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How can we end the donor organ shortage?

organ donorOur country's organ shortage is an issue of critical importance - especially to the more than 100,000 Americans currently waiting for an organ transplant. In the words of Stanford's Keith Humphreys, PhD, "Everyone agrees that 18 people dying each day on transplant waiting lists is unacceptable, but there is fierce disagreement about what to do about it."

Next week, Humphreys will moderate a panel discussion that delves into the issue. He'll be joined by three experts - including Stanford bioethicist David Magnus, PhD - who will discuss the effect of the organ donation on our country's overall health and debate the ethical and practical aspects of proposals to solve the problem. Among the most controversial proposed approach and something that will be vigorously debated: paying people to donate their organs.

The event, part of Stanford's Health Policy Forum series, will be held on July 28 at 11 AM at the Li Ka Shing Center for Learning and Knowledge, in room LK130. For those local readers: It's free and open to the public, but space is limited. More information can be found on the forum website.

Previously: Students launch Stanford Life Savers initiative to boost organ donation, Full-length video available for Stanford’s Health Policy Forum on serious mental illness, Stanford forum on the future of health care in America posted online and Stanford Health Policy Forum focuses on America’s methamphetamine epidemic
Photo by Mika Marttila

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