faster, and patients in that group were hospitalized fewer days during their treatment, which also made this method less expensive. The findings add to a growing list of scientific studies that are changing how physicians think about the families of patients with eating disorders, as our press release explains:

“For a long time, people blamed families for causing anorexia and thought they should be left out of treatment,” said Lock. “But this study suggests that, however you involve them, families can be useful, and that more focused family treatment works faster and more cost-effectively for most patients.” Lock directs the Comprehensive Eating Disorders Program at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.

The need for good treatments for anorexia in teens is bolstered by prior research demonstrating that the disease becomes more difficult to treat in adulthood, as Agras noted:

“The longer anorexia goes on, the more difficult it is to treat,” he said. “A great many people live chronically restricted lives because of this disease — they plan their days around undereating and overexercise — and quite a few die. The idea is to treat the disorder in adolescence to prevent more adults from becoming anorexic.”

Lock is the c0-author of the book Help Your Teenager Beat an Eating Disorder, which is designed to help parents conduct the feeding-based treatment examined in this study. Lock and Agras have both contributed to textbooks and manuals on eating disorder treatment for health care professionals.

Previously: Stanford study investigates how to prevent moms from passing on eating disorders, A growing consensus for revamping anorexia nervosa treatment and Possible predictors of longer-term recovery from eating disorders
Photo by Santiago Alvarez

Clinical Trials, Ethics, Genetics, NIH, Pediatrics

The promise and peril of genome sequencing newborns

NICUEven though doctors and researchers have made great strides in caring for patients in the past few decades, there are still many illnesses that are difficult to diagnose, let alone treat. Among the most heartbreaking cases are those newborns who come down with mysterious illnesses that defy medical expertise. But in recent years, doctors have turned to genetic sequencing in some of these cases to identify the culprit causes of the illnesses.

Last year, the National Institutes of Health funded four pilot projects looking into the efficacy and ethics of genetic screening for otherwise inexplicable illnesses in newborns. The first of the trials will begin next week at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, as reported in a recent story from Nature. The trial at Children’s Mercy Hospital will focus on rapid genome sequencing with a 24-hour turn-around. Genetic sequencing normally takes weeks, but some of these infants don’t survive that long. Doctors have used similar rapid genome sequencing to diagnose an infant with cardiac defects at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.

Earlier this year, I had the opportunity to report on a rare genetic mutation that leads young infants to develop inflammatory bowel disease. I spoke with some parents of children with the mutation, which was identified by sequencing the children’s exome – just the protein-producing part of the genome – as part of a new project (separate from the NIH trials) at the University of Toronto in Canada. As I explain in the piece, getting a bone marrow transplant early enough can help alleviate symptoms and save the child’s life.

The parents were uniformly grateful for the sequencing technology that made it possible to understand what was causing their baby’s illness, even in cases where the child didn’t survive long after diagnosis. One mother mentioned that realizing some of the best doctors in the country didn’t know what was ailing her daughter made the experience even more frightening. After months of worried confusion about their young children’s deteriorating health, for these parents to have an answer was a relief.

But because the technique is so new, several ethical details still need clarification – which the NIH study hopes to answer. From the Nature news story:

Misha Angrist, a genomic-policy expert at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, says that although the 24-hour genome process is impressive, it is not clear whether genomic sequencing of newborns will soon become standard practice. Many questions remain about who will pay for sequencing, who should have access to the data and how far clinicians should go in extracting genome information that is unrelated to the disease at hand. Then there is the question of how informative the process is. “I think it’s really important that we do these experiments so that we start to see what that yield is,” Angrist says.

All four teams will include an ethicist who will be responsible for dealing with questions like the ones Angrist raises. The other three trials at Boston Children’s Hospital, the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, and at the University of California, San Francisco are still awaiting approval from the Federal Drug Adminstration.

Previously: Stanford patient on having her genome sequenced: “This is the right thing to do for our family” When ten days = a lifetime: Rapid whole-genome sequencing helps critically ill newborn Assessing the challenges and opportunities when bringing whole-genome sequencing to the bedside Whole genome sequencing: The known knowns and the unknown unknowns
Photo by kqedquest

CDC, In the News, Infectious Disease, Neuroscience, Pediatrics

Stanford experts offer more information about enterovirus-D68

Stanford experts offer more information about enterovirus-D68

Below is an updated version of an entry that was originally posted on Sept. 26.

SONY DSCLast week, the California Department of Public Health confirmed that the season’s first four cases of enterovirus-D68 respiratory illness had been found in the state, three in San Diego County and one in Ventura County, with more expected to surface. As of Sept. 29, this makes California one of 40 states across the nation to be affected by EV-D68.

Health officials in Colorado are now investigating a handful of cases of paralysis in children there; the paralysis began a few weeks after respiratory illness and appears to be connected to EV-D68. Since the same virus was tentatively linked to paralysis cases in California children earlier this year, California officials are monitoring the situation closely.

Below, Yvonne Maldonado, MD, service chief of pediatric infectious disease at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, answers additional questions about the respiratory symptoms caused by this virus. Keith Van Haren, MD, a pediatric neurologist who has been assisting closely with the California Department of Public Health’s investigation, also comments on neurologic symptoms that might be associated with the virus.

Enteroviruses are not unusual. Why is there so much focus from health officials on this one, EV-D68?

Maldonado: The good news is that this virus comes from a very common family of viruses that cause most fever-producing illnesses in childhood. But it’s been more severe than other enteroviruses. Some hospitals in other parts of the country have had hundreds of children coming to their emergency departments with really bad respiratory symptoms. The fact that it’s been so highly symptomatic and that there has been a large volume of cases is why it has gotten so much attention.

Van Haren: It’s important to remember that most children and adults who are exposed to enteroviruses don’t get sick at all. A smaller percentage come down with fever and/or respiratory symptoms, as Dr. Maldonado has described. And as far as we can tell, it’s only a very, very small number of children, if any, who get paralysis, typically affecting one arm or leg. The Centers for Disease Control and the California Department of Public Health are still investigating to try to determine conclusively whether EV-D68 is causing neurologic symptoms, such as paralysis.

What do we know about the course of possible neurologic symptoms of EV-D68 and their potential treatments?

Van Haren: We’re still learning about the possible neurologic symptoms and how we might treat them. To start, we have a growing suspicion that EV-D68 may be associated with paralysis. In the patients we’ve seen with paralysis, progression of weakness appears to stop on its own, and recovery of strength is very slow and usually incomplete.

Which groups are most at risk?

Maldonado: Children with a history of asthma have been reported to have especially bad respiratory symptoms with this virus. It can affect kids of all ages, from infants to teens. So far, only one case has been reported in an adult, which makes sense because adults are more likely to have immunity to enteroviruses. We do worry more about young infants than older children, just because they probably haven’t seen the virus before and can get worse respiratory symptoms with these viral infections.

Van Haren: We don’t yet know who is most at risk for paralysis or other neurologic symptoms, but we are studying this carefully to find out why some children get sick and some do not. So far, it seems that the children who have been affected by paralysis were generally healthy prior to their illness.

What is the treatment for EV-D68?

Maldonado: There is no treatment that is specific to the virus. At home, parents can manage children’s fevers with over-the-counter medications, make sure they drink lots of fluids to avoid dehydration, and help them get plenty of rest. For children who are very ill, doctors will check for secondary illnesses such as bacterial pneumonia, which would be treated with antibiotics, and may hospitalize children who need oxygen or IV hydration to help them recover.

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Health and Fitness, Nutrition, Pediatrics, Public Health

Pediatrics group issues new recommendations for building strong bones in kids

Pediatrics group issues new recommendations for building strong bones in kids

MilkshelfOur bones function as retirement-savings accounts for calcium: We deposit the mineral into our bones when we’re young, then draw on the stores as we age. Too little calcium in the “savings account” puts people at risk for osteoporosis and debilitating bone fractures later in life.

This means that, although osteoporosis is usually seen as a disease of old age, pediatricians and parents need to pay attention to bone health. This week, the American Academy of Pediatrics released updated guidelines for pediatricians on how nutrition and exercise can improve bone density in their patients. The guidelines were co-authored by Stanford’s Neville Golden, MD, who is also an adolescent medicine specialist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. The report discusses calcium, which strengthens bones; vitamin D, which helps the body absorb calcium; and weight-bearing exercise, which promotes calcium deposition into the bones.

In addition to protecting against fractures in old age, the guidelines address the needs of kids whose bones are weakened by a variety of childhood and adolescent medical conditions, including juvenile osteoporosis, cystic fibrosis, lupus, celiac disease, cerebral palsy and anorexia nervosa.

A few highlights from the recommendations:

  • Children and adolescents should get their calcium mostly from food, not supplements. To meet calcium requirements, the committee recommends three or four daily servings of dairy foods (depending on the child’s age) and also suggests alternative food sources such as dark green veggies, beans, and calcium-fortified orange juice or breakfast cereals.
  • Vitamin D recommendations went up in 2011; the AAP agrees with the increased recommendations for all children and notes that kids using certain medications have even higher requirements than healthy children. Although the body can make vitamin D from sunlight, the report notes that kids are spending more time indoors and that sunscreen prevents vitamin D synthesis, making children more reliant on food and supplements to get enough vitamin D.
  • Soda often displaces milk in children’s diets, adding bone health to the list of reasons doctors should discourage soda consumption.
  • Weight-bearing exercise helps strengthen the bones. The report recommends activities such as walking, jogging, jumping and dancing over exercises such as swimming and cycling for building bone health.
  • Adolescent girls with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and the female athlete triad experience bone loss. In the past, some physicians have suggested that these young women could improve their bone density by taking oral contraceptives, but the report notes that randomized controlled trials have not found any evidence that oral contraceptives increase bone mass for these patients.

Previously: Goo inside bones provides structural support, study finds, New genetic regions associated with osteoporosis and bone fracture and Avoiding sun exposure may lead to vitamin D deficiency in Caucasians
Photo by Stephanie Booth

Big data, In the News, Patient Care, Pediatrics, Stanford News

Examining the potential of big data to transform health care

Examining the potential of big data to transform health care

Back in 2011, rheumatologist Jennifer Frankovich, MD, and colleagues at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford used aggregate patient data from electronic medical records in making a difficult and quick decision in the care of a 13-year-old girl with a rare disease.

Today on San Francisco’s KQED, Frankovich discusses the unusual case and the potential of big data to transform the practice of medicine. Stanford systems-medicine chief Atul Butte, MD, PhD, also weighed in on the topic in the segment by saying, “The idea here is [that] the scientific method itself is growing obsolete.” More from the piece:

Big data is more than medical records and environmental data, Butte says. It could (or already does) include the results of every clinical trial that’s ever been done, every lab test, Google search, tweet. The data from your fitBit.

Eventually, the challenge won’t be finding the data, it’ll be figuring out how to organize it all. “I think the computational side of this is, let’s try to connect everything to everything,” Butte says.

Frankovich agrees with Butte, noting that developing systems to accurately interpret genetic, medical or other health metrics is key if such practices are going to become the standard model of care.

Previously: How efforts to mine electronic health records influence clinical care, NIH Director: “Big Data should inspire us”, Chief technology officer of the United States to speak at Big Data in Biomedicine conference and A new view of patient data: Using electronic medical records to guide treatment

CDC, In the News, Infectious Disease, Pediatrics, Public Health

Q&A about enterovirus-D68 with Stanford/Packard infectious disease expert

Q&A about enterovirus-D68 with Stanford/Packard infectious disease expert

SONY DSCToday’s New York Times features a story on the accelerating spread of enterovirus-D68, a virus that is causing severe respiratory illness in children across the country. As the Times reports, some emergency departments in the Midwest have been so swamped with cases that they’ve had to divert ambulances to other hospitals. Although California is still only lightly affected, the state’s first four cases were confirmed by the California Department of Public Health late last week, with more expected to surface.

To help parents who may be wondering how to prevent, spot and care for EV-D68 infection, Yvonne Maldonado, MD, service chief of pediatric infectious disease at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, answered some common questions about the virus:

Enteroviruses are not unusual. Why is there so much focus from health officials on this one, EV-D68?

The good news is that this virus comes from a very common family of viruses that cause most fever-producing illnesses in childhood. But it’s been more severe than other enteroviruses. Some hospitals in other parts of the country have had hundreds of children coming to their emergency departments with really bad respiratory symptoms. The fact that it’s been so highly symptomatic and that there has been a large volume of cases is why it has gotten so much attention.

Have any patients at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford been affected with EV-D68?

As of today (Sept. 26), we have not yet had a documented case at our hospital. However, there have been a total of 226 confirmed cases in 38 states across the country. Some children who have this virus are probably not being tested, so the real number of cases nationwide is likely to be higher.

If your child has respiratory symptoms and you suspect EV-D68, what should you do?

The virus causes symptoms such as coughing, sneezing and runny nose. In some cases but not all, kids also have a fever. If your child has respiratory symptoms with or without a fever, especially if he or she also has a history of asthma, monitor your child at home. If you feel that he or she has been sick for a long period, is getting worse or is experiencing worsening of asthma or difficulty breathing, go see your pediatrician.

Which groups are most at risk?

Children with a history of asthma have been reported to have especially bad respiratory symptoms with this virus. It can affect kids of all ages, from infants to teens. So far, only one case has been reported in an adult, which makes sense because adults are more likely to have immunity to enteroviruses. We do worry more about young infants than older children, just because they probably haven’t seen the virus before and can get sicker with these viral infections.

How can the illness be prevented?

This virus is spread by contact with secretions such as saliva. If your children are sick, they should stay home from school to avoid spreading the illness to others. To avoid getting sick, stay at least three feet from people with symptoms such as coughing and runny nose, wash your hands frequently, and make sure your kids wash their hands often, too.

What is the treatment for EV-D68?

There is no treatment that is specific to the virus. At home, parents can manage children’s fevers with over-the-counter medications, make sure they drink lots of fluids to avoid dehydration, and help them get plenty of rest. For children who are very ill, doctors will check for secondary illnesses such as bacterial pneumonia, which would be treated with antibiotics, and may hospitalize children who need oxygen or IV hydration to help them recover.

Previously: Tips from a child on managing asthma
Photo by Michelle Brandt

Genetics, Pediatrics, Stanford News, Surgery, Transplants

Double kidney transplants leave Hawaii siblings raring to go

Double kidney transplants leave Hawaii siblings raring to go

kidney patients

Two kids; two cases of a rare, often fatal disease; and now, thanks to the work of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital doctors, two growing kids.

Both Julia Faisca, nearly 10, and Dominic Faisca, 8, suffer from cystinosis, a genetic disease that causes an amino acid — cystine — to build up in the kidney, eye and other places in the body.

The condition retarded the siblings’ growth, and damaged their kidneys. And by May 2013, Julia’s kidneys needed to be replaced. Fortunately, just three months later, she had a new kidney. And the Faisca family received the good news that a kidney was waiting for Dominic while they were flying to California from their home in Hawaii for a routine checkup for Julia.

“We’ve been busy — two kidney transplants in less than a year,” the kids’ mom, Natasha, said in a recent Inside Stanford Medicine story:

“Since their transplants, they aren’t picky eaters anymore,” Natasha said. “I joke with the doctors that the kids are eating me out of the house now. But it’s well worth it.”

Although they’ll always be on medication to protect their new kidneys and will need to return for twice-yearly checkups at Stanford, there’s finally a sparkle in their eyes, Natasha said.

“Dominic and Julia are growing like weeds and it’s really fun to watch them turn into regular kids,” said pediatric transplant specialist Paul Grimm, MD.

Both transplants were conducted by Waldo Concepcion, MD, a specialist in multi-organ transplantation.

Becky Bach is a science-writing intern with the Office of Communications and Public Affairs.

Previously: Baby born with rare, often-fatal kidney disease “doing well” at Packard Children’s Hospital, Contact sports OK for kids with one kidney, new study says and “Delivering hope” at Packard Children’s Hospital
Photo by Norbert von der Groeben

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