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Pediatrics

Patient Care, Pediatrics, Research, Stanford News, Surgery

Spanish-speaking families prefer surgical care in their native language, study finds

Spanish-speaking families prefer surgical care in their native language, study finds

Bruzoni-scrubsFive years ago, when Matias Bruzoni, MD, was a new pediatric surgical fellow at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, his fluency in Spanish meant that he often accompanied other surgeons to consult with Hispanic families who spoke little English.

“I went with the attending surgeon, and would help explain the operation in Spanish, and then the family would say to me ‘Great, would you mind being our surgeon?'” he recalled recently. “And I’d say, ‘But I’m a fellow’ and they would say ‘We’d rather stay with you.'”

The families greatly valued their linguistic and cultural connection to Bruzoni. As he had more of these interactions, Bruzoni realized the hospital’s entire pediatric general surgery team held a mostly untapped linguistic resource. Many of its members – including receptionists, nurse practitioners and triage staff – spoke fluent Spanish.

After Bruzoni finished his training, he organized this group of caregivers into the hospital’s Hispanic Center for Pediatric Surgery, which offers patients and families the ability to receive all of their pre- and post-surgical care in Spanish. Every interaction, from registering the patient to giving post-surgical instructions, happens in the families’ first language. Bruzoni wondered how this approach would compare to using trained medical interpreters, whose services are offered to all non-English-speaking families at the hospital.

A new study, published in the most recent issue of the Journal of Pediatric Surgery, shows what his research found. From our press release:

Spanish-speaking families that discussed their children’s care in Spanish reported a higher level of satisfaction and higher ratings of the quality of information they received compared with the families in the control group and those that worked through an interpreter. Spanish-speaking families rated the importance of discussing care in their native language more highly than English-speaking families, the study found.

Although socioeconomic status was not assessed in this study, Bruzoni noted that Hispanic families of low socioeconomic status may have an even greater need than others to receive care in their native language. “There is a big cultural barrier,” Bruzoni said. “Because of these patients’ circumstances, it is even more important to work with them using their own language.”

Bruzoni plans to continue studying how to deliver better surgical care to California’s growing population of Hispanic children.

Previously: Stanford student earns national recognition for research on medical communication, An app to break through language barriers with patients and Advice for parents whose kids need surgery
Photo courtesy of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford

Big data, Pediatrics, Research, Stanford News

Rare gene variants help explain preemies’ lung disease, Stanford study shows

Rare gene variants help explain preemies' lung disease, Stanford study shows

double-helixBecause they’re born before their lungs are fully mature, premature babies are at risk for a serious lung disease. Over the last several decades, this disease, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, has evolved into both a great medical success story and a persistent mystery. But a new Stanford study, published this week, is helping clarify the mysterious part.

First, the success story: Today, doctors can prevent BPD in many babies who would have died of it in the past. Artificial surfactant, which helps keep the air sacs of the lungs open, and extensive research on when it’s appropriate and safe to put preemies on a respirator have both greatly reduced the risk of lung injuries after birth, which can contribute to BPD. The improvement has been especially remarkable for babies born on the later end of the premature spectrum.

However, BPD is still a big problem for infants who arrive more than 12 weeks early. Doctors still have trouble figuring out which of these early preemies are at risk, and why. An editorial accompanying the new Stanford study, which appears in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, explains how scientists’ understanding of BPD has evolved:

It is now widely appreciated that the persistence of BPD is strongly linked with factors far beyond postnatal lung injury alone. Importantly, the BPD and related respiratory outcomes clearly have antenatal origins… Growing data support the concept that BPD is at least partly a “fetal disease.”

The editorial names several factors in the prenatal environment that weigh into BPD risk, including certain pregnancy complications and also maternal smoking or drug use. It’s not just the environment that plays into risk, though; twin studies also hint that genes also factor in, and knowing which genes are involved would provide enormous clues to how the disease occurs.

A prior Stanford study that attempted to connect common human gene variants to BPD risk didn’t turn up any good candidates. So, in the new study, the Stanford team focused instead on rare genetic variants. Using data from California’s extensive repository of newborn blood spots (small blood samples collected as part of the state’s program to screen newborns for genetic diseases), they turned up 258 rare gene variants for further investigation, all of which are linked to cell processes that could plausibly be involved in BPD.

“We hope these results will guide future research that can determine the most important pathophysiologic pathways leading to BPD,” said Hugh O’Brodovich, MD, the study’s senior author. The idea isn’t to target the genes themselves for treatment, but rather to help researchers figure out what goes wrong at a molecular level in the lungs of babies who get BPD.

“We also hope this work will be used to discover how clinicians can minimize the chance that an extremely premature baby will develop the disease,” he added.

Previously: Study of outcomes for early preemies highlights complex choices for families and doctors, Stanford-led study suggests changes to brain scanning guidelines for preemies and Counseling parents of the earliest-born preemies: A mom and two physicians talk about the challenges
Photo by James Gaither

Patient Care, Pediatrics, Public Health, Stanford News, Surgery

Story highlights teens’ life-changing weight loss

Story highlights teens' life-changing weight loss

Over on the Healthy, Happier Lives blog today: A look at how bariatric surgery, combined with a strict diet plan and exercise regime, benefited two San Jose, Calif. teens. The siblings lost a combined total of more than 200 pounds and in the process have reduced their risk of obesity-related medical complications and improved their quality of life. “It’s been a life-changing transformation,” Sophia Yen, MD, an adolescent medicine specialist with Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, commented.

Previously: The challenges of dieting and the promises of bariatric surgery and Bariatric surgery may help protect teen patients’ hearts

Mental Health, Pediatrics, Public Health, Stanford News

Stanford psychiatrist: It’s my “mission to help people develop to their full potential”

Carrion talking to patientHow can a person fully develop his or her potential, regardless of life circumstances? This is the question that brought Stanford child and adolescent psychiatrist Victor Carrion, MD, to his work on child anxiety and mood disorders. Carrion, who also directs the Stanford Early Life Stress and Pediatric Anxiety Research Program at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, just won the Silicon Valley Business Journal‘s Excellence in Healthcare award for his dedication to this question.

In an article describing this honor, Carrion says he’s always wanted to go into medicine and explore human behavior. While he’s very proud of the advances his lab has made in understanding the impact of early life stress on behavior, he also notes that there remain significant barriers to mental health in the region, including stigma and accessibility of treatment.

One of the innovative programs Carrion has been involved in is a study on the effectiveness of a health and wellness program in the Ravenswood City School District in East Palo Alto. The program teaches kids about mindfulness and positive habits that encourage calm, focused attitudes; Carrion and his colleagues will follow student participants over the next four years, tracking cognitive function, academic strengths and weaknesses, behavior, and stress-related hormone levels.

Previously: Stanford researchers use yoga to help underserve youth manage stress and gain focusProlonged fatigue and mood disorders among teensYoga classes may boost high school students’ mental well-beingLucile Packard Children’s Hospital partners with high schools on student mental health programs and More evidence that chronic stress may increase children’s risk of obesity
Photo courtesy of Stanford Medicine News

Pediatrics, Public Health

Back to school = back to the doctor

Back to school = back to the doctor

IMG_4070Many kids head back to school today; others, including my own, already have several days or weeks under their belt. Wherever your child is in the academic year, it’s not too late to schedule a back-to-school check-up with their doctor – a message relayed to readers in a recent Healthier, Happier Lives Blog post:

“For a lot of families, the yearly physical is the only time they come into our office because their children are generally healthy otherwise,” said Christianne Strickland, MD, a Stanford Children’s Health pediatrician…

The exam begins with checking a patient’s vital signs, height and weight, progress on the growth chart, and hearing and vision tests. Pediatricians like Strickland, or South Bascom colleagues Patricia Ferrari, MD, and Mary Beth Hughes, MD, also discuss immunization schedules with parents. If vaccines are warranted, they are administered after the exam.

“Back-to-school appointments allow us to take a complete history of the patient, which down the line helps us when they do come in with an illness,” said Strickland. “We make sure they are growing properly and don’t have physical problems that perhaps weren’t detected by the parents. The physical exam is really about preventative medicine.”

In the piece, Strickland also provides a few practical tips regarding screen-time and exercise (the importance of which was just discussed here on Friday.)

Previously: Tips for parents on back-to-school vaccinations
Photo by Michelle Brandt

Health and Fitness, Obesity, Pediatrics, Public Health

Taking breaks for physical activity may benefit children’s long-term health

Taking breaks for physical activity may benefit children’s long-term health

109320999_8b61257d14_zHere’s an eye-opening statistic: Children in the United States spend on average 6 hours per day sitting or reclining. As we head into the fall and winter months, it’s likely that the shorter, darker days and chilly weather will only add to our kids being more sedentary.

National exercise standards advocate for children getting at least 30 minutes of exercise daily to curb the risk of obesity, diabetes and other conditions. But for those days when achieving this goal isn’t possible, new research shows that short activity breaks can help offset a lack of exercise.

In the study (subscription required), researchers invited 28 healthy, normal-weight children to visit the National Institutes of Health on two separate occasions. During the first visit, participants were randomly assigned to two groups. One group watched TV, read or engaged in other sedentary activities for three hours; the other group alternated sitting with three minutes of moderate-intensity walking on a treadmill every 30 minutes for the three-hour period. On the return visit, the children switched groups. Each one took an oral glucose tolerance test at both visits. According to an NIH release:

On the days they walked, the children had blood glucose levels that were, on average, 7 percent lower than on the day they spent all 3 hours sitting. Their insulin levels were 32 percent lower.   Similarly, blood levels of free fatty acids — high levels of which are linked to type 2 diabetes — were also lower, as were levels of C-peptide, an indicator of how hard the pancreas is working to control blood sugar.

After the sessions, the children were allowed to choose their lunch from food items on a buffet table. Based on the nutrient content of each item, the researchers were able to calculate the calorie and nutrient content of what each child ate. The short, moderate-intensity walking sessions did not appear to stimulate the children to eat more than they ordinarily would, as the children consumed roughly the same amounts and kinds of foods after each of the sessions.

The study authors concluded that, if larger studies confirm their findings, interrupting periods of prolonged sitting with regular intervals of moderate-intensity walking might be an effective strategy for reducing children’s risk of diabetes and heart disease.

While regular walking breaks may not excite the average child, three-minute dance parties or stomping on bubbles are other options for getting kids out of their seat and moving.

Previously: Pediatrics group issues new recommendations for building strong bones in kids, Understanding the impact of sedentary behavior on children’s health and British government urging toddlers to ‘get physical’
Photo by Miika Silfverberg

Genetics, Pediatrics, Transplants, Women's Health

Rare African genes might reduce risks to pregnant women and their infants

Rare African genes might reduce risks to pregnant women and their infants

Khoe-SanWhen Hugo Hilton began working at Stanford as a young researcher several years ago, his supervisor set him to work on a minor problem so he could practice some standard lab techniques. His results, however, were anything but standard. His supervisor — senior research scientist Paul Norman — told him to do the work over, convinced the new guy had made a mistake. But Hilton, got the same result the second time, so Norman made him do it over again. And then again.

“This was Hugo’s first PCR reaction in our lab and I gave him the DNA,” recalled Norman, “and the very first one he did, he pulled out this mutation. I was convinced that he’d made a mistake.” Norman even quietly redid the work himself. But the gene variant was real.

Norman and colleagues had been studying the same group of immune genes for decades and he knew them like the back of his hand. Yet he was astonished by what Hilton had stumbled on — a mutation that switched a molecular receptor from one protein target to another. It would be as if you bent your house key ever so slightly and discovered it now opened the door to your neighbor’s apartment — but not yours.

And the mutation, far from causing some illness, might contribute to healthier mothers and babies. Parallel research at another institution suggests the odd gene most likely changes the placenta during early pregnancy, leading to better-nourished babies and a reduced risk of pre-eclampsia, a major cause of maternal death.

The surprising finding grew out of a long-term effort to understand how immune system genes make us reject organ transplants. A big part of that puzzle is understanding how much immune genes can vary. On the surfaces of ordinary cells are proteins called HLAs. Combinations of these proteins mark cells in a way that makes each person’s cells so nearly unique that the immune system can recognize cells as either self or not self. When a surgeon transplants a kidney, the recipient’s immune system can tell that the kidney is someone else’s — just from its cell surface HLA proteins. The patient’s immune system then signals its natural killer cells to attack the transplanted kidney. The key to all that specificity is the huge variation in the genes for the HLA proteins.

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Neuroscience, Pediatrics, Research

Stanford team uses brain scans to forecast development of kids’ math skills

Stanford team uses brain scans to forecast development of kids' math skills

multiplication-table-2Back in the third grade, I did not like math. It was boring! It was hard! Why did I have to memorize the times tables, anyway?

Did this mean I would have trouble with math for the rest of my life, or would I get over my eight-year-old’s funk and end up being good at it? At the time, there was no way to know. But now, in a longitudinal study published today in The Journal of Neuroscience, a team of Stanford researchers show that scans of third graders’ brains forecast which children will eventually do well in math and which of them will continue to struggle.

The resting MRI scans collected in the study evaluated the brain’s structure and connectivity between different brain regions in 43 eight-year-olds of normal intelligence. The researchers also gave the children several standardized tests outside the scanner. They then re-tested the kids’ math skills regularly for the next six years.

The brain scans were better than standard IQ, math or other tests at predicting how the children’s math skills would develop. Larger volume and greater connectedness of specific brain regions at age eight was linked to better math skills down the road. From our press release:

“A long-term goal of this research is to identify children who might benefit most from targeted math intervention at an early age,” said senior author Vinod Menon, PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. “Mathematical skills are crucial in our increasingly technological society, and our new data show which brain features forecast future growth in math abilities.”

In addition to identifying at-risk kids, the scans may help scientists design better ways to help them. Because the new work gives a baseline understanding of brain features in children with normal math skills, it may help guide efforts to strengthen the brains of kids with math difficulties. The researchers, who are now exploring how math tutoring changes the brain, encourage parents and teachers not to give up on children who have a hard time with math:

“Just because a child is currently struggling doesn’t necessarily mean he or she will be a poor learner in the future,” said [Tanya] Evans, [PhD, first author of the new study].

As for me, math never became my favorite subject. But I did eventually shake my early aversion to it. Since my job requires me to understand a range of mathematical concepts, I’m grateful — and I hope the new work being done at Stanford will allow today’s struggling third-graders to someday say the same.

Previously: A not so fearful symmetry: Applying neuroscience findings to teaching math, Peering into the brain to predict kids’ responses to math tutoring and New research tracks “math anxiety” in the brain
Photo by jmawork

Behavioral Science, Emergency Medicine, Health Disparities, Pain, Patient Care, Pediatrics, Research

Blacks, Hispanics and low-income kids with stomach aches treated differently in ERs

Blacks, Hispanics and low-income kids with stomach aches treated differently in ERs

crying-613389_1280When a child arrives in the emergency room complaining of a stomach pain, appendicitis is the last thing you want to miss, says KT Park, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics.

“The question is, ‘Does this patient have appendicitis – yes or no?,” he said. It is the most common immediate emergency that could bring a child into the emergency room with abdominal pain. If not treated in a timely manner, the appendix can burst, leading to infection or a host of other serious complications.

But kids arrive in the emergency room complaining of stomach aches all the time; most with perfectly healthy appendices. And what if you’re a doctor who has seen seven kids with more minor stomach problems one day? It might be tricky to spot that first case of appendicitis.

Unfortunately, misdiagnosis happens more often when the pediatric patient is black, Hispanic or low-income, according to a study published today in PLOS ONE led by Park and Stanford medical student Louise Wang.

“Our goal in this study is getting the word out about abdominal pain and appendicitis and the importance of the decisions made in the emergency room,” Wang said.

The researchers analyzed national data from 2 million pediatric visits to emergency rooms between 2004 and 2011 complaining primarily of abdominal pain. They found that blacks, Hispanics and low-income children were less likely to receive imaging that could help their physicians diagnose serious conditions like appendicitis. These patients were also less likely to be admitted to the hospital, but more likely to suffer perforated appendicitis, a clue that perhaps they didn’t receive adequate treatment in time, Park said. For example, low-income blacks were 65 percent more likely to have a perforated appendix compared to other children.

The study was not able to precisely determine why these disparities exist, Wang said. “What is the driving influence of these outcomes? Are these kids being mismanaged in the emergency department, or are they presenting at a later time in a more serious condition?,” she asked.

She and Park have a few ideas, based on other findings and their personal experience. Minorities and low-income families are more likely to use the emergency room as a first-stop for more minor conditions, rather than visiting their primary care doctor or pediatrician.

“This is a very delicate topic,” Park said. “Physicians are humans and there is potentially some intuitive thinking that goes on about the probabilities of various diagnoses more common in certain patient groups, potentially leading to differences in how clinicians perceive the acuity of a patient’s status.”

Appendicitis can be tricky to diagnose, a task made even harder when patients are young and unable to clearly describe their pain, Park said.

“The psychology of physicians is an area needing further evaluation,” Park said. “We have internal biases that we often are not even aware of. We want to be objective, but it’s never a black-and-white decision making tree.”

Previously: A young child, a falling cabinet, and a Life Flight rescue, New test could lead to increase of women diagnosed with heart attack and Exploring how the Affordable Care Act has affected number of young adults visiting the ER
Photo by amandacatherine

Cancer, Events, Patient Care, Pediatrics

Girls’ Day Out event helps unite — and nurture — teens battling cancer

Untitled designThere are many treatments, therapies and drugs for cancer, but sometimes a day of pampering with friends is just what the doctor ordered.

That’s why nine teenage girls being treated for cancer at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford  were lavished with a bit of tender loving care — and some quality bonding time — at the seventh annual Girls’ Day Out.

The festivities began at 8:30 on Wednesday night with a limo ride from the hospital to TOVA Day Spa in the Fairmont Hotel in downtown San Jose. At TOVA, teens that had attended Girls’ Day Out events from years before had the opportunity to reconnect, chat and welcome newcomers as they received massages, pedicures, manicures, hairstyling and a gourmet lunch. This story in the San Jose Mercury News explains:

“It’s really fun and a great getaway; it’s really nice to be with people who won’t keep asking ‘what happened to your arm,’ ” said incoming Saratoga High School freshman Simran Mallik, 14. She was left with a scar on her arm after undergoing treatment for Ewing Sarcoma, a type of bone cancer. “I feel like I connect with them more; it’s just easier to communicate.”

Tova Yaron, the owner of TOVA Day Spa, has sponsored this event for the past seven years with support from the Children Having Exceptional Educational and Recreational Support (CHEERS) program that’s a part of the 19 for Life Foundation. At the event, Yaron and her staff donate their time and expertise to create a day of fun, and free spa treatments, for the girls.

TOVA’s spa treatments are a refreshing break from the kind of treatments and therapies the teens are used to receiving as cancer patients, but perhaps the most important gift the girls receive is the opportunity to relax and be themselves among friends who understand what it’s like to be a teenager battling cancer.

“It’s interesting to see how other people are after they’ve gone through (cancer treatment),” said Vivian Lou 15, a student at James Logan High School in Union City who was diagnosed with Wilms Tumor, a type of kidney cancer, five years ago. “It’s nice because I don’t have to feel weird about it because they’ve also been through it.”

“I wish I could do more,” said Yaron. “I am honored, they are lovely girls, they have amazing attitudes, they are brave beyond belief, they are amazing. They are inspiring us with their bravery.”

Previously: Not just for kids: A discussion of play and why we all need to do itHow social connection can improve physical and mental health and The scientific importance of social connections for your health
Photo by Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford

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