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It’s one of the hardest questions in medicine: Should hospitals ever stop spending money to avert certain preventable deaths?

It’s one of the hardest questions in medicine: Should hospitals ever stop spending money to avert certain preventable deaths?

At the recent Stanford Women's Health Forum, Kate Shaw, a clinical associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, spoke about the evolution and history of birth control.

At the recent Stanford Women's Health Forum, Kate Shaw, a clinical associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, spoke about the evolution and history of birth control.

The composition of the microbiome can be adjusted by pairing bacterial species with their favorite foods, a new Stanford Medicine study suggests.

The composition of the microbiome can be adjusted by pairing bacterial species with their favorite foods, a new Stanford Medicine study suggests.

The president of the Association of American Medical Colleges details factors that contribute to physician burnout and broad cultural changes that can help.

The president of the Association of American Medical Colleges details factors that contribute to physician burnout and broad cultural changes that can help.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is now recommending that men aged 55 to 69 should talk with their doctors about prostate-specific antigen screening.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is now recommending that men aged 55 to 69 should talk with their doctors about prostate-specific antigen screening.

Exposure to 'third-hand smoke' — that is, the chemicals left behind on household surfaces after smoke has dissipated — increases the severity of asthma symptoms in mice. Stanford researchers are working to learn how this happens, and whether it might be possible to protect people with asthma from this exposure.

Exposure to 'third-hand smoke' — that is, the chemicals left behind on household surfaces after smoke has dissipated — increases the severity of asthma symptoms in mice. Stanford researchers are working to learn how this happens, and whether it might be possible to protect people with asthma from this exposure.

Ask a child with asthma how easily he or she can breathe, and you won’t get an objective answer. But where Q&A fails, technology can take over, according to a team of Stanford researchers who are developing a way to predict asthma attacks in advance.

Ask a child with asthma how easily he or she can breathe, and you won’t get an objective answer. But where Q&A fails, technology can take over, according to a team of Stanford researchers who are developing a way to predict asthma attacks in advance.

Social media, unlike memoirs, can problematically create an image of a sanitized, perfect existence that is removed from real lives, Jacqueline Genovese writes.

Social media, unlike memoirs, can problematically create an image of a sanitized, perfect existence that is removed from real lives, Jacqueline Genovese writes.

In an update, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends exercise to prevent falls in older adults at risk, but recommends against using vitamin D supplements for this purpose.

In an update, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends exercise to prevent falls in older adults at risk, but recommends against using vitamin D supplements for this purpose.

In a new book, Paul Ehrlich lays out the claim that modern life has been harmful to smaller jaws, which he says leads to problems ranging from heart disease to sleep apnea.

In a new book, Paul Ehrlich lays out the claim that modern life has been harmful to smaller jaws, which he says leads to problems ranging from heart disease to sleep apnea.

The American dream of children growing up to earn more than their parents is harder to achieve than it used to be, and big data gives valuable insight into how it has changed.

The American dream of children growing up to earn more than their parents is harder to achieve than it used to be, and big data gives valuable insight into how it has changed.

In one of the largest observational studies on fitness and heart disease, researchers examined found that people with higher levels of grip strength, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness had reduced risks of heart attacks and stroke.

In one of the largest observational studies on fitness and heart disease, researchers examined found that people with higher levels of grip strength, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness had reduced risks of heart attacks and stroke.

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