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Country music stars thank Under One Umbrella for supporting Stanford Women’s Cancer Center

7856258414_163d347129_zCombatting cancer isn't cheap. It takes an innovative team with access to top equipment and support. A team that can provide compassionate care while developing new therapies and scouring through detailed data to uncover unknown aspects of the disease.

At the Stanford's Women's Cancer Center, that's where the Under One Umbrella movement comes in. Now in its sixth year, this group has raised more than $23 million for projects benefitting women with cancer. That money pays for leading doctors and researchers, drug and clinical trials, improved facilities, new treatments, tools and more.

"Your generosity is palpable," Mark Pegram, MD, director of the Stanford Breast Cancer Oncology Program, told the several hundred donors who gathered at Sharon Heights Golf & Country Club in Palo Alto for the group's annual luncheon earlier this week. Researchers are making molecular "portraits" of breast cancer to determine which patients would benefit from chemotherapy, he said. They're testing a treatment that "packs all the punch of chemo, but with no chemo side effects."

Due to a gift from Sonoma County winery Chateau St. Jean, all of the proceeds from the luncheon were used to support the programs, according to Lisa Schatz, former chair of the steering committee.

During the event, organizers screened a video tribute to Gwen Yearwood, a former patient of the Stanford Women's Cancer Center, featuring her daughters — singer Trisha Yearwood and Beth Bernard. Then, out came Yearwood and her husband, Garth Brooks to serenade the attendees. "Our family is so grateful," Yearwood said. "We're an example of the many families who have benefited from (Stanford) care."

In appreciation of their service, each donor left the luncheon with a pink umbrella, which came in handy as the Bay Area received much-needed rain in the following days.

Additional information about the group is available on its Facebook page.

Previously: Stanford Women's Cancer Center: Peace of mind and advanced care under one umbrella, At Stanford event, cancer advocate Susan Love talks about  "a future with no breast cancer" and Don't hide from breast cancer — facing it early is key 
Photo by 55Laney69

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