Published by
Stanford Medicine

Addiction, Pain, Podcasts, Stanford News

Is a push to treat chronic pain pressuring doctors to prescribe opioids to addicts?

Is a push to treat chronic pain pressuring doctors to prescribe opioids to addicts?

In a recent New England Journal of Medicine Perspective piece (subscription required), Stanford psychiatrist Anna Lembke, MD, explored why physicians today experience intense professional pressure to prioritize pain treatment above other competing clinical issues.

Lembke discusses her work more in-depth in a podcast posted today on the blog Substance Abuse 411. During the conversation, she touched on reasons contributing to prioritizing pain treatment above other competing clinical issues and offered recommendations to address such problems.

Previously: Why doctors prescribe opioids to patients they know are abusing them

One Response to “ Is a push to treat chronic pain pressuring doctors to prescribe opioids to addicts? ”

  1. dave Says:

    Medicines longstanding neglect and prejudice toward pain care will not change without energetic government intervention.Lembke is mistaken to believe there are such pressures- especially given the fact that only 6 states require any education in pain care. Texas is one of the few states sanctioning doctors for failing to provide adequate pain care- there is no such case in NYS. According to Dr Volkow doctors on average receive 7 hours of education in pain care- veterinarians receive 75 hours of education in pain care. Our veterinarians treat pain more humanely and more professionally then our doctors. Dr Lembke-as Dr Virchow said- there are two causes of disease- one pathological and one political. Youre article is a political attempt to prevent the public from believing the facts about the sorry state of affairs in pain care.

Comment


Please read our comments policy before posting

Stanford Medicine Resources: