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Global Health, Pediatrics, Stanford News

Stanford Medicine magazine tells why a healthy childhood matters

Stanford Medicine magazine tells why a healthy childhood matters

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I’ve forgotten most of my childhood experiences – which is perfectly normal. But apparently my body remembers many of those experiences – and I learned while editing the new Stanford Medicine magazine that’s normal too. The fall issue’s special report, “Childhood: The road ahead,” is full of stories of researchers realizing the impact early experiences can have on adult health. Some of their discoveries are surprising.

“Some people think kids are protected by virtue of being kids. In fact, the opposite is true,” pediatric psychiatrist Victor Carrion, MD, told writer Erin Digitale, PhD, when she interviewed him for her story on the long-term effects of childhood trauma. Other writers found the same goes for other types of early damage: Kids are resilient but they also carry hidden scars.

The report also includes a Q&A with former President Jimmy Carter on discrimination against women and girls, which he considers the most serious human rights problem on Earth. The online version of the magazine includes audio of the Carter conversation.

Other highlights of the magazine’s special report include:

  • Go to bed“: An article on the devastating toll inadequate sleep takes on teens, with an update on efforts, including a Stanford project, to fix the problem.
  • When I grow up“: A report on the growing need for support of chronically ill children making the jump to adult care, and on the progress that’s being made.
  • Beyond behavior“: A story about a high school student’s return to health after an assault, and the new type of therapy that helped her.
  • Rocket men“: A feature about three rocket-combustion experts teaming up with a pediatrician to analyze the breath of critically ill children at warp speed.
  • Warm welcomes“: An article on blending Western medicine into traditional culture to reduce newborn mortality in the developing world.
  • Bad for the bone“: A quick look at a new way to study the toll of childhood disease on bones.

The issue also has an article on a surprising role for viruses in human embryos, as well as a report from India on how vision, investment and medical know-how has brought about an ambulance system — now 10 years old and one of the most important advances in global health today. The online version includes a video showing the ambulance system in action.

Many thanks to Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, which helped support this issue.

Previously: This summer’s Stanford Medicine magazine shows some skin, Stanford Medicine magazine reports on time’s intersection with health and Stanford Medicine magazine traverses the immune system
Illustration from the cover of Stanford Medicine magazine’s fall 2015 issue by Christopher Silas Neal

Pediatrics, Public Safety, Stanford News

A reminder to parents to be careful of open windows

A reminder to parents to be careful of open windows

7867279958_6d74bdf4f7_z croppedPreventing falls from windows may not be something that’s on the mind of every parent – especially this time of year. But as the Indian summer continues here in the Bay Area and elsewhere, windows in homes may be left open, leaving kids vulnerable to accidents.

Over on the Healthier, Happier Lives Blog yesterday, Daniel Imler, MD, assistant professor of pediatric emergency medicine, talked about injuries caused by falls, noting that the most common kinds are extremity fractures, traumatic brain injuries, and damage to the cervical spine. After saying that “window screens only offer minimal help,” he also outlined some preventive tips for parents:

Move furniture away from windows and prevent children from climbing over. Locking all closed doors and windows is a great preventative measure as well. If you do open a window safety locks can help keep the window open only 4 inches for safety. Some families choose to install windows that open from the top down on floors above the ground level.

Previously: A young child, a falling cabinet, and a Life Flight rescueCarseats save lives, but only if kids are buckled in and Rattled by one child’s injury, a whole family becomes accident-prone
Photo by Kalexander2010

Chronic Disease, Palliative Care, Parenting, Pediatrics

Missing out on “normal”: Advice from an expert on how to help kids with serious illnesses

Missing out on "normal": Advice from an expert on how to help kids with serious illnesses

Erica Medina and mom Jan 2012 #2When I first met Erica Medina in 2012, she was already practiced at living in two worlds. Then 17, she loved the ordinary teenage realm of high school classes, basketball and volleyball games, and trips to the mall with her friends. But since her diagnosis with juvenile idiopathic arthritis at age 11, she had also spent a lot of time in the medical world, where she and her doctors struggled to manage the pain caused by a disease that has no cure.

The story I wrote about Erica explained how the two worlds sometimes collided:

Back pain made it taxing to sit through school lectures, go on field trips or walk through the mall with friends. It wasn’t just the pain that bothered her: “When I was younger I hated taking my meds,” Erica said, adding that it felt like “giving up” to take pain medicine.

Stephanie [Erica’s mom] was glad Erica’s doctors tackled this issue head-on. “They convinced her that treating pain has nothing to do with weakness,” she said.

Although juvenile idiopathic arthritis is fairly rare, Erica’s longing for normalcy is not. Children and teenagers with all kinds of chronic and serious conditions have the same desire, says pediatric psychologist Barbara Sourkes, PhD, who directs the palliative care program at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.

A big part of Sourkes’ role is to help children, teenagers and their families navigate the divide between living with a difficult diagnosis and simply being a kid. She’s summarized her insights about this in a thoughtful piece on the blog for Digging Deep, a publication designed to help kids facing health challenges. Young people like Erica “commute” between the normal and medical worlds, “an extraordinary challenge,” Sourkes says. From her piece, here is some of her advice for families and others on how to help:

Be aware and sensitive to the importance of feeling “normal” – as normal as possible – for all children and adolescents living with illness. While we typically focus more on adolescents’ desire to “fit in,” even very young children are sensitive to being “different.” Help them focus on and remember what aspects of their lives – and of themselves – are still the same despite the illness.

“Missing out on things” comes in two categories: (1) missing a specific, often special event or activity (e.g. a celebration, a trip) and (2) missing out on life in general (day-to-day daily life, in all its routine).

Adults tend to focus more on the first category, in part because these are events that stand out from the backdrop of daily life. Allow the child to express disappointment / anger / sadness at the prospect of missing the event – do not try to minimize these feelings. After the event, it is very important to let children know that people asked about them and that their presence was missed. It makes the “missing out on things” a little more shared and less one-sided. When realistically possible, promise the child that they will participate in a similar event at a future time.

The second category of “missing out on life in general” is more ongoing and subtle, and probably has more impact on adolescents than on young children. It is also harder to address, since it encompasses all the frustration and sadness of the impact of the illness. Most important is simply to listen to what the children say, without trying to distract them or “problem solve” or cheer them up. These are times that they may just want to be heard and to have their hardship acknowledged.

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Neuroscience, Pediatrics, Research

Tutoring changes the brain in kids with math learning disabilities

Tutoring changes the brain in kids with math learning disabilities

One-on-one tutoringA new Stanford study, publishing today in Nature Communications, sheds light on how to help children with math learning disabilities. One-on-one cognitive tutoring improves math performance in these children and also normalizes brain activity in several regions important for numerical problem solving, the research found.

The findings are important because math learning disabilities often fall off educators’ and parents’ radar. (Everyone has heard of dyslexia, but its numerical equivalent, dyscalculia? Not so much.) Yet math learning disabilities can hamper a child’s ability to gain basic life skills such as managing time and money, and can prevent children from growing up to pursue math- and science-related careers.

The new study is similar to another recent experiment that demonstrated alleviation of math anxiety with tutoring. Both studies are the work of the Stanford MathBrain Project, directed by Vinod Menon, PhD. Teresa Iuculano, PhD, a postdoctoral scholar working with Menon, is the new study’s lead author.

In the new research, 30 children in third grade received eight weeks of one-on-one tutoring in basic arithmetic skills; half of the kids had math learning disabilities and half did not. The instructors adjusted the sessions’ pace and emphasis individually for each child, helping students past bottlenecks in their learning without making them feel like they might be falling behind their peers. All of the children got MRI brain scans before and after tutoring.

Before tutoring began, the kids with math learning disabilities had abnormal function in a network of brain areas involved in solving numerical problems, including the parietal, prefrontal and ventral temporal-occipital areas. Kids without math learning disabilities did not show these problems. After tutoring, the differences between the two groups’ brain scans disappeared. The children’s math performance also improved, in sync with the brain changes.

These findings suggest that tutoring actually fixes the brain issues at the root of math learning disabilities, rather than providing children with a work-around that circumvents the real problem.

“We demonstrate that, in parallel with performance normalization, 1:1 tutoring elicits extensive functional brain changes in children with math learning disabilities, normalizing their brain activity to the level of neurotypical peers,” the researchers wrote in their paper.

The scientists want to conduct follow-up studies to find out how long the effects of tutoring last. Their new discoveries also lay a framework for studying how to intervene in other forms of learning disabilities.

Previously: Stanford team shows that one-on-one tutoring relieves math anxiety in children, Stanford team uses brain scans to forecast development of kids’ math skills and New research tracks “math anxiety” in the brain
Photo by U.S. Department of Education

FDA, Health Policy, Nutrition, Pediatrics, Public Health, Research, Stanford News

How much Bisphenol A is okay?

How much Bisphenol A is okay?


A new study came out this week that happened to remind me of one of my pet peeves about certain biomedical studies — choosing an “outcome” measure that doesn’t tell you what you really want to know. The study, which was led by Stanford postdoctoral fellow Jennifer Hartle, DrPH, and estimated the amount of BPA a child is exposed to in the course of a normal school day, was great. But her description of EPA safety tests on the plastics component Bisphenol A, or BPA — done back in the 1980s — made me think back to earlier work by University of California, Berkeley biologist Tyrone Hayes, PhD.

In the 1990s, the agricultural herbicide atrazine was safety tested by exposing frogs to low doses of atrazine as they developed from eggs to tadpoles to frogs. The adult frogs didn’t die or show obvious deformities such as extra legs, so the pesticide was deemed safe. But Hayes took a closer look and, in 2002, found that even at very low levels of atrazine exposure, male frogs were producing eggs instead of sperm.

So no gross deformities if you just looked at the frogs for 30 seconds. But in fact the animals had experienced a dramatic change in their health and biology. The lesson is that, in biology, sometimes the right outcome measure is something you have to really look for. There is a lot more to the Hayes-atrazine story.

But back to the current study: Hartle and her colleagues turned their attention to national school breakfast and lunch programs, which provide nutritious meals to 30 million kids every year but also deliver small amounts of BPA, an estrogen mimic that messes with hormones. Children’s meals are disproportionately packaged in tiny one-meal containers. Those tiny packages of apple sauce and juice have a greater BPA-emitting surface area than a big carton or can for the amount of food. And school kids often eat meals off plastic trays with plastic forks and spoons. For children who eat a lot of meals at school, it can add up.

According to Hartle’s paper, appearing today in the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, the question isn’t whether the kids are getting BPA in their meals — they are — but whether any of them are getting doses of BPA that could affect their long-term health. Based on those 1980s studies, the EPA estimates that BPA is safe at chronic exposure levels below 50 μg per kilogram of body weight per day. Happily, Hartle and her colleagues found that children are getting far less than that — as little as 0.0021 μg for a low-BPA breakfast to 0.17 μg for a high-BPA lunch. Everything should be hunky-dory, right?

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Clinical Trials, Mental Health, Parenting, Pediatrics, Research, Stanford News

Parents can help their teens recover from bulimia, say Stanford researchers

Parents can help their teens recover from bulimia, say Stanford researchers

Mom&teenTeenagers with bulimia nervosa benefit from their parents’ help in stopping their eating disorder. In fact, a therapy that involves parents works better for teens than one that does not, according to the first large head-to-head comparison in adolescents of two well-known bulimia treatments.

The findings are described in a study of 130 young people with bulimia that was published last week in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

The research, which was jointly led by Stanford’s James Lock, MD, PhD, and a longtime collaborator, Daniel Le Grange, PhD, compared an approach tailored to teens with one commonly used in adults. In family-based therapy, the bulimia patient and a parent work together to stop the disordered eating behavior. In contrast, in cognitive behavioral therapy, which is widely recognized as the best approach for bulimic adults, there is more focus on changing abnormal thoughts about food and less emphasis on behavior change.

At the end of six months of treatment, 39 percent of patients in family-based therapy had abstained from the binge-and-purge cycle of bulimia for at least four weeks. Only 20 percent of those in the cognitive behavioral therapy group had done the same. The gap persisted six months after treatment ended, though it seemed to have closed by a year after the end of treatment.

Lock, who directs the Comprehensive Eating Disorders Program at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, said the findings are not surprising, given that teens are at a different stage of the illness and have different cognitive capabilities than adults with bulimia. But they are very important, since they suggest that the family-based approach is a faster way for young patients to recover from bulimia. From our press release about the study:

“The strategy for cognitive behavioral therapy requires a fair amount of abstract reasoning, motivation and persistence that often has not reached full capacity in teens,” [Lock] said, adding that doctors may need to decide on a case-by-case basis whether a teen would benefit from one treatment versus the other. “The cognitive and developmental context is very different for teens than for adult patients,” he said.

And it’s normal for teenagers to need their parents’ assistance in navigating difficult situations, he added. “The big take-home message is that families can really help their kids with bulimia nervosa.”

Previously: Family therapy an effective way to treat anorexic teens, Incorporating the family to help teens overcome eating disorders and Families can help their teens recover from anorexia, new study shows
Photo by J.K. Califf

Fertility, Pediatrics, Public Health, Research, Sexual Health, Stanford News, Women's Health

IUD is overlooked as excellent birth control for teens, Stanford expert says

IUD is overlooked as excellent birth control for teens, Stanford expert says


When teenagers think of birth control, the pill and condoms are likely the first to come to mind – and indeed the pill is the number one choice of contraceptive among adolescents. But according to Stanford ob/gyn expert Paula Hillard, MD, the IUD is a long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) excellently suited for adolescents. In an editorial published in the October issue of Journal of Adolescent Health, Hillard urges doctors to consider the benefits of LARCs for young women.

The IUD and other LARCs don’t require consistent, correct daily use, so they’re easier to use and less likely to fail. In addition to being extremely effective, IUDs have a high rate of satisfaction among adolescents. Some types of IUDs can also be used therapeutically for problems like heavy bleeding or cramping. LARCs are also cost-effective over time, and the initial investment is no longer a barrier in California due to the Family PACT program, which allows teens to confidentially access birth control at no cost. In addition, the Affordable Care Act mandates that contraceptive methods must be covered in most cases without a co-pay.

So what are the barriers to use? They include misconceptions and lack of information on the part of both teens and providers, as well as provider concerns about the insertion procedure in young women who haven’t given birth.

In an email, Hillard told me:

Many physicians and most adolescents are unaware that modern IUDs provide contraception that is 20 times more effective than birth control pills, the patch or the ring. IUDs are a method of birth control that is very safe, very effective, and “forgettable”.  IUDs are considered to be “top tier” contraceptive methods (along with subdermal implants and sterilization, which is not appropriate for typical adolescents) by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

IUD use has increased from 0.5 percent to 2.5 percent among teens 15-19 years old over the past decade. Still, around 50 percent of obstetrician-gynecologists don’t consider an IUD as a first-line contraceptive for adolescents.

Hillard closes her piece with a discussion of the challenges and importance of counseling for adolescents. Proper counseling includes giving the most effective options priority, and discussing side-effects up front (which improves adherence to contraceptive regimens, including in adults). She writes:

It remains important for us as clinicians to fight for reproductive justice and contraceptive access for all women, with the elimination of barriers including costs. In our counseling, we need to honor principles of informed consent, be aware of power differences between ourselves and our patients, be certain that our counseling is not coercive, and carefully respect our patients’ choices.

Previously: Research supports IUD use for teens, Will more women begin opting for an IUD?, Study shows women may overestimate the effectiveness of common contraceptives and Study: IUDs are a good contraceptive option for teens
Photo by Liz Henry

Global Health, Health Disparities, Pediatrics, Stanford News, Technology

Sunshine solves a life-threatening newborn health problem — with a little help from Stanford experts

Sunshine solves a life-threatening newborn health problem — with a little help from Stanford experts

jaundice-greenhouseWhen pediatrician Tina Slusher, MD, began caring for newborns in Nigeria in 1989, she saw two big threats to the babies’ health: severe jaundice and tetanus.

“I thought, ‘Tetanus will go away with immunization, but nobody really seems to understand this jaundice problem,'” Slusher, a global pediatrics expert at the University of Minnesota, told me recently. In developing countries, well over 150,000 babies a year currently die or suffer severe brain damage from jaundice. “They still aren’t getting treated,” Slusher says.

But now, thanks to Slusher and her colleagues, that is set to change. She is the lead author on a scientific paper in the New England Journal of Medicine that evaluated a low-tech, inexpensive method for treating jaundice with filtered sunlight. The technology was conceived and built at Stanford, by a team led by neonatal jaundice expert David Stevenson, MD.

Newborn jaundice is caused by a delay after birth in development of the baby’s ability to metabolize compounds released in the breakdown of red blood cells. In the U.S. and other developed countries, most cases are treated with phototherapy. But putting a baby under a blue-light-emitting lamp isn’t feasible in places that lack steady electricity. The team members, who also included doctors and researchers at the Massey Street Children’s Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria, wondered if they could safely use filtered sunshine instead.

From our press release about the new study:

Some mothers and babies sat under outdoor canopies that filtered out harmful wavelengths from sunlight, but still allowed jaundice-treating blue wavelengths to reach the babies’ skin. The filtered-sunlight treatment was as safe and effective as the blue-light lamps traditionally used to treat infant jaundice.

“This research has the potential for global impact,” said the study’s senior author, David Stevenson, MD, the Harold K. Faber Professor in Pediatrics and senior associate dean for maternal and child health at Stanford. “All babies can get jaundice. In settings with no access to modern devices, we’ve shown we can use something that’s available all around the planet — sunlight — to treat this dangerous condition.” Stevenson also directs the Johnson Center for Pregnancy and Newborn Services at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.

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Autoimmune Disease, Chronic Disease, FDA, Immunology, Pediatrics, Research, Stanford News

Can a safe, cheap pill prevent type 1 diabetes?

Can a safe, cheap pill prevent type 1 diabetes?

happy pillType 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder once known as juvenile diabetes because it tends to strike during adolescence or earlier, affects one in every 300 people. With the diagnosis comes the certainty of a lifetime of insulin injections, made necessary due to the destruction of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas by a misguided immune system.

Insulin is a hormone that alerts the body to the presence of glucose in the blood, typically after a meal. In insulin’s absence, the body’s tissues fail to take up glucose, a key energy source. Without several-times-daily insulin shots, type 1 diabetes patients’ blood sugar levels can shoot up to dangerous heights – a condition called hyperglycemia.

There’s never been any way to prevent type 1 diabetes, although it can be predicted based on the detection of self-targeting antibodies in a blood test. But screening for type 1 diabetes this way hasn’t been particularly useful, because there’s been nothing to be done for patients diagnosed in the asymptomatic phase except wait for them to become hyperglycemic and put them on insulin.

Now, an elaborate mouse study by Stanford immunologist and structural biologist Paul Bollyky, MD, PhD, shows that it might be possible to intervene during the asymptomatic stage of type 1 diabetes – using a pharmaceutical compound that’s been on the global market for more than 40 years and has a terrific safety record – thereby stopping the immune system’s stupid but relentless destruction of the pancreas’s vital insulin-producing cells, and stave off hyperglycemia indefinitely.

Bollyky and his colleagues first showed that a particular substance, hyaluronan, builds up near insulin-producing cells in mice developing the murine equivalent of type 1 diabetes, confirming earlier findings in postmortem human pancreatic tissue that had been supplied to Bollyky’s team by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

“We wondered what would happen if we prevented that buildup,” Bollyky told me when I interviewed him for my news release on the study. “And we knew a drug that does that.”

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Mental Health, Parenting, Pediatrics, Pregnancy, Public Health, Research, Women's Health

Sleep-deprivation and stress among factors contributing to smoking relapse after childbirth

Sleep-deprivation and stress among factors contributing to smoking relapse after childbirth

2473235415_0584b78298_zSmoking can make it more difficult to get pregnant and it can contribute to complications after conception and endanger the health of babies as they grow. For these reasons, many women quit smoking when they are trying to conceive and during pregnancy. But an estimated 40 percent of women in the United States who kick the nicotine habit for the health of their unborn child relapse within six months after delivery.

New research published in the journal Addiction suggests that the stress of becoming a parent could be a significant factor in why some moms resume smoking after childbirth. In the study, British researchers interviewed 1,000 mothers about factors that influenced their relapse or contributed to them staying smoke-free. Lead researcher Caitlin Notley, PhD, discussed the findings in a PsychCentral article:

One of the most striking things that we found is that women’s beliefs about smoking are a major barrier to remaining smoke-free. Many felt that smoking after the birth of their child was acceptable provided they protected their babies from secondhand smoke.

Their focus is, admirably, on the health of the baby, but they often do not think about the long-term health consequences for themselves as mothers.

We also found that women who saw smoking as a way of coping with stress were more likely to relapse. And that feeling low, lonely, tired, and coping with things like persistent crying were also triggers. Women reported that cravings for nicotine, which had lessened or stopped during pregnancy, returned.

The majority of women who had successfully remained smoke free said that the support of their partner was a strong factor. Partners who gave up smoking, or altered their own smoking behaviors, were a particularly good influence. And those who helped ease the stress of childcare were also praised by women who had resisted the urge to light up

In addition to receiving help from their partners, moms said support from health professionals was another positive contributor to them being able to resist urges to smoke and manage stress.

Previously: Study shows mothers receiving fertility treatments may have an elevated risk of depression, Examining how fathers’ postpartum depression affects toddlers, A telephone lifeline for moms with postpartum depression, What other cultures can teach us about managing postpartum sleep deprivation and Is postpartum depression more of an urban problem?
Photo by Samantha Webber

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