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Unlocking the secrets to human longevity

Does the key to extending life lie within our genetic code? In this Stanford+Connects micro lecture, Stuart Kim, PhD, a professor of developmental biology and genetics, explains why he believes the answer is yes.

In his lab at Stanford, Kim and colleagues study functional genomics and aging and the search for genes that can either speed up or slow down aging, in particular with respect to the kidney. During this talk, he shares some of his lab's advances in developmental biology in doubling the lifespan of a nematode, which is the world's fastest-aging animal.

Previously: Male roundworms shorten females’ lifespan with soluble compounds, say Stanford researchers, Key to naked mole rat longevity may be related to their body’s ability to make proteins accurately, Longevity gene tied to nerve stem cell regeneration, say Stanford researchers and California’s oldest person helping geneticists uncover key to aging

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