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Stanford IVF research on Time's top ten list


Congratulations to Stanford researcher Renee Reijo Pera, PhD: Somehow we missed it last week, but her recent research showing how to greatly improve the accuracy of embryo selection for in vitro fertilization has been named one of the Top Ten Medical Breakthroughs of 2010 by Time:

For couples choosing to start a family with in vitro fertilization (IVF), the odds are not always in their favor. The procedure, even under the best circumstances, has a 30% chance of resulting in a live birth on average. So it was welcome news indeed when Stanford University researchers reported on a new method for selecting the strongest embryos, which would most likely result in a pregnancy and live birth.

Previously: Stanford research advances Nobel-winning IVF work
Photo by Elina Nilsson

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