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Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sean Parker establishes allergy center at Stanford

DrKariNadeau-Dec2014Here at Scope, we’ve often written about the life-threatening nature of allergic reactions and the work that Stanford scientists are doing to understand dangerous allergies. For instance, Stanford immunologist Kari Nadeau, MD, PhD, (pictured at right) leads research to combat children’s food allergies with oral immunotherapy, a treatment in which patients consume tiny but gradually increasing doses of their allergy triggers under a doctor’s supervision.

Today, the efforts of Nadeau and other Stanford allergy researchers are receiving a big boost. Silicon Valley entrepreneur and philanthropist Sean Parker has announced that he's donating $24 million to establish an allergy research center at Stanford, which Nadeau will lead. Parker has a personal interest in the topic because of his own experience with severe food allergies. Scientists at the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy Research at Stanford University will study the underlying mechanisms of all types of allergies in children and adults and will aim to develop lasting allergy cures.

From the press release about the center’s launch:

“We are excited about the center because there is enormous clinical need for better understanding of and treatment for allergies,” said Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of Stanford University School of Medicine. “For instance, the recent profound increase in the incidence of serious food allergy is fascinating and deeply concerning at the same time. Sean Parker’s generous gift will enable Stanford Medicine experts, under Dr. Nadeau’s leadership, to collaborate and innovate across academic disciplines for the benefit of millions of people with allergies.”

“I am thrilled and honored to direct the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy Research at Stanford University,” said Dr. Nadeau, associate professor of pediatrics at the medical school and an immunologist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford and Stanford Health Care. “Sean is well-versed in immunology, and has been a fantastic partner to work with. He’s an entrepreneur and visionary, and we look forward to using this gift and center as the springboard to improve the lives of those adults with allergies through immunotherapy that goes beyond oral therapy.”

Previously: Taking a bite out of food allergies: Stanford doctors exploring new ways to help sufferers, Ask Stanford Med: Pediatric immunologist answers your questions about food allergy research and Researchers show how DNA-based test could keep peanut allergy at bay

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