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Ask Stanford Med: Stefanos Zenios taking questions on health-care innovation and entrepreneurship

Later this month, business and government leaders, entrepreneurs, academics and students will gather at Stanford for the 2012 Healthcare Innovation Summit to examine the forces shaping the future of health care and discuss practical solutions to some of our toughest health-care problems.

The event will be held on April 25 at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Panel sessions will explore topics such as the challenges and opportunities created by health-care reform, how to operationalize the promise of genomics and the idea of applying user-centered design to improve the impact and scale of new health-care products and services.

To get the discussion started in anticipation of the conference, we've asked Stefanos Zenios, PhD, faculty organizer of the summit, to respond to your questions on health-care innovation and entrepreneurship.

An expert on innovation, Zenios is the founding director of the business school's new Program in Healthcare Innovation. He is the lead author of Biodesign: The Process of Innovating Medical Technologies, a widely praised textbook on the entrepreneurial process for medical devices, and a co-founder of Konnectology.com, a suite of interactive guides for patients considering complex medical treatments such as kidney transplant

Questions can be submitted to Zenios by either sending a tweet that includes the hashtag #AskSUMed or posting your question in the comments section below. We'll collect questions until April 13 at 5 pm. In submitting questions, please abide by the following ground rules:

  • Stay on topic
  • Be respectful to the person answering your questions
  • Be respectful to one another in submitting questions
  • Do not monopolize the conversation or post the same question repeatedly
  • Kindly ignore disrespectful or off topic comments
  • Twitter handles and/or names may be used in the responses

Zenios will respond to a selection of the questions submitted, but not all of them, in a future Q&A published on Scope.

Previous Q&As from the Ask Stanford Med series are available in the Ask Stanford Med category.

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